75

I've run into this issue in real code, but I put together a trivial example to prove the point.

The below code works fine. I've set up a variable in my root describe() block that is accessible within my sub-describe()s' it() blocks.

describe('simple object', function () {
    var orchard;

    beforeEach(function () {
        orchard = {
            trees: {
                apple: 10,
                orange : 20
            },
            bushes: {
                boysenberry : 40,
                blueberry: 35
            }
        };
    });

    describe('trees', function () {
        it ('should have apples and oranges', function() {
            var trees = orchard.trees;

            expect (trees.apple).toBeDefined();
            expect (trees.orange).toBeDefined();

            expect (trees.apple).toEqual(10);
            expect (trees.orange).toEqual(20);
        });
        it ('should NOT have pears or cherries', function() {
            var trees = orchard.trees;

            expect (trees.pear).toBeUndefined();
            expect (trees.cherry).toBeUndefined();
        });
    });
});

http://jsfiddle.net/w5bzrkh9/

However, if I try to DRY up my code a little by doing the following, it breaks:

describe('simple object', function () {
    var orchard;

    beforeEach(function () {
        orchard = {
            trees: {
                apple: 10,
                orange : 20
            },
            bushes: {
                boysenberry : 40,
                blueberry: 35
            }
        };
    });

    describe('trees', function () {
        var trees = orchard.trees; // TypeError: Cannot read property 'trees' of undefined

        it ('should have apples and oranges', function() {
            expect (trees.apple).toBeDefined();
            expect (trees.orange).toBeDefined();

            expect (trees.apple).toEqual(10);
            expect (trees.orange).toEqual(20);
        });
        it ('should NOT have pears or cherries', function() {
            expect (trees.pear).toBeUndefined();
            expect (trees.cherry).toBeUndefined();
        });
    });
});

http://jsfiddle.net/goqcev42/

Within the nested describe() scope, the orchard object is undefined, even though it's defined within the it() blocks within it.

Is this intentional on the part of Jasmine's developers, possibly to avoid issues with resetting the object in beforeEach() and possible breaking some references? How do they make it happen? I could see how this might be useful, I'm just very curious as to how it works. (My guess is some apply() or call() magic, but I'm not sure how...)

--

As a side-note, I can still DRY up my code by simply using another beforeEach() block:

describe('simple object', function () {
    var orchard;

    beforeEach(function () {
        orchard = {
            trees: {
                apple: 10,
                orange : 20
            },
            bushes: {
                boysenberry : 40,
                blueberry: 35
            }
        };
    });

    describe('trees', function () {
        var trees;

        beforeEach(function() {
            trees = orchard.trees;
        });

        it ('should have apples and oranges', function() {
            expect (trees.apple).toBeDefined();
            expect (trees.orange).toBeDefined();

            expect (trees.apple).toEqual(10);
            expect (trees.orange).toEqual(20);
        });
        it ('should NOT have pears or cherries', function() {
            expect (trees.pear).toBeUndefined();
            expect (trees.cherry).toBeUndefined();
        });
    });
});
7
  • 8
    Use a debugger to trace the flow of execution through your program, you'll find that the beforeEach executes before each it, not once before the entire describe. This is the whole point of beforeEach, it's before each test case.
    – user229044
    Feb 16, 2015 at 16:59
  • @Andrew Eisenberg, what if I want to call a helper JS function that has 'it' tests in it and those tests require trees ? I want to be able to call it from describe because I cannot call a it from a it. What are my options in this case ?
    – TechCrunch
    Feb 23, 2016 at 4:35
  • 1
    @TechCrunch What do you mean by "trees"? Generally if you need to initialize some data structures or test inputs before you run any it() statements you'd want to use a beforeEach() block. If you need some code to run exactly once for the whole describe(), rather than once per it(), use beforeAll(). Details here: jasmine.github.io/2.1/… Feb 23, 2016 at 12:42
  • @KenB, I'm referring to trees as in your example code. I posted my question at stackoverflow.com/questions/35568104/….
    – TechCrunch
    Feb 23, 2016 at 18:19
  • broken fiddles.
    – Kurkula
    Aug 31, 2017 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

75

The body of a describe block is executed before the beforeEach blocks.

This is exactly as expected. The problem is that your var trees variable is trying to access orchard before it has been initialized. The body of a describe block is executed before the beforeEach blocks. To solve this problem, the third code snippet is the only way to go.

