7

I have a matrix (1000 x 2830) like this:

        9178    3574    3547
160     B_B     B_B      A_A
301     B_B     A_B      A_B
303     B_B     B_B      A_A
311     A_B     A_B      A_A
312     B_B     A_B      A_A
314     B_B     A_B      A_A

and I want to obtain the following (duplicating colnames and splitting each element of each column):

      9178   9178   3574   3574   3547   3547
160     B      B      B      B      A      A
301     B      B      A      B      A      B
303     B      B      B      B      A      A
311     A      B      A      B      A      A
312     B      B      A      B      A      A
314     B      B      A      B      A      A

I tried using strsplit but I got error messages because this is a matrix, not a string. Could you please provide some ideas for resolving this?

  • None of it looks like a matrix at the moment. Could you try formatting it a little differently? – LauriK Feb 19 '15 at 13:21
  • 1
    Consider using a prefix or suffix on the column names like 9178_1 and 9178_2 to avoid duplicated column names (which makes it much more difficult to select the right columns later) – docendo discimus Feb 19 '15 at 13:30
7

Here's an option using dplyr (for bind_cols) and tidyr (for separate_) together with lapply from base R. It assumes that your data is a data.frame (i.e. you might need to convert it to data.frame first):

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

lapply(names(df), function(x) separate_(df[x], x, paste0(x,"_",1:2), sep = "_" )) %>% 
  bind_cols
#  X9178_1 X9178_2 X3574_1 X3574_2 X3547_1 X3547_2
#1       B       B       B       B       A       A
#2       B       B       A       B       A       B
#3       B       B       B       B       A       A
#4       A       B       A       B       A       A
#5       B       B       A       B       A       A
#6       B       B       A       B       A       A
  • 1
    Thank you so much, this option works perfectly!!!!! – July Feb 19 '15 at 14:52
  • Seems to miss out on the rownames though--need a slight modification. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 19 '15 at 14:53
  • 1
    @July, are you interested in the original row names? Do they carry any information you require? – docendo discimus Feb 19 '15 at 15:07
  • Yes, rownames are important but I recovered them from matrix used as input for lapply function. Thanks for your interest – July Feb 19 '15 at 15:13
  • If you need the row names, you can just add the following to the existing code: ... %>% mutate(row = rownames(df)) – docendo discimus Feb 19 '15 at 15:46
6

I'm biased, but I would recommend using cSplit from my "splitstackshape" package. Since it appears that you have rownames in your input, use as.data.table(., keep.rownames = TRUE):

library(splitstackshape)
cSplit(as.data.table(mydf, keep.rownames = TRUE), names(mydf), "_")
#     rn X9178_1 X9178_2 X3574_1 X3574_2 X3547_1 X3547_2
# 1: 160       B       B       B       B       A       A
# 2: 301       B       B       A       B       A       B
# 3: 303       B       B       B       B       A       A
# 4: 311       A       B       A       B       A       A
# 5: 312       B       B       A       B       A       A
# 6: 314       B       B       A       B       A       A

Less legible than cSplit (but presently likely to be faster) would be to use stri_split_fixed from "stringi", like this:

library(stringi)
`dimnames<-`(do.call(cbind, 
                     lapply(mydf, stri_split_fixed, "_", simplify = TRUE)), 
             list(rownames(mydf), rep(colnames(mydf), each = 2)))
#     X9178 X9178 X3574 X3574 X3547 X3547
# 160 "B"   "B"   "B"   "B"   "A"   "A"  
# 301 "B"   "B"   "A"   "B"   "A"   "B"  
# 303 "B"   "B"   "B"   "B"   "A"   "A"  
# 311 "A"   "B"   "A"   "B"   "A"   "A"  
# 312 "B"   "B"   "A"   "B"   "A"   "A"  
# 314 "B"   "B"   "A"   "B"   "A"   "A" 

If speed is of the essence, I would suggest checking out the "iotools" package, particularly the mstrsplit function. The approach would be similar to the "stringi" approach:

library(iotools)
`dimnames<-`(do.call(cbind, 
                lapply(mydf, mstrsplit, "_", ncol = 2, type = "character")),
             list(rownames(mydf), rep(colnames(mydf), each = 2)))

You may need to add an lapply(mydf, as character) in there if you forgot to use stringsAsFactors = FALSE when converting from a matrix to a data.frame, but it should still beat even the stri_split approach.

  • 1
    The second solution is remarkably fast (see the benchmark below) – Marat Talipov Feb 19 '15 at 16:20
4

Something you can do, although it seems a bit "twisted" (yourmat being your matrix)...:

inter<-data.frame(t(sapply(as.vector(yourmat), function(x) {
                                                 strsplit(x, "_")[[1]]
                                             })),
                   row.names=paste0(rep(colnames(yourmat), e=nrow(yourmat)), 1:nrow(yourmat)),
                   stringsAsFactors=F)
res<-do.call("cbind", 
              split(inter, factor(substr(row.names(inter), 1, 4), level = colnames(yourmat))))
res
#       9178.X1 9178.X2 3574.X1 3574.X2 3547.X1 3547.X2
# 91781       B       B       B       B       A       A
# 91782       B       B       A       B       A       B
# 91783       B       B       B       B       A       A
# 91784       A       B       A       B       A       A
# 91785       B       B       A       B       A       A
# 91786       B       B       A       B       A       A

Edit
If you want the row.names of resto be the same as in yourmat, you can do:

row.names(res)<-row.names(yourmat)

NB: If yourmat is a data.frame instead of a matrix the as.vector function in the first line needs to be changed to unlist.

