I’ve got an MVC site that’s using Entity Framework 6 to handle the database, and I’ve been experimenting with changing it so that everything runs as async controllers and calls to the database are ran as their async counterparts (eg. ToListAsync() instead of ToList())

The problem I’m having is that simply changing my queries to async has caused them to be incredibly slow.

The following code gets a collection of "Album" objects from my data context and is translated to a fairly simple database join:

// Get the albums
var albums = await this.context.Albums
    .Where(x => x.Artist.ID == artist.ID)
    .ToListAsync();

Here’s the SQL that’s created:

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[Extent1].[ID] AS [ID], 
[Extent1].[URL] AS [URL], 
[Extent1].[ASIN] AS [ASIN], 
[Extent1].[Title] AS [Title], 
[Extent1].[ReleaseDate] AS [ReleaseDate], 
[Extent1].[AccurateDay] AS [AccurateDay], 
[Extent1].[AccurateMonth] AS [AccurateMonth], 
[Extent1].[Type] AS [Type], 
[Extent1].[Tracks] AS [Tracks], 
[Extent1].[MainCredits] AS [MainCredits], 
[Extent1].[SupportingCredits] AS [SupportingCredits], 
[Extent1].[Description] AS [Description], 
[Extent1].[Image] AS [Image], 
[Extent1].[HasImage] AS [HasImage], 
[Extent1].[Created] AS [Created], 
[Extent1].[Artist_ID] AS [Artist_ID]
FROM [dbo].[Albums] AS [Extent1]
WHERE [Extent1].[Artist_ID] = @p__linq__0',N'@p__linq__0 int',@p__linq__0=134

As things go, it’s not a massively complicated query, but it’s taking almost 6 seconds for SQL server to run it. SQL Server Profiler reports it as taking 5742ms to complete.

If I change my code to:

// Get the albums
var albums = this.context.Albums
    .Where(x => x.Artist.ID == artist.ID)
    .ToList();

Then the exact same SQL is generated, yet this runs in just 474ms according to SQL Server Profiler.

The database has around 3500 rows in the "Albums" table, which isn’t really very many, and has an index on the "Artist_ID" column, so it should be pretty fast.

I know that async has overheads, but making things go ten times slower seems a bit steep to me! Where am I going wrong here?

  • it does not look right to me. If you execute the same query with the same data, the execution time reported by SQL Server Profiler should be more or less the same because async is what happens in c#, not Sql. Sql server is even not aware that your c# code is async – Khanh TO Feb 16 '15 at 14:33
  • when you run your generated query the first time, it may take a bit longer to compile the query (build execution plan,...), from the second time, the same query may be faster (Sql server caches the query), but there should not be too much different. – Khanh TO Feb 16 '15 at 14:38
  • 2
    You need to determine what's slow. Run the query in an infinite loop. Pause the debugger 10 times. Where does it stop most often? Post the stack including external code. – usr Feb 16 '15 at 14:47
  • 1
    It looks like the problem is to do with the Image property, which I’d totally forgotten about. It’s a VARBINARY(MAX) column, so is bound to cause slowness, but it’s still a bit weird that the slowness only becomes an issue running async. I’ve restructured my database so that the images are now part of a linked table and everything is far faster now. – Dylan Parry Feb 16 '15 at 15:02
  • 1
    The problem might be that EF is issuing tons of async reads to ADO.NET to retrieve all those bytes and rows. That way the overhead is magnified. Since you did not perform the measurement I asked we will never know. Problem seems to be solved. – usr Feb 16 '15 at 15:04
up vote 244 down vote accepted
+100

I found this question very interesting, especially since I'm using async everywhere with Ado.Net and EF 6. I was hoping someone to give an explanation for this question, but it doesn't happened. So I tried to reproduce this problem on my side. I hope some of you will find this interesting.

First good news : I reproduced it :) And the difference is enormous. With a factor 8 ...

first results

First I was suspecting something dealing with CommandBehavior, since I read an interesting article about async with Ado, saying this :

"Since non-sequential access mode has to store the data for the entire row, it can cause issues if you are reading a large column from the server (such as varbinary(MAX), varchar(MAX), nvarchar(MAX) or XML)."

