5
long long llIdx = foo();
if (llIdx > 0LL) // Can I use 0 here?
  ...

Is there any problem if I use 0 instead of 0LL in above code?

When should I prefer 0LL over 0?

  • 1
    long long is a signed type. It makes no difference if you write x > 0ll or x > 0, because 0 is automatically promoted to a long long. – kay Feb 17 '15 at 0:26
  • Actually, the "signedness" of long long doesn't matter for this specific case. If the comparison was llIdx >= 0 (or 0LL) it would, because that predicate would always be true for unsigned long long. – kdopen Feb 17 '15 at 0:38
12

Yes, you can use a plain 0 here. The compiler would look at the type of each argument to > and promote the smaller one so that they are the same size.

Thus llIdx > 0 and llIdx > 0LL are equivalent.

  • "The compiler would look at the type of each argument to > and promote the smaller one so that they are the same size." That's why I didn't put my comment as an answer. There is a bunch of special cases if the sign of both integers vary. – kay Feb 17 '15 at 0:28
  • 1
    Didn't see your comment while I was typing :) I was just trying to answer the specific question with a little more than "yes". And I presume you meant "signedness", not "sign" – kdopen Feb 17 '15 at 0:31
  • So when we should use 0LL instead of 0? – Deqing Feb 17 '15 at 3:52
  • @Deqing: I can't come up with a good example where usual arithmetic conversion does something unexpected if one operand has value 0. Variadic arguments are one (e.g. printf("%lld", 0LL);), and unsigned n; int i; ... long long l = 0LL + n + i; (if long long covers the range of unsigned int, what it probably always does, this prevents promotion of i to unsigned). – mafso Feb 17 '15 at 10:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.