5

Word description (code below): I have a library that provides a collection of classes. For each group of class we have two concrete types, (ClassA_Partial, ClassA), (ClassB_Partial, ClassB) etc. Each of these implements (Interface_Partial, Interface) respectively. Additionally, Interface is a Interface_Partial and each Class? is a Class?_Partial - creating a diamond inheritance pattern where the top is inherited virtually.

Why areInterface_Partial functions ambiguous when inheriting both ClassA and ClassB?

struct Interface_Partial
{ 
    virtual ~Interface_Partial(); 
    virtual void f() = 0;
};

struct Interface
    :
    virtual Interface_Partial
{
    virtual void g() = 0;
};


struct ClassA_Partial : public virtual Interface_Partial
{
    void f() {};
};


struct ClassA : public Interface, public virtual ClassA_Partial
{
    void g() {};
};

struct ClassB_Partial : public virtual Interface_Partial
{
    void f() {};
};


struct ClassB : public Interface, public virtual ClassB_Partial
{
    void g() {};
};

struct MyClass : public ClassA, public ClassB
{ }; // error C2250: MyClass : ambiguous inheritance of 'void Interface_Partial::f(void)'

Why can't we disambiguate the way we usually do when we inherit a common interface more than once? For example

struct ClassX : public Interface_Partial { void f() {} };
struct ClassY : public Interface_Partial { void f() {} };
class Another : public ClassX, public ClassY
{};

void func()
{
    // This is ok
    Another a;
    a.ClassX::f();   

    // Why would this not work?
    // unambiguously refers to the one and only f() function 
    // inherited via  ClassA
    MyClass b;
    b.ClassA::f();   
}
1
  • Luckily the 'library' in the above example is my own code - and I'm already getting rid of the diamond inheritance just to preserve my sanity. However - I am interested in the technical reasons why the above doesn't work.
    – Zero
    Feb 17, 2015 at 7:39

2 Answers 2

5

Because of the virtual inheritance, there is only one vtable for the base class Interface_Partial - once you use virtual inheritance, the "virtualness" infects all derived classes at all levels

The inheritance is ambigous because MyClass has two different version of f() available - one from ClassA and one from ClassB. Because of the virtual inheritance of Interface_Partial, you have two derived-class implementations that are at the same level and are trying to override the same virtual function. Declaring a virtual base class makes all derived classes share the virtual base class, including its vtable. The shared vtable gets updated to contain the pointer of the virtual function which should be called. But since there are two equally "good" ones to choose from, there is no way to pick one over the other.

In the other example you give, Interface_Partial is a non-virtual base class for ClassX and ClassY, so each class is overriding a completely different virtual function. This is unambigous to the compiler, although when you call them, you have to specify which specific f() you want to call.

You can resolve this by providing an implementation of f() in MyClass.

4
  • I don't understand how that is different from the Another class example where we inherit ClassX and ClassY without ambiguity, despite having two derived class implementations at the same level. Could you clarify that a little?
    – Zero
    Feb 17, 2015 at 21:57
  • So is it the case that the virtual inheritance passes down to child classes? Even if I only want to know about ClassA and ClassB - I still need to know that each of those virtually inherits f(), meaning that if I non-virtual inherit ClassA and ClassB the compiler is still trying to virtually inherit both f() and resolve a single function even though I actually want both ClassA::f() and ClassB::f() ?
    – Zero
    Feb 18, 2015 at 23:08
  • 2
    @Zero, because of the virtual inheritance, there is only one vtable for the base class Interface_Partial - once you use virtual inheritance, the "virtualness" infects all derived classes at all levels. Feb 20, 2015 at 9:27
  • 1
    I added your previous comment to the answer - because for me that was the one piece of information I really didn't understand. Thanks.
    – Zero
    Feb 23, 2015 at 2:23
4

To answer your both question we need to understand the working of virtual function -

If you draw the vtable for each class than you can understand why it is throwing the ambiguous inheritance error

enter image description here

For Interface_Partial: It’s Vtable will contain the address of function f() with its own definition i.e. Interface_Partial :: f().

In Interface class/structure: It has function g() with its own definition along with inherited function f() from Interface_Partial which it has not override . So the Vtable of Interface class will have address of two function as :

  1>    g() as  Interface :: g()

  2>    f() as  Interface_Partial :: f()

Now Come to ClassA_Partial : It has override the function f() from its parent class and gave its own definition so the vtable of ClassA_Partial will have functions f() as :

ClassA_Partial :: f()

Now the main Part :

If you see the ClassA it has inherited from Interface and ClassA_Partial and overrides the g() but not f(). So when compiler sees this, it will be confused because now it will have two definition of f()

 1> as   Interface_Partial :: f()   
 2> as   ClassA_Partial :: f()

Which one to choose ? Interface_Partial or ClassA_Partial ! So it throws an error even if you do as

 b.ClassA::f();

Because of two different versions of f()

2
  • 1
    I still don't fully understand your explanation. If I instantiate ClassA then ClassA::f() is unambiguous because of the virtual inhertiance, so I would still have thought b.ClassA::f() is unambiguous.
    – Zero
    Feb 18, 2015 at 23:26
  • 1
    Because ClassA is having two definition of function f(), one from Interface_Partial and other from ClassA_Partial. Since you are inheriting Interface and ClassA_Partial using virutal so they will have one copy of function f() BUT classA_Partial has override the f() and created it's own version of f(), Now when you inherit these two Interface and ClassA_Partial, In Class A you'll get two different version of f().
    – A J
    Feb 19, 2015 at 5:14

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