29

Am trying to upload my file via:

console.log("not broken til here");
    scope.inputMemeIsFile=true;
    var bucket = new AWS.S3({params: {Bucket: 'townhall.images'}});
    file = image.file;
    console.log(file);

    var params = {Key: file.name, ContentType: file.type, Body: file};
      bucket.upload(params, function (err, data) {
        var result = err ? 'ERROR!' : 'UPLOADED.';
        console.log(result);
        console.log(err);
      });

However, am getting the following error:

XMLHttpRequest cannot load https://s3.amazonaws.com/<BUCKETNAME>/favicon.jpg. No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource. Origin 'http://127.0.0.1:5000' is therefore not allowed access.

with the proceedingError: Network Failure {message: "Network Failure", code: "NetworkingError", time: Tue Feb 17 2015 13:37:06 GMT-0500 (EST), region: "us-east-1", hostname: "s3.amazonaws.com"…}

My CORS config looks like the following and I have tried a couple things with no luck.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<CORSConfiguration xmlns="http://s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2006-03-01/">
    <CORSRule>
        <AllowedOrigin>http://*</AllowedOrigin>
        <AllowedOrigin>https://*</AllowedOrigin>
        <AllowedMethod>GET</AllowedMethod>
        <AllowedMethod>POST</AllowedMethod>
        <AllowedMethod>PUT</AllowedMethod>
        <AllowedHeader>*</AllowedHeader>
    </CORSRule>
</CORSConfiguration>

Anyone have any idea whats wrong? I've looked at 5-6 similar posts but no one seems to be able to solve the problem.

45

In order to upload files via browser, you should ensure that you have configured CORS for your Amazon S3 bucket and exposed the "ETag" header via the ETag declaration.

I would suggest you start with an open test configuration and then modifying it to your needs:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<CORSConfiguration xmlns="http://s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2006-03-01/">
  <CORSRule>
    <AllowedOrigin>*</AllowedOrigin>
    <AllowedMethod>HEAD</AllowedMethod>
    <AllowedMethod>GET</AllowedMethod>
    <AllowedMethod>PUT</AllowedMethod>
    <AllowedMethod>POST</AllowedMethod>
    <AllowedMethod>DELETE</AllowedMethod>
    <AllowedHeader>*</AllowedHeader>
    <ExposeHeader>ETag</ExposeHeader>
  </CORSRule>
</CORSConfiguration>

Then check your bucket permissions and your AWS configuration (accessKeyId, secretAccessKey, and region) since none of these are present in your snippet.

For testing, go to your IAM Management Console and create a new IAM user named prefix-townhall-test then create a group with this simple policy that grants access to a bucket:

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": ["s3:ListBucket"],
      "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::test-bucket-name"]
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:PutObject",
        "s3:GetObject",
        "s3:DeleteObject"
      ],
      "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::test-bucket-name/*"]
    }
  ]
}

Make sure the user you created is using the new group with this policy.

Now create a simple test script like the one used on amazon this:

HTML

<input id="file-chooser" type="file" />
<button id="upload-button">Upload</button>
<p id="results"></p>

CODE (on DOM ready)

// update credentials
var credentials = {accessKeyId: 'new accessKeyId', secretAccessKey: 'new secretAccessKey'};
AWS.config.update(credentials);
AWS.config.region = 'us-west-1';

// create bucket instance
var bucket = new AWS.S3({params: {Bucket: 'test-bucket-name'}});

var fileChooser = document.getElementById('file-chooser');
var button = document.getElementById('upload-button');
var results = document.getElementById('results');
button.addEventListener('click', function() {
    var file = fileChooser.files[0];
    if (file) {
        results.innerHTML = '';

        var params = {Key: file.name, ContentType: file.type, Body: file};
        bucket.upload(params, function (err, data) {
            results.innerHTML = err ? 'ERROR!' : 'UPLOADED.';
        });
    } else {
        results.innerHTML = 'Nothing to upload.';
    }
}, false);
|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Have tried the ETag variation too and the one you stated above, same problem. – John Feb 17 '15 at 19:39
  • In terms of the config... <script type="text/javascript"> // See the Configuring section to configure credentials in the SDK AWS.config.update({accessKeyId: '<FIRST_KEY>', secretAccessKey: '<OTHER_KEY>'}); //AWS.config.region = 'us-west-2'; </script>. Any idea what I am doing wrong? – John Feb 17 '15 at 19:40
  • 1
    @user3525295 I've updated my answer to give you a small test environment. It works for me with javascript AWS SDK and allows me to upload just fine. If you want, I can even put the example in a fiddle but, will probably delete the user eventually. – jungy Feb 17 '15 at 20:44
  • 2
    @user3525295 your error seems to be stating that the bucket is isn't in us-east-1. Can you make sure the request is going to us-west or whichever Northern California is. Let me make a test bucket in Northern California and test it out. – jungy Feb 17 '15 at 20:59
  • 1
    @user3525295 I just tested in Northern California and it worked fine with AWS.config.region = 'us-west-1'; and the bucket using the example CORS configuration. – jungy Feb 17 '15 at 21:12
10

Some browsers, such as Chrome, do not support localhost or 127.0.0.1 for CORS requests.

Try using instead: http://lvh.me:5000/

See https://stackoverflow.com/a/10892392/1464716 for more.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Just tired, same effect. This was a good suggestion though and one I have not tried, any other suggestions? – John Feb 17 '15 at 19:38
  • This actually worked for me. I tried with the suggested CORS header in Safari instead of Chrome and voila. – jimh Oct 22 '19 at 7:10
2

Try <AllowedOrigin>*</AllowedOrigin>, without protocol.

If it has no effect – you probably have problem on client side.

|improve this answer|||||
  • I've tried it already. Could you elaborate on how you would solve the client side problem? – John Feb 17 '15 at 19:38
  • 3
    Possibly, your client cached in some way <MaxAgeSeconds>ZillionSeconds</MaxAgeSeconds> if you had it in CORSRules section. Even if you delete it after client cached its value, browser do not try to re-read CORS using OPTIONS request until ZillionSeconds period ends. To ensure OPTIONS request you may a) clear user agent cache, b) for Chrome – open console, then settings and set No cache while console is open. – ermouth Feb 17 '15 at 19:45
  • I have my javascript console on and the cache is deleted. – John Feb 17 '15 at 19:46
1

Have you tried specifying your origin instead of using wildcard. I'm pretty sure we had similar problems in the past.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<CORSConfiguration xmlns="http://s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2006-03-01/">
    <CORSRule>
        <AllowedOrigin>http://127.0.0.1:5000</AllowedOrigin>
        <AllowedMethod>GET</AllowedMethod>
        <AllowedMethod>POST</AllowedMethod>
        <AllowedMethod>PUT</AllowedMethod>
        <AllowedHeader>*</AllowedHeader>
    </CORSRule>
</CORSConfiguration>
|improve this answer|||||

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