8

I'm working with The AWS Command Line Interface for DynamoDB.

When we query an item, we get a very detailed JSON output. You get something like this (it has been built from the get-item in order to be almost exhaustive (the NULL type has been omitted) aws command line help:

{
    "Count": 1, 
    "Items": [
        {
            "Id": {
                "S": "app1"
            }, 
            "Parameters": {
                "M": {
                    "nfs": {
                        "M": {
                            "IP" : {
                                "S" : "172.16.0.178"
                            }, 
                            "defaultPath": {
                                "S": "/mnt/ebs/"
                            },
                            "key": {
                                "B": "dGhpcyB0ZXh0IGlzIGJhc2U2NC1lbmNvZGVk"
                            },
                            "activated": {
                                "BOOL": true 
                            }
                        }
                    },
                    "ws" : {
                        "M" : {
                            "number" : {
                                "N" : "5"
                            },
                            "values" : {
                                "L" : [
                                    { "S" : "12253456346346"},
                                    { "S" : "23452353463464"},
                                    { "S" : "23523453461232"},
                                    { "S" : "34645745675675"},
                                    { "S" : "46456745757575"}
                                ]
                            }
                        } 
                    }
                }
            },
            "Oldtypes": {
                "typeSS" : {"SS" : ["foo", "bar", "baz"]},
                "typeNS" : {"NS" : ["0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5"]},
                "typeBS" : {"BS" : ["VGVybWluYXRvcgo=", "VGVybWluYXRvciAyOiBKdWRnbWVudCBEYXkK", "VGVybWluYXRvciAzOiBSaXNlIG9mIHRoZSBNYWNoaW5lcwo=", "VGVybWluYXRvciA0OiBTYWx2YXRpb24K","VGVybWluYXRvciA1OiBHZW5lc2lzCg=="]}
            }
        }
    ], 
    "ScannedCount": 1, 
    "ConsumedCapacity": null
}

Is there any way to get a simpler output for the Items part? Like this:

{
    "ConsumedCapacity": null,
    "Count": 1,
    "Items": [
        {
            "Id": "app1",
            "Parameters": {
                "nfs": {
                    "IP": "172.16.0.178",
                    "activated": true,
                    "defaultPath": "/mnt/ebs/",
                    "key": "dGhpcyB0ZXh0IGlzIGJhc2U2NC1lbmNvZGVk"
                },
                "ws": {
                    "number": 5,
                    "values": ["12253456346346","23452353463464","23523453461232","34645745675675","46456745757575"]
                }
            },
            "Oldtypes": {
                "typeBS": ["VGVybWluYXRvcgo=", "VGVybWluYXRvciAyOiBKdWRnbWVudCBEYXkK", "VGVybWluYXRvciAzOiBSaXNlIG9mIHRoZSBNYWNoaW5lcwo=", "VGVybWluYXRvciA0OiBTYWx2YXRpb24K", "VGVybWluYXRvciA1OiBHZW5lc2lzCg=="],
                "typeNS": [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
                "typeSS": ["foo","bar","baz"]
            }
        }
    ],
    "ScannedCount": 1
}

There is nothing helpful in the dynamodb - AWS CLI 1.7.10 documentation.

We must get the result from the command line. I'm willing to use other command line tools like jq if necessary, but such a jq mapping appears to complicated to me.


Update 1: jq based solution (with help from DanielH's answer)

With jq it is easy, but not quite pretty, you can do something like:

$> aws dynamodb query --table-name ConfigCatalog --key-conditions '{ "Id" : {"AttributeValueList": [{"S":"app1"}], "ComparisonOperator": "EQ"}}' | jq -r '.Items[0].Parameters.M."nfs#IP".S'

Result will be: 172.16.0.178

The jq -r option gives you a raw output.


Update 2: jq based solution (with help from @jeff-mercado)

Here is an updated and commented version of Jeff Mercado jq function to unmarshall DynamoDB output. It will give you the expected output:

$> cat unmarshal_dynamodb.jq
def unmarshal_dynamodb:
  # DynamoDB string type
  (objects | .S)

  # DynamoDB blob type
  // (objects | .B)

  # DynamoDB number type
  // (objects | .N | strings | tonumber)

  # DynamoDB boolean type
  // (objects | .BOOL)

  # DynamoDB map type, recursion on each item
  // (objects | .M | objects | with_entries(.value |= unmarshal_dynamodb))

  # DynamoDB list type, recursion on each item
  // (objects | .L | arrays | map(unmarshal_dynamodb))

  # DynamoDB typed list type SS, string set
  // (objects | .SS | arrays | map(unmarshal_dynamodb))

  # DynamoDB typed list type NS, number set
  // (objects | .NS | arrays | map(tonumber))

  # DynamoDB typed list type BS, blob set
  // (objects | .BS | arrays | map(unmarshal_dynamodb))

  # managing others DynamoDB output entries: "Count", "Items", "ScannedCount" and "ConsumedCapcity"
  // (objects | with_entries(.value |= unmarshal_dynamodb))
  // (arrays | map(unmarshal_dynamodb))

  # leaves values
  // .
  ;
unmarshal_dynamodb

If you save the DynamoDB query output to a file, lets say ddb-query-result.json, you can execute to get desired result:

$> jq -f unmarshal_dynamodb.jq ddb-query-result.json
  • 1
    Hmm, so is it that the object's key names indicate their types? Like "S" is for strings, "M" is for maps, and "N" for numbers? You can actually do something really nice with that. – Jeff Mercado Feb 21 '15 at 2:02
  • Your unmarshal_dynamodb.jq solution is brilliant and credit goes to you & @JeffMercado. One flaw in using the // that I've been trying to resolve is that any filter that returns false doesn't get transformed. This matters with boolean values that are actually set to false - they keep the BOOL or B key. I've added a line to partially resolve this, but still haven't found a way to fully fix it without a second pass: // (objects | if has("BOOL") or has("B") then [false] else null end) This adds false as a 1-element array and needs to go before the "# managing others..." line. – Dave Stern Apr 25 '15 at 1:17
  • 1
    @DaveStern: I revised the method used here to properly handle falsy values. And should now have an overall cleaner implementation. – Jeff Mercado Oct 11 '17 at 23:59
9

You can decode the values recursively with a well crafted function. It looks like the key names correspond to a type:

S -> string
N -> number
M -> map

Handle each of the cases you want to decode if possible, otherwise filter it out. You can make use of the various type filters and the alternative operator to do so.

$ cat input.json
{
  "Count": 1,
  "Items": [
    {
      "Id": { "S": "app1" },
      "Parameters": {
        "M": {
          "nfs#IP": { "S": "192.17.0.13" },
          "maxCount": { "N": "1" },
          "nfs#defaultPath": { "S": "/mnt/ebs/" }
        }
      }
    }
  ],
  "ScannedCount": 1,
  "ConsumedCapacity": null
}
$ cat ~/.jq
def decode_ddb:
    def _sprop($key): select(keys == [$key])[$key];                 # single property objects only
       ((objects | { value: _sprop("S") })                          # string (from string)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("B") })                           # blob (from string)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("N") | tonumber })                # number (from string)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("BOOL") })                        # boolean (from boolean)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("M") | map_values(decode_ddb) })  # map (from object)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("L") | map(decode_ddb) })         # list (from encoded array)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("SS") })                          # string set (from string array)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("NS") | map(tonumber) })          # number set (from string array)
    // (objects | { value: _sprop("BS") })                          # blob set (from string array)
    // (objects | { value: map_values(decode_ddb) })                # all other non-conforming objects
    // (arrays | { value: map(decode_ddb) })                        # all other non-conforming arrays
    // { value: . }).value                                          # everything else
    ;
$ jq 'decode_ddb' input.json
{
  "Count": 1,
  "Items": [
    {
      "Id": "app1",
      "Parameters": {
        "nfs#IP": "192.17.0.13",
        "maxCount": 1,
        "nfs#defaultPath": "/mnt/ebs/"
      }
    }
  ],
  "ScannedCount": 1,
  "ConsumedCapacity": null
}
  • Thanks to @jeff-mercado's help. I posted an extended version of his decode_ddb.jq function as an update of the original post. – herve Feb 23 '15 at 18:53
0

As far as I know, there is no other output like the "verbose" one you've posted. Therefore I think, you can't avoid intermediate tools like jq oder sed

There are several proposals in this post for converting the raw dynamo data:

Export data from DynamoDB

Maybe you can adapt one of these scripts in conjunction with jq or sed

  • with jq it is easy, but not quiet pretty, you can do something like: aws dynamodb query --table-name ConfigCatalog --key-conditions '{ "Id" : {"AttributeValueList": [{"S":"app1"}], "ComparisonOperator": "EQ"}}' | jq -r '.Items[0].Parameters.M."nfs#IP".S' result will be: 172.16.0.178. See updated post. – herve Feb 20 '15 at 22:13
0

Another way to achieve the post's goal would be to use a node.js extension like node-dynamodb or dynamodb-marshaler and build a node command line tool.

Interesting tutorial to build a node.js command line application with commander package: Creating Your First Node.js Command-line Application

0

Here is another approach. This may be a little brutal but it shows the basic idea.

def unwanted:    ["B","BOOL","M","S","L","BS","SS"];
def fixpath(p):  [ p[] | select( unwanted[[.]]==[] ) ];
def fixnum(p;v):
    if   p[-2]=="NS" then [p[:-2]+p[-1:],(v|tonumber)]
    elif p[-1]=="N" then [p[:-1], (v|tonumber)]
    else [p,v] end;

reduce (tostream|select(length==2)) as [$p,$v] (
    {}
  ; fixnum(fixpath($p);$v) as [$fp,$fv]      
  | setpath($fp;$fv)
)

Try it online!

Sample Run (assuming filter in filter.jq and data in data.json)

$ jq -M -f filter.jq data.json
{
  "ConsumedCapacity": null,
  "Count": 1,
  "Items": [
    {
      "Id": "app1",
      "Oldtypes": {
        "typeBS": [
          "VGVybWluYXRvcgo=",
          "VGVybWluYXRvciAyOiBKdWRnbWVudCBEYXkK",
          "VGVybWluYXRvciAzOiBSaXNlIG9mIHRoZSBNYWNoaW5lcwo=",
          "VGVybWluYXRvciA0OiBTYWx2YXRpb24K",
          "VGVybWluYXRvciA1OiBHZW5lc2lzCg=="
        ],
        "typeNS": [
          0,
          1,
          2,
          3,
          4,
          5
        ],
        "typeSS": [
          "foo",
          "bar",
          "baz"
        ]
      },
      "Parameters": {
        "nfs": {
          "IP": "172.16.0.178",
          "activated": true,
          "defaultPath": "/mnt/ebs/",
          "key": "dGhpcyB0ZXh0IGlzIGJhc2U2NC1lbmNvZGVk"
        },
        "ws": {
          "number": 5,
          "values": [
            "12253456346346",
            "23452353463464",
            "23523453461232",
            "34645745675675",
            "46456745757575"
          ]
        }
      }
    }
  ],
  "ScannedCount": 1
}

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