I was suspecting ToList() calls to be CommandBehavior.SequentialAccess and async ones to be CommandBehavior.Default (non-sequential, which can cause issues). So I downloaded EF6's sources, and put breakpoints everywhere (where CommandBehavior where used, of course).

Result : nothing. All the calls are made with CommandBehavior.Default .... So I tried to step into EF code to understand what happens... and.. ooouch... I never see such a delegating code, everything seems lazy executed...

So I tried to do some profiling to understand what happens...

And I think I have something...

Here's the model to create the table I benchmarked, with 3500 lines inside of it, and 256 Kb random data in each varbinary(MAX). (EF 6.1 - CodeFirst - CodePlex) :

public class TestContext : DbContext
{
    public TestContext()
        : base(@"Server=(localdb)\\v11.0;Integrated Security=true;Initial Catalog=BENCH") // Local instance
    {
    }
    public DbSet<TestItem> Items { get; set; }
}

public class TestItem
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public byte[] BinaryData { get; set; }
}

And here's the code I used to create the test data, and benchmark EF.

using (TestContext db = new TestContext())
{
    if (!db.Items.Any())
    {
        foreach (int i in Enumerable.Range(0, 3500)) // Fill 3500 lines
        {
            byte[] dummyData = new byte[1 << 18];  // with 256 Kbyte
            new Random().NextBytes(dummyData);
            db.Items.Add(new TestItem() { Name = i.ToString(), BinaryData = dummyData });
        }
        await db.SaveChangesAsync();
    }
}

using (TestContext db = new TestContext())  // EF Warm Up
{
    var warmItUp = db.Items.FirstOrDefault();
    warmItUp = await db.Items.FirstOrDefaultAsync();
}

Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
using (TestContext db = new TestContext())
{
    watch.Start();
    var testRegular = db.Items.ToList();
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("non async : " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

using (TestContext db = new TestContext())
{
    watch.Restart();
    var testAsync = await db.Items.ToListAsync();
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("async : " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(CS))
{
    await connection.OpenAsync();
    using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT ID, Name, BinaryData FROM dbo.TestItems", connection))
    {
        watch.Restart();
        List<TestItem> itemsWithAdo = new List<TestItem>();
        var reader = await cmd.ExecuteReaderAsync(CommandBehavior.SequentialAccess);
        while (await reader.ReadAsync())
        {
            var item = new TestItem();
            item.ID = (int)reader[0];
            item.Name = (String)reader[1];
            item.BinaryData = (byte[])reader[2];
            itemsWithAdo.Add(item);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("ExecuteReaderAsync SequentialAccess : " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(CS))
{
    await connection.OpenAsync();
    using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT ID, Name, BinaryData FROM dbo.TestItems", connection))
    {
        watch.Restart();
        List<TestItem> itemsWithAdo = new List<TestItem>();
        var reader = await cmd.ExecuteReaderAsync(CommandBehavior.Default);
        while (await reader.ReadAsync())
        {
            var item = new TestItem();
            item.ID = (int)reader[0];
            item.Name = (String)reader[1];
            item.BinaryData = (byte[])reader[2];
            itemsWithAdo.Add(item);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("ExecuteReaderAsync Default : " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(CS))
{
    await connection.OpenAsync();
    using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT ID, Name, BinaryData FROM dbo.TestItems", connection))
    {
        watch.Restart();
        List<TestItem> itemsWithAdo = new List<TestItem>();
        var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SequentialAccess);
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            var item = new TestItem();
            item.ID = (int)reader[0];
            item.Name = (String)reader[1];
            item.BinaryData = (byte[])reader[2];
            itemsWithAdo.Add(item);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("ExecuteReader SequentialAccess : " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(CS))
{
    await connection.OpenAsync();
    using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT ID, Name, BinaryData FROM dbo.TestItems", connection))
    {
        watch.Restart();
        List<TestItem> itemsWithAdo = new List<TestItem>();
        var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.Default);
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            var item = new TestItem();
            item.ID = (int)reader[0];
            item.Name = (String)reader[1];
            item.BinaryData = (byte[])reader[2];
            itemsWithAdo.Add(item);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("ExecuteReader Default : " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

For the regular EF call (.ToList()), the profiling seems "normal" and is easy to read :

