-1

This may be a strange question but I really want to learn how "ping" command works. Today when I had my smartphone open and online, I pinged its external(public) IP from my terminal in Linux with "ping [ip address]" command and it worked of course. When I turned off my smartphone and retried to ping its IP, it worked again! As far as I know ping is like sending a message and then getting a reply from the target.How is this possible since my phone is offline? Any explanation is much appreciated! Thanks!

UPDATE: Both my phone and PC use Wifi to connect to the internet and are in the same network. Also there was not any other device that joined the network when I tried the above.

  • 1
    what "external" ip? Cell network? Wifi? What makes you think that IP is actually your phone? Pretty much every wifi network and cellular network uses NAT gateways... And generally speaking, your question boils down to "my plate is empty. can I eat the cake that doesn't exist on the plate?" – Marc B Feb 18 '15 at 17:03
  • The other option of course, is that a different phone joined the network, and you pinged that, if the network aggressively reuses addresses... – Rowland Shaw Feb 18 '15 at 17:19
  • Both my phone and PC use Wifi to connect to the internet and are in the same network. Also there was not any other device that joined the network when I tried the above. – ELMutant21 Feb 18 '15 at 17:25
0

If you subscribe the service from an ISP, then you might share the use of one public IP address among your devices to connect to the Internet. Internally you'll use private IP addresses for your PC and phone. It seems to me that what you have pinged was the public IP address assigned on the gateway of your wifi router and not your phone. If you are not sure, then try to access http://whatismyipaddress.com/ from both your devices and see if you have the same IP address or not.

  • Probably that's what is happening. I ping the gateway's IP.Thanks for explaining! – ELMutant21 Feb 19 '15 at 14:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.