60

I am using EF7 (Entity Framework Core) in an ASP.NET Core App. Can you please point me to the proper way of executing stored procedures? The old method with ObjectParameters and ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.ExecuteFunction is not working.

  • 1
    You need to run the SP and get some DbSet in result? Or just run it? – haim770 Feb 19 '15 at 9:09
  • I need to get the results back! – eadam Feb 19 '15 at 12:29

14 Answers 14

73

Support for stored procedure in EF7 is resolved now, this also supports mapping of multiple result-sets.

Check here for the fix details

And you can call it like this in c#

var userType = dbContext.Set().FromSql("dbo.SomeSproc @Id = {0}, @Name = {1}", 45, "Ada");
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  • 1
    find another great example here - dotnetjalps.com/2015/11/… This is self explanatory. – Arvin Dec 16 '15 at 12:38
  • Mark this as an answer to help other user recognize that the support is now available. – Arvin Dec 31 '15 at 6:32
  • 1
    Multiple datasets are NOT yet supported. See github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework/issues/… – AperioOculus Apr 1 '16 at 14:39
  • 3
    my 2 cents: var UserId =1; _dbCtx.Set<YourDTOViewModelWhatever>().FromSql($"dbo.StoredProcedureName @UserId= {UserId}"); //just syntax sugar... – hidden Jun 12 '16 at 7:48
  • 10
    See this if you like me cant find fromSql: dotnetthoughts.net/how-to-execute-storedprocedure-in-ef-core "To get the FromSql command, you need to add the reference of “Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Relational” package in your project.json file." Also add using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore; – Ernesto Jan 10 '17 at 17:28
25

Stored procedure support is not yet (as of 7.0.0-beta3) implemented in EF7. You can track the progress of this feature using issue #245.

For now, you can do it the old fashioned way using ADO.NET.

var connection = (SqlConnection)context.Database.AsSqlServer().Connection.DbConnection;

var command = connection.CreateCommand();
command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
command.CommandText = "MySproc";
command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@MyParameter", 42);

command.ExecuteNonQuery();
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  • Thanks. Is it possible to run plain SQL through EF7 ? – eadam Feb 19 '15 at 22:25
  • 2
    That's #624. ;) You can always do it on the ADO.NET connection: context.Database.AsRelational().Connection.DbConnection. – bricelam Feb 19 '15 at 22:38
  • 3
    @JimWooley That seems a little unethical... But yes, use FromSql now. – bricelam Apr 18 '16 at 4:24
  • 5
    @JimWooley LOL, not sure if you're aware of it or not, but you downvoted an answer of one of the main developers in the EF team... :) – gdoron is supporting Monica May 15 '16 at 9:41
  • 2
    @RichardMarskell-Drackir StackOverflow answers are very much a point-in-time thing. Do you really expect everyone to keep all their answers up-to-date for the rest of time? Either the asker should pick a different answer or the community should upvote better ones that come along. Bad form on the downvote. – bricelam Sep 15 '16 at 15:40
23

To execute the stored procedures, use FromSql method which executes RAW SQL queries

e.g.

    var products= context.Products
        .FromSql("EXECUTE dbo.GetProducts")
        .ToList();

To use with parameters

    var productCategory= "Electronics";

    var product = context.Products
        .FromSql("EXECUTE dbo.GetProductByCategory {0}", productCategory)
        .ToList();

or

    var productCategory= new SqlParameter("productCategory", "Electronics");

    var product = context.Product
        .FromSql("EXECUTE dbo.GetProductByName  @productCategory", productCategory)
        .ToList();

There are certain limitations to execute RAW SQL queries or stored procedures. You can’t use it for INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE. if you want to execute INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE queries, use the ExecuteSqlCommand

    var categoryName = "Electronics";
    dataContext.Database
               .ExecuteSqlCommand("dbo.InsertCategory @p0", categoryName);
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6

The support for stored procedure in EF Core is similar to the earlier versions of EF Code first.

You need to create your DbContext class by inherting the DbContext class from EF. The stored procedures are executing using the DbContext.

