31

I have a question about the Reduce function in R. I read its documentation, but I am still confused a bit. So, I have 5 vectors with genes name. For example:

v1 <- c("geneA","geneB",""...)
v2 <- c("geneA","geneC",""...)
v3 <- c("geneD","geneE",""...)
v4 <- c("geneA","geneE",""...)
v5 <- c("geneB","geneC",""...)

And I would like to find out which genes are present in at least two vectors. Some people have suggested:

Reduce(intersect,list(a,b,c,d,e))

I would greatly appreciate if someone could please explain to me how this statement works, because I have seen Reduce used in other scenarios.

  • 3
    Is your question really "How can I find which genes/elements are present in at least two vectors?" If so, Reduce() is not going to be helpful, though it would make it easy to answer the question "which genes are present in all of the vectors?" – Josh O'Brien Feb 16 '15 at 16:37
33

Reduce takes a binary function and a list of data items and successively applies the function to the list elements in a recursive fashion. For example:

Reduce(intersect,list(a,b,c))

is the same as

intersect((intersect(a,b),c)

However, I don't think that construct will help you here as it will only return those elements that are common to all vectors.

To count the number of vectors that a gene appears in you could do the following:

vlist <- list(v1,v2,v3,v4,v5)
addmargins(table(gene=unlist(vlist), vec=rep(paste0("v",1:5),times=sapply(vlist,length))),2,list(Count=function(x) sum(x[x>0])))
       vec
gene    v1 v2 v3 v4 v5 Count
  geneA  1  1  0  1  0     3
  geneB  1  0  0  0  1     2
  geneC  0  1  0  0  1     2
  geneD  0  0  1  0  0     1
  geneE  0  0  1  1  0     2
  • Thank you very much for your input. I have never used the table and addmargins functions before. If you don't mind, I'd like to ask you about them. – Johnathan Feb 16 '15 at 19:49
  • table: so gene is the object that can be used as factor (i.e. categorial data), and vec is the names of the dimensions (i.e."v1","v2"), right? I am confused about what times means. It returns vectors of length. As for addmargins, it is a function that extends a table to add the marginal totals (i.e. total counts of the cases over the categories of interest), right? "2" means add a column that will hold the row marginal totals, right? Finally, the last argument is a list that contains the function. Thank you for your time and help! – Johnathan Feb 16 '15 at 20:04
  • 1
    @Johnathan Yes, you are right. times is an argument to rep which determines how many times each element gets repeated - this is to ensure that the genes are mapped to the correct variable. – James Feb 20 '15 at 12:27
  • Thank you for your input. I have read R's documentation. Rep the values in x (e.g. v1...). I am still confused by length. Apparently, it is a vector giving the number of times to repeat each element if of length length(x). For example, if v2 has length 2, shouldn't it mean that each element be repeated twice? I don't understand how this ensure that the genes are mapped to the correct variable. Sorry for the confusion. I am sure that it is something obvious. thank you! – Johnathan Feb 20 '15 at 23:58
  • It's very weird how the argument types are flipped. It would feel much better if it was consistent with the convention "apply(list, function)". – Vlady Veselinov Feb 27 '18 at 2:11
27

A nice way to see what Reduce() is doing is to run it with its argument accumulate=TRUE. When accumulate=TRUE, it will return a vector or list in which each element shows its state after processing the first n elements of the list in x. Here are a couple of examples:

Reduce(`*`, x=list(5,4,3,2), accumulate=TRUE)
# [1]   5  20  60 120

i2 <- seq(0,100,by=2)
i3 <- seq(0,100,by=3)
i5 <- seq(0,100,by=5)
Reduce(intersect, x=list(i2,i3,i5), accumulate=TRUE)
# [[1]]
#  [1]   0   2   4   6   8  10  12  14  16  18  20  22  24  26  28  30  32  34  36
# [20]  38  40  42  44  46  48  50  52  54  56  58  60  62  64  66  68  70  72  74
# [39]  76  78  80  82  84  86  88  90  92  94  96  98 100
# 
# [[2]]
#  [1]  0  6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72 78 84 90 96
# 
# [[3]]
# [1]  0 30 60 90
  • Can it be used with greater than comparisons, obviously I tried it an I got the first number in the sequence followed by either 11111 or 00000. My expected values for something like Reduce('<',c(3,4,7,2,6,8,9), accumulate=T) would have been 3 3 2 2 2 2. Is this achievable with Reduce? A bit of explaining, I assumed Reduce takes the elements of a vector 2 at a time starting from the left. Since my function is "less than" it would compare the first 2 returning the smaller number, then compare that to the 3rd returning the smaller... – user3507767 May 14 '16 at 12:49
  • just to clarify, I know I can get my desired results with cummin(), just trying to understand Reduce() here. – user3507767 May 14 '16 at 12:55
7

Assuming the input values given at the end of this answer, the expression

Reduce(intersect,list(a,b,c,d,e))
## character(0)

gives the genes that are present in all vectors, not the genes that are present in at least two vectors. It means:

intersect(intersect(intersect(intersect(a, b), c), d), e)
## character(0)

If we want the genes that are in at least two vectors:

L <- list(a, b, c, d, e)
u <- unlist(lapply(L, unique)) # or:  Reduce(c, lapply(L, unique))

tab <- table(u)
names(tab[tab > 1])
## [1] "geneA" "geneB" "geneC" "geneE"

or

sort(unique(u[duplicated(u)]))
## [1] "geneA" "geneB" "geneC" "geneE"

Note: We used:

a <- c("geneA","geneB")
b <- c("geneA","geneC")
c <- c("geneD","geneE")
d <- c("geneA","geneE")
e <- c("geneB","geneC")

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