Jasmine will first execute the describe blocks, and then execute the beforeEach blocks before running each test.

5
  • What if you have a bunch of describe statements in a file, but need to initialize the same things in a beforeEach for every describe block? Is there any way to declare the initialization once? Jan 11, 2016 at 17:02
  • The closest thing I can think of is to add something to your karma configuration file. Jan 11, 2016 at 20:06
  • 3
    @Nocomm Generally the answer is to group all describes that need a shared beforeEach() within a master describe() that has that beforeEach(). Nothing wrong with nesting describes within other describes! Jan 11, 2016 at 21:46
  • @kenbellows what is the difference between what you are describing here and OP's second code block? Jul 6, 2016 at 14:35
  • @michaelAdam Do you mean the third code block, or do you really mean the second block? The third block is exactly what I'm describing here Jul 6, 2016 at 15:02
4

Well you could still initialize variables outside the beforeEach block. I generally do it for constants and still remain DRY without introducing beforeEach blocks.

describe('simple object', function () {
    const orchard = {
        trees: {
            apple: 10,
            orange: 20
        },
        bushes: {
            boysenberry: 40,
            blueberry: 35
        }
    };


    describe('trees', function () {
        const trees = orchard.trees;

        it('should have apples and oranges', function () {


            expect(trees.apple).toBeDefined();
            expect(trees.orange).toBeDefined();

            expect(trees.apple).toEqual(10);
            expect(trees.orange).toEqual(20);
        });
        it('should NOT have pears or cherries', function () {
            var trees = orchard.trees;

            expect(trees.pear).toBeUndefined();
            expect(trees.cherry).toBeUndefined();
        });
    });
});
1
  • 1
    Even with const, that setup is somewhat risky since trees and bushes are not const themselves. The only way to do it safely is deep freezing the object. Sep 18, 2017 at 20:21
4

Lets take the third code snippet. Further, it can be refactored as below:

describe('simple object', function () {
    var orchard;

    beforeEach(function () {
        orchard = {
            trees: {
                apple: 10,
                orange : 20
            },
            bushes: {
                boysenberry : 40,
                blueberry: 35
            }
        };
    });

    describe('trees', function () {

        it ('should have apples and oranges', function() {
            expect (orchard.trees.apple).toBeDefined();
            expect (orchard.trees.orange).toBeDefined();

            expect (orchard.trees.apple).toEqual(10);
            expect (orchard.trees.orange).toEqual(20);
        });
        it ('should NOT have pears or cherries', function() {
            expect (orchard.trees.pear).toBeUndefined();
            expect (orchard.trees.cherry).toBeUndefined();
        });
    });
});

For the new comers to Jasmine, this is how you intrepret the above code :\

  1. describe defines a test suite. The test suite name here is a user defined simple string, say "simple object".
  2. A test suite can itself contain other test suites, meaning describecan contain nested suites.
  3. Just like other programming languages, orchid is global to all the functions & suites defined within simple object test suite.
  4. It block is called a specification or a SPEC. It blocks contain individual tests.
  5. Just when Jasmine executes the test cases, it will first visit the it blocks meaning it will traverse all the it block declarations.
  6. When Jasmine actually executes test cases, it will check for beforeEach function and hence orchard gets trees value assigned to it.
  7. And hence you need not write a beforeEach function, inside a sub suite. You can simply ignore

    beforeEach (function() { trees = orchard.trees; });

  8. Now compare the latest snippet below with the third snippet above.

4
  • This is of course a perfectly valid way to write the code that gets around the problem, but the point of my question was to find a good way to avoid writing orchard.trees in each expect(). This is a simplistic example, but imagine you were testing some deep sub-object like farmers[0].farms[5].products.orchard.trees. That's going to become unreadable pretty quickly. And even beside that, the point of describe("trees") is to describe the trees object directly, so, IMHO, it's more in line with the spirit of the BDD style to pull out the specific thing you're testing. Thoughts? Oct 25, 2017 at 11:20
  • If the need for testing out deep sub objects, then your third code snippet looks good for me :) Oct 27, 2017 at 9:07
  • 1
    I would argue that the beforeEach should really be beforeAll since you're not changing the data. There's no reason to run that before each test. Jun 29, 2020 at 22:31
  • Could you also not use this.orchard instead of declaring var orchard? Jun 29, 2020 at 22:32

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