First step is to write a method that create a DbCommand from the DbContext.

public static DbCommand LoadStoredProc(
  this DbContext context, string storedProcName)
{
  var cmd = context.Database.GetDbConnection().CreateCommand();
  cmd.CommandText = storedProcName;
  cmd.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.StoredProcedure;
  return cmd;
}

To pass parameters to the stored procedure use the following method.

public static DbCommand WithSqlParam(
  this DbCommand cmd, string paramName, object paramValue)
{
  if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(cmd.CommandText))
    throw new InvalidOperationException(
      "Call LoadStoredProc before using this method");
  var param = cmd.CreateParameter();
  param.ParameterName = paramName;
  param.Value = paramValue;
  cmd.Parameters.Add(param);
  return cmd;
}

Finally for mapping the result into a list of custom objects use the MapToList method.

private static List<T> MapToList<T>(this DbDataReader dr)
{
  var objList = new List<T>();
  var props = typeof(T).GetRuntimeProperties();

  var colMapping = dr.GetColumnSchema()
    .Where(x => props.Any(y => y.Name.ToLower() == x.ColumnName.ToLower()))
    .ToDictionary(key => key.ColumnName.ToLower());

  if (dr.HasRows)
  {
    while (dr.Read())
    {
      T obj = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
      foreach (var prop in props)
      {
        var val = 
          dr.GetValue(colMapping[prop.Name.ToLower()].ColumnOrdinal.Value);
          prop.SetValue(obj, val == DBNull.Value ? null : val);
      }
      objList.Add(obj);
    }
  }
  return objList;
}

Now we’re ready for execute the stored procedute with the ExecuteStoredProc method and maps it to the a List whose type that’s passed in as T.

public static async Task<List<T>> ExecuteStoredProc<T>(this DbCommand command)
{
  using (command)
  {
    if (command.Connection.State == System.Data.ConnectionState.Closed)
    command.Connection.Open();
    try
    {
      using (var reader = await command.ExecuteReaderAsync())
      {
        return reader.MapToList<T>();
      }
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
      throw (e);
    }
    finally
    {
      command.Connection.Close();
    }
  }
}

For example, to execute a stored procedure called “StoredProcedureName” with two parameters called “firstparamname” and “secondparamname” this is the implementation.

List<MyType> myTypeList = new List<MyType>();
using(var context = new MyDbContext())
{
  myTypeList = context.LoadStoredProc("StoredProcedureName")
  .WithSqlParam("firstparamname", firstParamValue)
  .WithSqlParam("secondparamname", secondParamValue).
  .ExecureStoredProc<MyType>();
}
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4

"(SqlConnection)context" -- This type-casting no longer works. You can do: "SqlConnection context;

".AsSqlServer()" -- Does not Exist.

"command.ExecuteNonQuery();" -- Does not return results. reader=command.ExecuteReader() does work.

With dt.load(reader)... then you have to switch the framework out of 5.0 and back to 4.51, as 5.0 does not support datatables/datasets, yet. Note: This is VS2015 RC.

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4

I had a lot of trouble with the ExecuteSqlCommand and ExecuteSqlCommandAsync, IN parameters were easy, but OUT parameters were very difficult.

I had to revert to using DbCommand like so -

DbCommand cmd = _context.Database.GetDbConnection().CreateCommand();

cmd.CommandText = "dbo.sp_DoSomething";
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@firstName", SqlDbType.VarChar) { Value = "Steve" });
cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@lastName", SqlDbType.VarChar) { Value = "Smith" });

cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@id", SqlDbType.BigInt) { Direction = ParameterDirection.Output });

I wrote more about it in this post.

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3

Currently EF 7 or EF Core does not support the old method of importing Stored procedures in designer and calling them directly. You can have a look at the roadmap to see what is going to be supported in the future: EF core roadmap.

