18

The documentation for Elm's Random module states:

A good way to get an unexpected seed is to use the current time. http://package.elm-lang.org/packages/elm-lang/core/1.1.0/Random

I don't see however a good example of how to perform such initialization logic in FRP application. What signal should I react to? How to do this with a minimum of code and maximum of clarity.

27

There are different ways to do this. Each has it's own benefits. I'll give you the three that I know with a similar example for each.

1) Add a time ticker input

One thing you could do is add time to the inputs of your program. An example of a tiny program using the current time every second for a random number:

import Time
import Time (Time, second)
import Text (asText)
import Mouse
import Signal
import Signal (Signal, (<~), (~))
import Random
import Random (Seed)
import Graphics.Element (Element)

randomInt : Seed -> Int
randomInt seed = seed |> (Random.generate <| Random.int 1 10) |> fst

otherInput : Signal (Int,Int)
otherInput = Mouse.position

timeSeed : Signal Seed
timeSeed = Random.initialSeed << round <~ Time.every second

inputs : Signal (Seed,(Int,Int))
inputs = (,) <~ timeSeed ~ otherInput

update : (Seed, (Int,Int)) -> (Int,Int) -> (Int,Int)
update (seed,(x,y)) (x',y') =
  let num = randomInt seed
  in (x-x'-num,y'-y+num) -- this update function is nonsense

main : Signal Element
main = asText <~ Signal.foldp update (0,0) inputs

If you need time as an input anyway, and sample your other inputs based on this time, it's the easiest way. (If you already use Time.fps for this, use Time.timestamp to get the actual time with it)

2) At startup with a signal

If you don't normally need time as an input to your program, the previous solution is not ideal. You may prefer to initialise your program state with the start time of the program and not have to ignore a time ticker for the rest of the time the program runs.

It's probably easiest to do this with the signal-extra package*. Use Signal.Time.startTime to get a signal that doesn't tick but only has the start time of the program as the initial value. Use Signal.Extra.foldp' so you can use the initial value of your inputs.

import Time
import Time (Time, second)
import Text (asText)
import Mouse
import Signal
import Signal (Signal, (<~), (~))
import Random
import Random (Seed)
import Graphics.Element (Element)
import Signal.Extra as SignalE
import Signal.Time as Time

randomInt : Seed -> (Int,Seed)
randomInt seed = (Random.generate <| Random.int 1 10) |> fst

otherInput : Signal (Int,Int)
otherInput = Mouse.position

startTimeSeed : Signal Seed
startTimeSeed = Random.initialSeed << round <~ Time.startTime

inputs : Signal (Seed,(Int,Int))
inputs = (,) <~ startTimeSeed ~ otherInput

update (x,y) (seed,(x',y')) =
  let (num,seed') = randomInt seed
  in (seed',(x-x'-num,y'-y+num))

main : Signal Element
main = asText <~ SignalE.foldp' (snd >> update) identity inputs

*I may be biased because I'm the author of the linked package. But I don't know of other packages offering the same functionality.

3) At startup with a port

If you find the previous solution unsatisfactory, because you have this not-changing Signal to add to your input, this solution is for you. Here we use JavaScript interop to get the program startup time, and Elm will accept it as a constant value (no Signal). The Elm code looks like so:

import Time
import Time (Time, second)
import Text (asText)
import Mouse
import Signal (Signal, (<~))
import Random
import Random (Seed)
import Graphics.Element (Element)

port startTime : Float

randomInt : Seed -> (Int,Seed)
randomInt seed = (Random.generate <| Random.int 1 10) |> fst

startTimeSeed : Seed
startTimeSeed = Random.initialSeed <| round startTime

update (x,y) (seed,(x',y')) =
  let (num,seed') = randomInt seed
  in (seed',(x-x'-num,y'-y+num))

main : Signal Element
main = asText <~ Signal.foldp update (startTimeSeed, (0,0)) Mouse.position

So what's the downside here? You need to write some JavaScript. Instead of the standard

<script>Elm.fullscreen(Elm.<YourModule>)</script>

, you need something like this in your html file:

<script>Elm.fullscreen(Elm.<YourModule>, {startTime: Date.now()})</script>

If you choose this way, perhaps it's a good idea to use a random number from JavaScript as your initial seed. I've read that that's more cryptographically secure (disclaimer: I don't know much about crypto). So you'd have a port aRandomNumber : Int and {aRandomNumber: Math.floor((Math.random() - 0.5) * 4294967295)}.

5

I reworked the third example from @Apanatshka above, trying to get to simpler code that feels more like the standard architecture, at least as seen in Mike Clark's training videos, and runs under Elm 0.16. Here is the refactored version I came up with:

module PortBasedRandom where

import Mouse
import Signal exposing (Signal, map)
import Random exposing (Seed)
import Graphics.Element exposing (Element, show)

port primer : Float


firstSeed : Seed
firstSeed =
  Random.initialSeed <| round primer


type alias Model =
  { nextSeed : Seed
  , currentInt : Int
  }


initialModel : Model
initialModel =
  { nextSeed = firstSeed
  , currentInt = 0
  }


randomInt : Model -> Model
randomInt model =
  let
      (i, s) = Random.generate (Random.int 1 10) model.nextSeed
  in
      { model | nextSeed = s, currentInt = i }


update : (Int, Int) -> Model -> Model
update (_, _) model =
  randomInt model


main : Signal Element
main =
  Signal.foldp update initialModel Mouse.position
    |> map (\m -> show m.currentInt)

This needs special help in the HTML file, so here's a file containing two examples:

<html>
  <head>
    <title></title>
    <script src="port_based_random.js"></script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <p>Move your mouse to generate new random numbers between 1 and 10 inclusive.</p>
    <script>Elm.fullscreen(Elm.PortBasedRandom, {primer: Date.now()})</script>
    <script>Elm.fullscreen(Elm.PortBasedRandom, {primer: Math.floor((Math.random() - 0.5) * 4294967295)})</script>
  </body>
</html>
1

If you are using the StartApp then you'll need to use a custom HTML file with

<script type="text/javascript">
    var yourPgm = Elm.fullscreen(Elm.Main, {startTime: Date.now()});
</script>

Then to use the startTime as a seed:

startTimeSeed : Seed
startTimeSeed = Random.initialSeed <| round startTime

app =
  StartApp.start
    { init = (init startTimeSeed, Effects.none)
    , update = update
    , view = view
    , inputs = []
    }

And then in the code you'll be doing something like

init : Seed -> List Int
init seed = fst <| Random.generate intList seed

where, for example:

intList : Random.Generator (List Int)
intList =
    Random.list 5 (Random.int 0 100)
1

Just an update for people who got here from Google like I did: the recommended way to do this now is with flags instead of ports. The code in the other answers will not even compile now.

https://guide.elm-lang.org/interop/javascript.html

HTML

<script>
  var app = Elm.Main.fullscreen({myRandomValue: Date.now()});
</script>

Elm

type alias Model = {
  mySeed : String
}

type alias Flags = {
  myRandomValue : String
}

init : Flags -> ( Model, Cmd Msg )
init flags =
  {
    mySeed = flags.myRandomValue
  }

...

main : Program Flags Model Msg
main = programWithFlags
  {
    view = view,
    init = init,
    update = update
  }
  • Still very low-quality answer. You should add some examples directly in code. – timiTao Feb 2 '18 at 8:10
  • @timiTao Thanks for the feedback - I added some example code to my answer. – Tyler Yasaka Feb 3 '18 at 4:24

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