48

Is there a way to catch failed to load resource: net::ERR_CONNECTION_REFUSED, I've tried:

try {
  $.post('',{},function(res) {
  }).fail(function (xhr, textStatus, errorThrown) { 
    xhr.textStatus = textStatus;
    xhr.errorThrown = errorThrown;
    console.log('fail',xhr);
    // how to get the 'ERR_CONNECTION_REFUSED' or anything else as string?
  });
} catch(e) {
  console.log('catch',e);
}

The fail function could catch, but I got no information about the error, either it is:

  • ERR_NAME_NOT_RESOLVED
  • ERR_CONNECTION_REFUSED
  • ERR_BLOCKED_BY_CLIENT
  • ERR_TUNNEL_CONNECTION_FAILED (when using proxy)

or anything else.. the question would be, how to get the kind of error?

  • 3
    You won't get specific information about the error, by intent (because otherwise it may be abused to gain insight into the user's internal network, for instance). – robertklep Jul 22 '15 at 10:17
15

I even tried to achieve the goal using javascript XMLHttpRequest()

var xhttp= new XMLHttpRequest();
try{
  xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
    console.log(xhttp);
    if (xhttp.readyState == 4 && xhttp.status == 0) {
      alert("Unknown Error Occured. Server response not received.");
    }
  };
  xhttp.open("POST", "http://localhost:8080/data", true);
  xhttp.send();
}catch(e){
  console.log('catch', e);
}

Above snippet only gives generic error handling, while I am not getting exact reason behind the error. The try...catch statement fails to catch anything, because none of the functions inside try block is throwing any exceptions. It seems XMLHttpRequest is running in background thread, so its runtime error in not being catchable.

As jQuery is a library which is actually a javascript, it will also behave same for $.post() because $.post() is also using XMLHttpRequest behind the curtain.

Below is the jQuery version, which also will handle generic error, as we can not exactly know reason for error.

try {
  $.post('http://localhost:8080/data', {}, function(res) {}).fail(function() {
      alert("Unknown Error Occured. Server response not received.");
  });
} catch (e) {
  console.log('catch', e);
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

Conclusion

As javascript XMLHttpRequest() is still not efficient enough for handling different error states, we can not know exact reason behind the network error for AJAX requests. We can only capture generic errors and some other known status codes like

"404" for file not found

"500" for server not responding

More can be known from https://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec10.html

  • 2
    I am pretty sure that the state() has nothing to do with the network, but with the Deferred object. The "rejected" means that the deferred object has been rejected instead of resolved. – Claudio Jan 24 '16 at 11:04
  • Ok I got it. Thanks for mentioning @Claudio. Can you suggest any way to check rejection by network? – Kiran Shakya Jan 24 '16 at 11:52
  • Nope :( I am struggling behind that problem too, and unfortunately there isn't a solution that I can think of. Maybe I will investigate websocket to see if the diagnosis of a network problem could be a bit more interesting... – Claudio Jan 24 '16 at 12:31
  • 3
    You should probably delete this answer since it does not answer the question. – Zero3 Feb 4 '16 at 9:44
  • @Zero3 I am currently trying to modify the answer so that it can meet the question requirement. If I fail, then I may delete the answer. If you know any answer, you may post below. I will delete the answer as soon as I see one. – Kiran Shakya Feb 4 '16 at 9:55
5
var xhttp= new XMLHttpRequest();
xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
console.log(xhttp);

xhttp.onerror = function(e){
    alert("Unknown Error Occured. Server response not received.");
};

xhttp.open("POST", "http://localhost:8080/data", true);
xhttp.send();

An alternative way of getting errors that might be easier to understand later is the onerror event handler. From what I have seen, it won't give you any more useful information than Kirans solution.

  • Thanks, at least it detects that an error occurred (unlike try-catch around .send which doensn't seem to catch). My only concern is browser support for this. If not available, how else would you detect a network level error apart from using timeouts? Might be worth checking how $.ajax detects it before failing the promise. – Shane Dec 4 '17 at 5:07
0

You have access to online/offline in chrome.

var _Network_state = true;
    function updateIndicator() {
        // Show a different icon based on offline/online
        if (navigator.onLine) { // true|false
            // ... do other stuff
            _Network_state = true;
        } else {
            // ... do other stuff
            _Network_state = false;
        }
        console.info(_Network_state ? 'Online' : 'Offline');
    }
    // Update the online status icon based on connectivity
    window.addEventListener('online',  updateIndicator);
    window.addEventListener('offline', updateIndicator);
    updateIndicator();

Before call ajax, inspect "_Network_state"

  • How about browsers OTHER than Chrome - something that only works in one particular browser is less than 1/2 a answer. – Paul Gorbas Aug 30 at 0:47

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