  • 1
    Thanks a lot, I also tried this option and, although is a bit more complicated than docendo answer, it worked. Thanks again! – July Feb 19 '15 at 14:54
  • I don't understand why you've moved the colnames to rownames here.... – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 19 '15 at 14:56
  • @AnandaMahto, you mean for the inter data.frame ? it's so I can later split the data.frame according to former columns (as it is a matrix, I loose the names when using as.vector) – Cath Feb 19 '15 at 14:59
  • @CathG, No. I mean in your results. Where did "91781", "91782" and so on come from when the original rownames were "160", "301" and so on. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 19 '15 at 15:01
  • @AnandaMahto, there are coming from the call to cbind and correspond to the row.names of the first element of the list I get from the call to split. And to be honest, I wouldn't have guessed what the row.names would be. But I can change them afterwards to keep the former names – Cath Feb 19 '15 at 15:03
2

base R solution without using data frames:

# split
z <- unlist(strsplit(m,'_'))
M <- matrix(c(z[c(T,F)],z[c(F,T)]),nrow=nrow(m))

# properly order columns
i <- 1:ncol(M)
M <- M[,order(c(i[c(T,F)],i[c(F,T)]))]

# set dimnames
rownames(M) <- rownames(m)
colnames(M) <- rep(colnames(m),each=2)

#    9178  9178  3574  3574  3547  3547
# 160 "B"   "B"   "A"   "B"   "B"   "A"  
# 301 "B"   "A"   "A"   "B"   "B"   "B"  
# 303 "B"   "B"   "A"   "B"   "B"   "A"  
# 311 "A"   "A"   "A"   "B"   "B"   "A"  
# 312 "B"   "A"   "A"   "B"   "B"   "A"  
# 314 "B"   "A"   "A"   "B"   "B"   "A"  

[Update] Here is a small benchmarking study of the proposed solutions (I didn't include the cSplit solution because it was too slow):

Setup:

m <- matrix('A_B',nrow=1000,ncol=2830)
d <- as.data.frame(m, stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

##### 
f.mtrx <- function(m) {
  z <- unlist(strsplit(m,'_'))
  M <- matrix(c(z[c(T,F)],z[c(F,T)]),nrow=nrow(m))

  # properly order columns
  i <- 1:ncol(M)
  M <- M[,order(c(i[c(T,F)],i[c(F,T)]))]

  # set dimnames
  rownames(M) <- rownames(m)
  colnames(M) <- rep(colnames(m),each=2)
  M
}

library(stringi)
f.mtrx2 <- function(m) {
  z <- unlist(stri_split_fixed(m,'_'))
  M <- matrix(c(z[c(T,F)],z[c(F,T)]),nrow=nrow(m))

  # properly order columns
  i <- 1:ncol(M)
  M <- M[,order(c(i[c(T,F)],i[c(F,T)]))]

  # set dimnames
  rownames(M) <- rownames(m)
  colnames(M) <- rep(colnames(m),each=2)
  M
}

#####
library(splitstackshape)
f.cSplit <- function(mydf) cSplit(as.data.table(mydf, keep.rownames = TRUE), names(mydf), "_")

#####
library(stringi)
f.stringi <- function(mydf) `dimnames<-`(do.call(cbind, 
                     lapply(mydf, stri_split_fixed, "_", simplify = TRUE)), 
             list(rownames(mydf), rep(colnames(mydf), each = 2)))

#####
library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

f.dplyr <- function(df) lapply(names(df), function(x) separate_(df[x], x, paste0(x,"_",1:2), sep = "_" )) %>% 
  bind_cols

#####
library(iotools)
f.mstrsplit <- function(mydf) `dimnames<-`(do.call(cbind, 
                     lapply(mydf, mstrsplit, "_", ncol = 2, type = "character")),
             list(rownames(mydf), rep(colnames(mydf), each = 2)))



#####
library(rbenchmark)

benchmark(f.mtrx(m), f.mtrx2(m), f.dplyr(d), f.stringi(d), f.mstrsplit(d), replications = 10)

Results:

      test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
3     f.dplyr(d)           10  27.722   10.162    27.360    0.269          0         0
5 f.mstrsplit(d)           10   2.728    1.000     2.607    0.098          0         0
1      f.mtrx(m)           10  37.943   13.909    34.885    0.799          0         0
2     f.mtrx2(m)           10  15.176    5.563    13.936    0.802          0         0
4   f.stringi(d)           10   8.107    2.972     7.815    0.247          0         0

In the updated benchmark, the winner is f.mstrsplit.

  • It seems to me that the f.stringi is the fastest so it is not clear how the data.table method win here. – akrun Feb 19 '15 at 17:03
  • If you really want a winner, check out the update at the bottom of my answer. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 19 '15 at 17:25
  • @AnandaMahto, OP mentioned matrix of 1000x2830 size, so I guess performance is crucial here. Your latest solution, f.mstrsplit(), is a winner on large matrices. – Marat Talipov Feb 19 '15 at 17:44

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