So for now it is better to use SqlConnection to call stored procedures or any raw query, since you do not need the entire EF for this job. Here are two examples:

Call stored procedure that return single value. String in this case.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[Test]
    @UserName nvarchar(50)
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT 'Name is: '+@UserName;
END

Call stored procedure that return a list.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[TestList]
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT [UserName], [Id] FROM [dbo].[AspNetUsers]
END

To call these stored procedure it is better to create static class that holds all of these functions, for example, I called it DataAccess class, as follows:

public static class DataAccess

    {
        private static string connectionString = ""; //Your connection string
        public static string Test(String userName)
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
            {
                conn.Open();

                // 1.  create a command object identifying the stored procedure
                SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.Test", conn);

                // 2. set the command object so it knows to execute a stored procedure
                cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

                // 3. add parameter to command, which will be passed to the stored procedure
                cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@UserName", userName));

                // execute the command
                using (var rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    if (rdr.Read())
                    {
                        return rdr[0].ToString();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        return null;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        public static IList<Users> TestList()
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
            {
                conn.Open();

                // 1.  create a command object identifying the stored procedure
                SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.TestList", conn);

                // 2. set the command object so it knows to execute a stored procedure
                cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

                // execute the command
                using (var rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    IList<Users> result = new List<Users>();
                    //3. Loop through rows
                    while (rdr.Read())
                    {
                        //Get each column
                        result.Add(new Users() { UserName = (string)rdr.GetString(0), Id = rdr.GetString(1) });
                    }
                    return result;
                }
            }

        }
    }

And Users class is like this:

public class Users
{
     public string UserName { set; get; }
     public string Id { set; get; }
}

By the way you do not need to worry about the performance of opening and closing a connection for every request to sql as the asp.net is taking care of managing these for you. And I hope this was helpful.

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3

I tried all the other solutions but didn't worked for me. But I came to a proper solution and it may be helpful for someone here.

To call a stored procedure and get the result into a list of model in EF Core, we have to follow 3 steps.

Step 1. You need to add a new class just like your entity class. Which should have properties with all the columns in your SP. For example if your SP is returning two columns called Id and Name then your new class should be something like

public class MySPModel
{
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public string Name {get; set;}
}

Step 2.

Then you have to add one DbQuery property into your DBContext class for your SP.

public partial class Sonar_Health_AppointmentsContext : DbContext
{
        public virtual DbSet<Booking> Booking { get; set; } // your existing DbSets
        ...

        public virtual DbQuery<MySPModel> MySP { get; set; } // your new DbQuery
        ...
}

Step 3.

Now you will be able to call and get the result from your SP from your DBContext.

var result = await _context.Query<MySPModel>().AsNoTracking().FromSql(string.Format("EXEC {0} {1}", functionName, parameter)).ToListAsync();

I am using a generic UnitOfWork & Repository. So my function to execute the SP is

/// <summary>
/// Execute function. Be extra care when using this function as there is a risk for SQL injection
/// </summary>
public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> ExecuteFuntion<T>(string functionName, string parameter) where T : class
{
    return await _context.Query<T>().AsNoTracking().FromSql(string.Format("EXEC {0} {1}", functionName, parameter)).ToListAsync();
}

Hope it will be helpful for someone !!!

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  • I was hoping to avoid doing this. I'd written my own libraries (pre EF) to handle dynamic dataset (e.g. joins and the like) then the worked flawlessly. Everyone just whinged so I moved to EF which you can't do that now. Guess what, they asked me to rewrite my libraries. My response wasn't pleasant. – djack109 May 11 at 12:28
2

I found this extention very usefull: StoredProcedureEFCore

Then the usage is like this

List<Model> rows = null;

ctx.LoadStoredProc("dbo.ListAll")
   .AddParam("limit", 300L)
   .AddParam("limitOut", out IOutParam<long> limitOut)
   .Exec(r => rows = r.ToList<Model>());

long limitOutValue = limitOut.Value;

ctx.LoadStoredProc("dbo.ReturnBoolean")
   .AddParam("boolean_to_return", true)
   .ReturnValue(out IOutParam<bool> retParam)
   .ExecNonQuery();

bool b = retParam.Value;

ctx.LoadStoredProc("dbo.ListAll")
   .AddParam("limit", 1L)
   .ExecScalar(out long l);
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1