ToList trace

Here we find the 8.4 seconds we have with the Stopwatch (profiling slow downs the perfs). We also find HitCount = 3500 along the call path, which is consistent with the 3500 lines in the test. On the TDS parser side, things start to became worse since we read 118 353 calls on TryReadByteArray() method, which is were the buffering loop occurs. (an average 33.8 calls for each byte[] of 256kb)

For the async case, it's really really different.... First, the .ToListAsync() call is scheduled on the ThreadPool, and then awaited. Nothing amazing here. But, now, here's the async hell on the ThreadPool :

ToListAsync hell

First, in the first case we were having just 3500 hit counts along the full call path, here we have 118 371. Moreover, you have to imagine all the synchronization calls I didn't put on the screenshoot...

Second, in the first case, we were having "just 118 353" calls to the TryReadByteArray() method, here we have 2 050 210 calls ! It's 17 times more... (on a test with large 1Mb array, it's 160 times more)

Moreover there are :

  • 120 000 Task instances created
  • 727 519 Interlocked calls
  • 290 569 Monitor calls
  • 98 283 ExecutionContext instances, with 264 481 Captures
  • 208 733 SpinLock calls

My guess is the buffering is made in an async way (and not a good one), with parallel Tasks trying to read data from the TDS. Too many Task are created just to parse the binary data.

As a preliminary conclusion, we can say Async is great, EF6 is great, but EF6's usages of async in it's current implementation adds a major overhead, on the performance side, the Threading side, and the CPU side (12% CPU usage in the ToList() case and 20% in the ToListAsync case for a 8 to 10 times longer work... I run it on an old i7 920).

While doings some tests, I was thinking about this article again and I notice something I miss :

"For the new asynchronous methods in .Net 4.5, their behavior is exactly the same as with the synchronous methods, except for one notable exception: ReadAsync in non-sequential mode."

What ?!!!

So I extend my benchmarks to include Ado.Net in regular / async call, and with CommandBehavior.SequentialAccess / CommandBehavior.Default, and here's a big surprise ! :

with ado

We have the exact same behavior with Ado.Net !!! Facepalm...

My definitive conclusion is : there's a bug in EF 6 implementation. It should toggle the CommandBehavior to SequentialAccess when an async call is made over a table containing a binary(max) column. The problem of creating too many Task, slowing down the process, is on the Ado.Net side. The EF problem is that it doesn't use Ado.Net as it should.

Now you know instead of using the EF6 async methods, you would better have to call EF in a regular non-async way, and then use a TaskCompletionSource<T> to return the result in an async way.

Note 1 : I edited my post because of a shameful error.... I've done my first test over the network, not locally, and the limited bandwidth have distorted the results. Here are the updated results.

Note 2 : I didn't extends my test to other uses cases (ex : nvarchar(max) with a lot of data), but there are chances the same behavior happens.

Note 3 : Something usual for the ToList() case, is the 12% CPU (1/8 of my CPU = 1 logical core). Something unusual is the maximum 20% for the ToListAsync() case, as if the Scheduler could not use all the Treads. It's probably due to the too many Task created, or maybe a bottleneck in TDS parser, I don't know...

  • 1
    I did the test with just ConfigureAwait(), then with SetMinThreads(), and it's the same order of magnitude. – rducom Feb 20 '15 at 19:56
  • 2
    I opened an issue on codeplex, hope they will do something about it. entityframework.codeplex.com/workitem/2686 – rducom Feb 21 '15 at 13:01
  • 3
    Sadly the issue on GitHub has been closed with the advice to not use async with varbinary. In theory varbinary should be the case where async makes most sense as the thread will be blocked longer while the file is transmitted. So what do we do now if we want to save binary data in the DB? – Stilgar May 23 '17 at 19:56
  • 5
    Anyone know if this is still an issue in EF Core? I've been unable to find any information or benchmarks. – Andrew Lewis Jun 8 '17 at 18:41
  • 2
    @AndrewLewis I have no science behind it, but I'm having repeated connection pool timeouts with EF Core where the two queries causing issues are .ToListAsync() and .CountAsync()... To anybody else finding this comment thread, this query may help. Godspeed. – Scott Jul 4 '17 at 23:09

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