I'm inserting into a Cassandra table with timestamp columns. The data I have comes with microsecond precision, so the time data string looks like this:

2015-02-16T18:00:03.234+00:00

However, in cqlsh when I run a select query the microsecond data is not shown, I can only see time down to second precision. The 234 microseconds data is not shown.

I guess I have two questions:

1) Does Cassandra capture microseconds with timestamp data type? My guess is yes?

2) How can I see that with cqlsh to verify?

Table definition:

create table data (
  datetime timestamp,
  id text,
  type text,
  data text,
  primary key (id, type, datetime)
) 
with compaction = {'class' : 'DateTieredCompactionStrategy'};

Insert query ran with Java PreparedStatment:

insert into data (datetime, id, type, data) values(?, ?, ?, ?);

Select query was simply:

select * from data;
  • Can you edit your post with your table definition, INSERT and SELECT query? I won't know for sure until I see that information, but your issue may be related to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/26237940/… – Aaron Feb 16 '15 at 18:14
  • Just updated my post as you asked. Let me know if this is not clear enough. Thank you. – WillZ Feb 16 '15 at 18:34
up vote 43 down vote accepted

In an effort to answer your questions, I did a little digging on this one.

  1. Does Cassandra capture microseconds with timestamp data type?

Microseconds no, milliseconds yes. If I create your table, insert a row, and try to query it by the truncated time, it doesn't work:

aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> INSERT INTO data (datetime, id, type, data) 
VALUES ('2015-02-16T18:00:03.234+00:00','B26354','Blade Runner','Deckard- Filed and monitored.');
aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> SELECT * FROM data 
WHERE id='B26354' AND type='Blade Runner' AND datetime='2015-02-16 12:00:03-0600';

 id | type | datetime | data
----+------+----------+------

(0 rows)

But when I query for the same id and type values while specifying milliseconds:

aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> SELECT * FROM data 
WHERE id='B26354' AND type='Blade Runner' AND datetime='2015-02-16 12:00:03.234-0600';

 id     | type         | datetime                 | data
--------+--------------+--------------------------+-------------------------------
 B26354 | Blade Runner | 2015-02-16 12:00:03-0600 | Deckard- Filed and monitored.

(1 rows)

So the milliseconds are definitely there. There was a JIRA ticket created for this issue (CASSANDRA-5870), but it was resolved as "Won't Fix."

  1. How can I see that with cqlsh to verify?

One possible way to actually verify that the milliseconds are indeed there, is to nest the timestampAsBlob() function inside of blobAsBigint(), like this:

aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> SELECT id, type, blobAsBigint(timestampAsBlob(datetime)), 
data FROM data;

 id     | type         | blobAsBigint(timestampAsBlob(datetime)) | data
--------+--------------+-----------------------------------------+-------------------------------
 B26354 | Blade Runner |                           1424109603234 | Deckard- Filed and monitored.

(1 rows)

While not optimal, here you can clearly see the millisecond value of "234" on the very end. This becomes even more apparent if I add a row for the same timestamp, but without milliseconds:

aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> INSERT INTO data (id, type, datetime, data)
VALUES ('B25881','Blade Runner','2015-02-16T18:00:03+00:00','Holden- Fine as long as nobody unplugs him.');
aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow> SELECT id, type, blobAsBigint(timestampAsBlob(datetime)), 
                 ...     data FROM data;

 id     | type         | blobAsBigint(timestampAsBlob(datetime)) | data
--------+--------------+-----------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------
 B25881 | Blade Runner |                           1424109603000 | Holden- Fine as long as nobody unplugs him.
 B26354 | Blade Runner |                           1424109603234 |               Deckard- Filed and monitored.

(2 rows)
  • Thank you for the detailed reply, this is very helpful. I can work with the solution you have there. I guess in practice I'd get the timestamp back programmatically so as long as that works it should be fine. Is there a preference to store timestamp in bigint format then in this case? – WillZ Feb 17 '15 at 9:09
  • @Will Honestly it depends on your use case. If you're concerned with time precision then storing it as a timeuuid would be the way to go. But if milliseconds are more of a payload field or result ordering then I could see a bigint working for you. – Aaron Feb 17 '15 at 10:13
  • 1
    Yea for me the ordering does matter. will think about this. thanks! – WillZ Feb 17 '15 at 18:03
  • @Will no problem, glad I could help! – Aaron Feb 17 '15 at 18:04
  • Is there a way to fetch a timestamp by using a function like timestampAsBlob in node-cassandra-cql? – booleanhunter Jun 7 '15 at 12:07

You can configure the output format of datetime objects in the .cassandra/cqlshrc file, using python's 'strftime' syntax.

Unfortunately, the %f directive for microseconds (there does not seem to be a directive for milliseconds) does not work for older python versions, which means you have to fall back to the blobAsBigint(timestampAsBlob(date)) solution.

I think by "microseconds" (e.g 03.234567) you mean "milliseconds" (e.g. (03.234).

The issue here was a cqlsh bug that failed to support fractional seconds when dealing with timestamps.

So, while your millisecond value was preserved in the actual persistence layer (cassandra), the shell (cqlsh) failed to display them.

This was true even if you were to change time_format in .cqlshrc to display fractional seconds with an %f directive (e.g. %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f%z). In this configuration cqlsh would render 3.000000 for our 3.234 value, since the issue was in how cqlsh loaded the datetime objects without loading the partial seconds.

That all being said, this issue was fixed in CASSANDRA-10428, and released in Cassandra 3.4.

It is impossible to show microseconds (1 millionth of a second) using the Cassandra datatype 'timestamp' because the greatest precision available for that datatype is milliseconds (1 thousandth of a second).

http://docs.datastax.com/en/cql/3.1/cql/cql_reference/timestamp_type_r.html

Values for the timestamp type are encoded as 64-bit signed integers representing a number of milliseconds since the standard base time known as the epoch

Some related code:

cqlsh> CREATE KEYSPACE udf
  WITH replication = {'class': 'SimpleStrategy', 'replication_factor' : 3};

cqlsh> USE udf;

cqlsh:udf> CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION udf.timeuuid_as_us ( t timeuuid ) 
RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
RETURNS bigint LANGUAGE JAVA AS '
  long msb = t.getMostSignificantBits();
  return
    ( ((msb >> 32) & 0x00000000FFFFFFFFL)
    | ((msb & 0x00000000FFFF0000L) << 16)
    | ((msb & 0x0000000000000FFFL) << 48)
    ) / 10
    - 12219292800000000L;
';

cqlsh:udf> SELECT
  toUnixTimestamp(now())    AS now_ms
, udf.timeuuid_as_us(now()) AS now_us
FROM system.local;

 now_ms        | now_us
---------------+------------------
 1525995892841 | 1525995892841000

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