1

Having a coffeescript class like:

class A
  headers: []

  addHeader: (name, value) ->
    @headers.push {
      name: name,
      value: value
    }


a = new A()
a.addHeader 'header1', 'value1'
console.log 'A:', a.headers
console.log '---'
b = new A()
b.addHeader 'header2', 'value2'
console.log 'B:', b.headers
console.log '---'
console.log 'A:', a.headers

Executing this script gives me the following output:

A: [ { name: 'header1', value: 'value1' } ]
---
B: [ { name: 'header1', value: 'value1' },
  { name: 'header2', value: 'value2' } ]
---
A: [ { name: 'header1', value: 'value1' },
  { name: 'header2', value: 'value2' } ]

Why the heck is the tuple {'header2': 'value2'} being added to the first object, A as well?

Here's a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/L5c1nv3z/

I must be doing it wrong. Although I prefer declaring member variables for the classes in order to keep track of them.

  • 2
    This isn't really a CoffeeScript problem BTW, this is a side effect of how prototypes work in JavaScript. Don't attach mutable properties to the prototype as the prototype belongs to everyone. OTOH, attach mutable properties to the prototype if you explicitly want them to be shared but then you'd want a comment to explain its purpose or people will probably think it is a bug. – mu is too short Feb 16 '15 at 19:00
  • Thanks. Therefore, I should always be assigning member variables in the constructor? Or what is considered "best practice"? – Atmocreations Feb 16 '15 at 19:51
  • 1
    The answer is, of course, "it depends". Non-mutable things (strings, numbers, booleans) are fine in the prototype since you can't change them without assigning a new value and won't interfere with the prototype. Might be safer and more consistent to use the constructor until you've internalized how the prototype system works. – mu is too short Feb 16 '15 at 20:24
2

That's because your class will compile to this:

var A;

A = (function() {
  function A() {}

  A.prototype.headers = [];

  A.prototype.addHeader = function(name, value) {
    return this.headers.push({
      name: name,
      value: value
    });
  };

  return A;

})();

As you can see headers are a property of A.prototype. Since you don't override it for each instance of A class you create (a and b in your example), when this.headers.push is invoked in addHeader method it always modifies the same array - the one that belongs to A.prototype.

To create unique headers array for each instance of your A class use constructor function. Try do it like that:

class A
  constructor: ->
    @headers = []

  addHeader: (name, value) ->
    @headers.push {
      name: name,
      value: value
    }

You can read more about it in The Little Book on CoffeeScript.

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