14

When designing a RESTful API, what to do if a GET request only makes sense if there are specific parameters associated with the request? Should the parameters be passed as a query string, and if so, what to do when all the parameters aren't specified or are formatted incorrectly?

For example, lets say i have a Post resource, which can be accessed by `api/posts` endpoint. Each post has a geographical location, and posts can be retrieved ONLY when specifying an area that the posts may reside in. Thus, 3 parameters are required: latitude, longitude and radius.

I can think of 2 options in this case:
1. Putting the parameters in query string: api/posts/?lat=5.54158&lng=71.5486&radius=10
2. Putting the parameters in the URL: api/posts/lat/5.54158/lng/71.5486/radius/10

Which of these would be the correct approach? It seems wrong to put required parameters in the query string, but the latter approach feels somewhat 'uglier'.

PS. I'm aware there are many discussion on this topic already (for example: REST API Best practices: Where to put parameters?), but my question is specifically addressed to the case when parameters are required, not optional.

2

When designing a RESTful API, what to do if a GET request only makes sense if there are specific parameters associated with the request? Should the parameters be passed as a query string, and if so, what to do when all the parameters aren't specified or are formatted incorrectly?

By REST your API must fulfill the REST constraints, which are described in the Fielding dissertation. One of these constraints is the uniform interface constraint, which includes the HATEOAS constraint. According to the HATEOAS constraint your API must serve a standard hypermedia format as response. This hypermedia contains hyperlinks (e.g. HTML links, forms) annotated with metadata (e.g. link relation or RDF annotation). The clients check the metadata, which explains to them what the hyperlink does. After that they can decide whether they want to follow the link or not. When they follow the link, they can build the HTTP request based on the URI template, parameters, etc... and send it to the REST service.

In your case it does not matter which URI structure you use, it is for service usage only, since the client always uses the given URI template and the client does not care what is in that template until it is a valid URI template which it can fill with parameters.

In most of the cases your client has enough validation information to test whether the params are incorrect or missing. In that case it does not send a HTTP request, so you have nothing to do in the service. If an invalid param gets through, then in your case your service sends back a 404 - not found, since the URI is the resource identifier, and no resource belongs to an invalid URI (generated from the given URI template and invalid params).

  • 1
    But, it is also suggested that when you want to return a 404 error when the parameter value does not correspond to an existing resource then a path segment parameter should be used. Have a look at the first answer in the following question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4024271/… – stensootla Feb 19 '15 at 7:43
  • @StenSootla You are right "The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent." So in this case 404 is the good response. 400 is by malformed request body. – inf3rno Feb 19 '15 at 9:42
  • I'm sorry, i didn't quite understand your last comment. You are saying that i should pass the paramaters as query string (since the parameters are not hierarchical) and when some of them are missing or badly formatted, i should send back a response with 404 status code. However, if you look at the other stackoverflow question i mentioned in my previous comment, the top answerer there specifically said that when the 404 error is returned, the parameters shoud be part of the url path, instead of query string. – stensootla Feb 19 '15 at 10:26
  • @StenSootla I guess you misunderstood. 404 should not have a body. I was talking about the form description the client uses to build the URI, should contain the validation data as well. – inf3rno Feb 19 '15 at 10:39
  • Yes, ofcourse i'm validating the data client side, too. But this doesn't mean i shouldn't design my REST api to handle the case when incorrect parameters still get through. I think i'm missing your point entirely :d ? – stensootla Feb 19 '15 at 10:45
13

The first approach is better.

api/posts/?lat=5.54158&lng=71.5486&radius=10



The second approach is a little misleading.

api/posts/lat/5.54158/lng/71.5486/radius/10

You should think of each of your directories as resources. In this cause, sub-resources (for example: "api/posts/lat/5.54158") are not really resources and thus misleading. There are cases where this pattern is a better solution, but looking at what's given, I'd go with using the query string. Unless you have some entity linking to link you directly to this URL, I don't really like it.

4

You should put everything in the query string and set the server to return an error code when not receiving the 3 required parameters.

Because it's a group of parameter that identify an object.

Taking the example: lat=5.54158; lng=71.5486 radius=10

It would be very unlikely to this url make sense:

api/posts/lat/5.54158/lng/yyyy/radius/zz

It's different than:

api/memb/35/..

because the member with id 35 can have a lot of functions ( so, valid urls ) as:

api/memb/35/status or api/memb/35/lastlogin

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.