27

Upon reading the ASM 4.1 source code I've found instances of the following:

int ASM4 = 4 << 16 | 0 << 8 | 0;
int ASM5 = 5 << 16 | 0 << 8 | 0;

Does these left shifts of zero by 8 do anything to the expression, or the 'or' by 0 for that matter?

Wouldn't it be equivalent to just have:

int ASM4 = 4 << 16;
int ASM5 = 5 << 16;
7
  • 1
    shifting zero will result in 0 ...
    – SMA
    Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 18:13
  • 1
    testing for the equivalence is easy: ideone.com/NabSvO
    – user180100
    Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 18:18
  • 2
    Maybe it's some boiler plate that happens to be zero here? Easy to change to something else as is.
    – keyser
    Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 18:19
  • 3
    What's the point of shifting a constant? Might as well write int ASM4 = 262144; (The answer to this question is the same as the answer to that question) Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 3:08
  • 2
    @immibis it's easier to see where the number came from if you use the shift. I wouldn't recognise 262144 as 4^16 (or even 2^18).
    – Holloway
    Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 9:36

3 Answers 3

38

Indeed they are equivalent but one possible explanation is that they wanted to map the version numbers including both the major and minor numbers to a unique ID in their code. So in the following:

int ASM4 = 4 << 16 | 0 << 8 | 0; // this looks like 4.0.0
int ASM5 = 5 << 16 | 0 << 8 | 0; // this looks list 5.0.0

The 4 and 5 represent versions 4 and 5 respectively, and the zero in 0 << 8 could potentially be the minor numbers, and the last zero is another minor number, as in 4.0.0 and 5.0.0. But that's my guess anyway. You'd really have to ask the authors.

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  • 17
    +1: a program is written not only for a computer to compile, but for the next developer to read. In fact, I find programs more and more are written for the next developer to read, with a little dash of syntax here and there to make it compile. Large programs are hard to read!
    – Cort Ammon
    Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 21:47
  • 8
    int ASM4 = 0x400; would have accomplished the same purpose a little more concisely.. Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 0:15
  • 4
    @pericynthion: Maybe the same purpose, but to get the identical effect you'd have to write int ASM4 = 0x40000 which IMHO makes it less obvious that this corresponds to version 4.0.0. (And maybe they wanted to allow for version 4.0.16...) Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 3:32
  • 4
    @NateEldredge Indeed. I like that 5 people +1ed my comment, all of whom evidently can't remember how many bits are in a nibble any more than I can! Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 5:26
  • 2
    @NateEldredge: That's why we're getting 0x4'00'00
    – MSalters
    Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 13:01
17

In context:

// ASM API versions

int ASM4 = 4 << 16 | 0 << 8 | 0;
int ASM5 = 5 << 16 | 0 << 8 | 0;

Yes, this is equivalent to

int ASM4 = 4 << 16;
int ASM5 = 5 << 16;

This is just written that way to make it clear that we are setting the 3rd byte to 4, and both lower bytes to 0. Alternatively, that it is a version number that should be read as 4.0.0.

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    Interesting how it sometimes works on SO. You said pretty much the same as the accepted answer, and posted it even a little earlier.
    – Levite
    Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 8:00
  • I had to read this answer to the last sentence to get the point. Then i noticed the grey-on-grey comment line hinted at the answer. Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 14:13
10

It indeed serves no purpose, but then it is neatly and visually aligned so that the ASM developers know about the opcodes versions (if I'm not mistaken, this is the OpCodes interface you're looking at here).

The same way that you'd use 1 << 0 vs 1 << 1, etc.

3
  • 2
    I wonder if they've heard of commenting? Either way, this seems like the most likely explanation. Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 18:21
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    @christopher even if they did, well, as the saying goes, code talks ;)
    – fge
    Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 18:23
  • @christopher This is pretty standard in embedded development. If you're setting bits for any reason (eg, driving a peripheral), it's important to be clear that you're explicitly writing a zero rather than just forgetting that the particular bit is relevant.
    – sapi
    Commented Feb 17, 2015 at 8:15

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