This question already has an answer here:

in a for-loop with % to get a saw function, for example using a period of 5 printing 2 cycles would look like this:

for(auto i = 0; i < 5 * 2; ++i) cout << i % 5 << endl;

Results in:

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I want a function returns a triangle wave, so for some function foo:

for(auto i = 0; i < 5 * 2; ++i) cout << foo(i, 5) << endl;

Would result in:

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Is there such a function, or do I need to come up with my own?

marked as duplicate by CoryKramer, Wintermute, eerorika, Baum mit Augen, Lior Kogan Feb 19 '15 at 12:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • could look like abs(((i + 2) % 5) - 2) except it gives 0 1 2 2 1 0 1 2 ... – njzk2 Feb 18 '15 at 16:24

Looks like a very similar question was answered here: Is there a one-line function that generates a triangle wave?

Taken from Noldorin answer:

Triangular Wave

y = abs((x++ % 6) - 3);

This gives a triangular wave of period 6, oscillating between 3 and 0.

Now put that in a function:

int foo(int inputPosition, int period, int amplitude)
{
    return abs((inputPosition % period) - amplitude);
}
  • Your function's a little wak there bro. It not only fails to take the input I specified in the question, it also fails to compile cause x isn't defined. In any event Cyber did do a good job finding that duplicate. – Jonathan Mee Feb 18 '15 at 16:57
  • Right, I just noticed that right before I read your comment. I edited it and should be fixed now. – Hans Goldman Feb 18 '15 at 17:01
  • Getting closer, It still doesn't match the signature specified in the question but it compiles now. (I know we can all imply what you should be doing in foo, but we also could have all followed Cyber's link and implied an foo from there. If you're going to use someone else's solution to answer this question, it seems like you should at least tailor their answer to the actual question.) – Jonathan Mee Feb 18 '15 at 17:07
  • Sorry, I was already writing the answer when Cyber posted the link. I wasn't just taking it from him. You probably should have done a 2 second Google search before even asking the question. Because that's how long it took me to find that link on my own. Just my 2 cents... – Hans Goldman Feb 18 '15 at 17:12
  • I believe you are correct that I should have taken more time to research, my mistake. Anyway back to working on this answer; it's close to right, have a look at Eric Bainville's answer that's the one you want to copy. – Jonathan Mee Feb 18 '15 at 18:32

You'd have to make your own:

// Assumes 0 <= i < n
int foo(int i, int n) {
    int ix = i % n;
    if ( ix < n/2 )
        return ix;
    else
        return n-1-ix;
}
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I thought we should at least post the correct answer here before this question is closed cause it is a duplicate.

Eric Bainvile's answer is the correct one.

int foo(const int position, const int period){return period - abs(position % (2 * period) - period);}

However this gives a triangle wave with a range from [0, period] and a frequency of 2 * period and I want a range from [0, period / 2] and a cycle of period. This can be accomplished by just passing half of the period to foo or by adjusting the function:

int foo(const int position, const int period){return period / 2 - abs(position % period - period / 2);}

With such a simple function inlining seems preferable though so our final result will be:

for(auto position = 0; position < 5 * 2; ++position) cout << 5 / 2 - abs(position % 5 - 5 / 2) << endl;

Yielding the requested:

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0

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