Using MySQL connector and Entity Framework Core 2.0

My issue was that I was getting an exception like fx. Ex.Message = "The required column 'body' was not present in the results of a 'FromSql' operation.". So, in order to fetch rows via a stored procedure in this manner, you must return all columns for that entity type which the DBSet is associated with, even if you don't need to access all of it for your current request.

var result = _context.DBSetName.FromSql($"call storedProcedureName()").ToList(); 

OR with parameters

var result = _context.DBSetName.FromSql($"call storedProcedureName({optionalParam1})").ToList(); 
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0

Nothing have to do... when you are creating dbcontext for code first approach initialize namespace below the fluent API area make list of sp and use it another place where you want.

public partial class JobScheduleSmsEntities : DbContext
{
    public JobScheduleSmsEntities()
        : base("name=JobScheduleSmsEntities")
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<JobScheduleSmsEntities>(new CreateDatabaseIfNotExists<JobScheduleSmsEntities>());
    }

    public virtual DbSet<Customer> Customers { get; set; }
    public virtual DbSet<ReachargeDetail> ReachargeDetails { get; set; }
    public virtual DbSet<RoleMaster> RoleMasters { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        //modelBuilder.Types().Configure(t => t.MapToStoredProcedures());

        //modelBuilder.Entity<RoleMaster>()
        //     .HasMany(e => e.Customers)
        //     .WithRequired(e => e.RoleMaster)
        //     .HasForeignKey(e => e.RoleID)
        //     .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
    }
    public virtual List<Sp_CustomerDetails02> Sp_CustomerDetails()
    {
        //return ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.ExecuteFunction<Sp_CustomerDetails02>("Sp_CustomerDetails");
        //  this.Database.SqlQuery<Sp_CustomerDetails02>("Sp_CustomerDetails");
        using (JobScheduleSmsEntities db = new JobScheduleSmsEntities())
        {
           return db.Database.SqlQuery<Sp_CustomerDetails02>("Sp_CustomerDetails").ToList();

        }

    }

}

}

public partial class Sp_CustomerDetails02
{
    public long? ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string CustomerID { get; set; }
    public long? CustID { get; set; }
    public long? Customer_ID { get; set; }
    public decimal? Amount { get; set; }
    public DateTime? StartDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime? EndDate { get; set; }
    public int? CountDay { get; set; }
    public int? EndDateCountDay { get; set; }
    public DateTime? RenewDate { get; set; }
    public bool? IsSMS { get; set; }
    public bool? IsActive { get; set; }
    public string Contact { get; set; }
}
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0

in EF Core SP may be executed by FromSQL and by ExecuteSQLCOmmand , like follows:- enter image description here

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0

I'm using Entity Framework Core with my ASP.Net Core 3.x WebAPI. I wanted one of my end points just to execute a particular Stored Procedure, and this is the code I needed:

namespace MikesBank.Controllers
{
    [Route("api/[controller]")]
    [ApiController]
    public class ResetController : ControllerBase
    {
        private readonly MikesBankContext _context;

        public ResetController(MikesBankContext context)
        {
            _context = context;
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public async Task<ActionResult> Get()
        {
            try
            {
                using (DbConnection conn = _context.Database.GetDbConnection())
                {
                    if (conn.State != System.Data.ConnectionState.Open)
                        conn.Open();
                    var cmd = conn.CreateCommand();
                    cmd.CommandText = "Reset_Data";
                    await cmd.ExecuteNonQueryAsync();
                }
                return new OkObjectResult(1);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                return new BadRequestObjectResult(ex.Message);
            }
        }
    }
}

Notice how I need to get my DbContext which has been injected, but I also need to Open() this connection.

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-1

If you are executing a stored procedure from Informix using EntityFrameworkCore you need to include the command EXECUTE PROCEDURE

var spresult = _informixContext.procdata.FromSql("EXECUTE PROCEDURE dummyproc ({0},{1},{2})", parameters: new[] { p0, p1,p2 }).ToList();
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