73

I found a method to convert String to NSNumber, but the code is in Objective-C. I have tried converting it to Swift but it is not working.

The code I am using:

NSNumberFormatter *f = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init];
f.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterDecimalStyle;
NSNumber *myNumber = [f numberFromString:@"42222222222"];

and in Swift I am using it in this way:

var i = NSNumberFormatter.numberFromString("42")

But this code is not working. What am I doing wrong?

1
  • try this NSNumberFormatter().numberFromString("42")!.doubleValue
    – TonyMkenu
    Feb 19, 2015 at 14:27

9 Answers 9

162

Swift 3.0

NSNumber(integer:myInteger) has changed to NSNumber(value:myInteger)

let someString = "42222222222"
if let myInteger = Int(someString) {
    let myNumber = NSNumber(value:myInteger)
}

Swift 2.0

Use the Int() initialiser like this.

let someString = "42222222222"
if let myInteger = Int(someString) {
    let myNumber = NSNumber(integer:myInteger)
    print(myNumber)
} else {
    print("'\(someString)' did not convert to an Int")
}

This can be done in one line if you already know the string will convert perfectly or you just don't care.

let myNumber = Int("42222222222")!

Swift 1.0

Use the toInt() method.

let someString = "42222222222"
if let myInteger = someString.toInt() {
    let myNumber = NSNumber(integer:myInteger)
    println(myNumber)
} else {
    println("'\(someString)' did not convert to an Int")
}
9
  • 1
    my number is long long not interger and replacing interger to longlong shows error? Feb 19, 2015 at 12:17
  • are you saying that your string is not in this format: "42" ?
    – Wez
    Feb 19, 2015 at 12:23
  • 1
    Perhaps you could update your question with a string in the format you want?
    – Wez
    Feb 19, 2015 at 13:09
  • Swap 2.0 and 1.0 answers, placing 2.0 on top. Oct 25, 2015 at 22:38
  • @SwiftArchitect feel free to edit my answer if you feel it could be structured better.
    – Wez
    Oct 25, 2015 at 22:45
16

Or do it just in one line:

NSNumberFormatter().numberFromString("55")!.decimalValue
2
  • 3
    Like David Berry commented below, be careful with creating NSNumberFormatters like this as they are expensive to create. Better caching or using a singleton if using the same formatter more than once. Dec 21, 2017 at 13:13
  • 1
    Has been updated for Swift 5: NumberFormatter().number(from: "55")! Nov 14, 2020 at 23:21
9

In latest Swift:

let number = NumberFormatter().number(from: "1234")
0
8

Swift 2

Try this:

var num = NSNumber(int: Int32("22")!)

Swift 3.x

 NSNumber(value: Int32("22")!)
2
  • 1
    with Swift 3.x this is now.. NSNumber.init( value: Int32("22")!) Aug 25, 2016 at 1:41
  • 2
    no need to initialize with '.init'. simply write: NSNumber(value: Int32("22")!) Apr 25, 2017 at 13:32
6

You can use the following code if you must use NSNumberFormatter. It's simpler to use Wezly's method.

let formatter = NSNumberFormatter()
formatter.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterStyle.DecimalStyle;
if let number = formatter.numberFromString("42") {
    println(number)
}
1
  • 4
    Note also that NSNumberFormatter is expensive to create, and should be cached whenever possible instead of being created every time it's used. Feb 19, 2015 at 14:28
3

Swift 5

let myInt = NumberFormatter().number(from: "42")
2

I do use extension in swift 3/4 and it's cool.

extension String {
    var numberValue: NSNumber? {
        if let value = Int(self) {
            return NSNumber(value: value)
        }
        return nil
    }
}

and then just use following code:

stringVariable.numberValue

What is cool is that you don't need a chain of if statements to unwrap the optional values. For instance,

if let _ = stringVariable, let intValue = Int(stringVariable!) {
    doSomething(NSNumber.init(value: intValue))
}

can be replaced by:

doSomething(stringVariable?.numberValue)
-1

("23" as NSString).integerValue ("23.5" as NSString).doubleValue

and so on .

-5

Try Once

let myString = "123"
let myInt = NSNumber(value: Int(myString) ?? 0)
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.