56

I'm building an extranet for a company paranoid about security. They want to make sure that (among other things) their users are browsing the site with the Private Browsing mode switched on in their web browser so that no cookies or history is kept.

I found only this http://jeremiahgrossman.blogspot.com/2009/03/detecting-private-browsing-mode.html and https://serverfault.com/questions/18966/force-safari-to-operate-in-private-mode-and-detect-that-state-from-a-webserver

The ideal solution would use no or minimal javascript. Would attempting to set a unique cookie work for all browsers and platforms? Anyone done this before?

thanks!


update

http://crypto.stanford.edu/~collinj/research/incognito/ uses the CSS visited technique of the browser fingerprinters mentioned by other posters- thanks for the hints.

I like it because it is small and elegant, but still want to be able to do it without javascript if possible.

  • 4
    Lack of javascript support is not a good indication of use of Private Browsing. There are many reasons Javascript could have been disabled not the least of which is the use of NoScript. – Thomas May 18 '10 at 20:31
  • 3
    @Thomas - that isn't what he's saying. The links describe a method that requires Javascript to check the style of anchors to test whether private mode is on. – erickson May 18 '10 at 20:40
  • Are you looking to simply log this information or do you want something to happen as a result of the private-browser-detection? (if so, what?) – James May 18 '10 at 20:40
  • 1
    @erickson - In addition to trying to check for lack of Javascript, or Javascript being disabled, there is no script you could devise that would safely identify Private Browsing because of script sniffers and blockers such as NoScirpt and the fact that the method by which Private Browsing is implemented is different between browsers. – Thomas May 18 '10 at 21:01
  • @J-P: i want to make a message box appear after login that recommends private browsing be turned on (among other things) to help keep the site content secure. – Steve May 19 '10 at 21:28

16 Answers 16

41

Here's an easier way to do detect privacy mode. This works in Safari only. I created it because a web app I am developing uses localStorage. LocalStorage is not available in Safari when in privacy mode, thus my app will not work. On page load, run the script below. It shows an alert box if we cannot use localStorage.

try {
  // try to use localStorage
  localStorage.test = 2;        
} catch (e) {
  // there was an error so...
  alert('You are in Privacy Mode\nPlease deactivate Privacy Mode and then reload the page.');
}
  • @RasmusBidstrup selv tak – Jez D Aug 8 '14 at 8:03
  • Right for me.!! – Nevin Madhukar K Jul 23 '15 at 10:37
  • 1
    Not working in Chrome 47.0.2526.106 m – Paul Annekov Jan 5 '16 at 10:17
  • Maybe also add localStorage.test = null; so it doesn't pollute storage for other browsers? – ChrisWren Mar 7 '16 at 20:38
  • 2
    This was only possible due to a bug in Safari, which has been fixed as of iOS 11 – proxiblue Aug 8 '18 at 3:43
39

To anyone else coming across this question, please note as of 2014, there is no reliable or accurate way to detect if someone is browsing in an incognito/private/safe browsing mode through Javascript or CSS. Previous solutions that once worked like the CSS history hack have since been rendered unusable by all browser vendors.

There should never be a situation where needing to detect private browsing mode on a normal day-to-day website is ever needed. People are choosing to browsing anonymously and or not anonymously for their own reasons.

Browsers like Chrome and Firefox do not disable functionality like localStorage any more. They simply namespace it in a temporary location to prevent websites that use it from erroring out. Once you're finished browsing, the namespace is erased and nothing is saved. If you are testing for localStorage support regardless of mode, it will always return true for browsers that support it.

If it is required internally by a company, you should develop a browser plugin. Chrome and Firefox in particular expose internal API's which allow plugins to check if the user is in private browsing/incognito mode and action accordingly. It cannot be done outside of a plugin.

If the decision is being made by the company and it is important, a plugin that simply checks if you're in private/incognito mode and prevents you from browsing until turned on should be an easy feat for any developer who knows a little Javascript. You would then ask all company employees to install this plugin.

  • 34
    There should never be a situation where needing to detect private browsing mode not strictly true, there are issues with apple: stackoverflow.com/questions/21159301/… where it would be nice to notify the client it will not work in private mode. – Pogrindis May 12 '15 at 14:47
  • 1
    While Chrome and Firefox do support webstorage, the Safari and Android market share is significant enough that this should be a concern. – mattLummus Jul 1 '15 at 14:49
  • 2
    Oh, there are cases, believe me. WordPress for example stores if you are logged in in a cookie. Those get destroyed when you close the private mode tab or window. In one current case we have the problem that people keep ranting that they have to log in over and over again as the Safari private mode base window does not explain what happens to Cookies. They just think "history is not saved" and believe that this will help keeping their things private. – kaiser Aug 4 '15 at 15:42
  • 14
    "There should never be a situation where needing to detect private browsing mode on a normal day-to-day website is ever needed" - Actually, here is one. We are working on a site providing resources for violence against women. As part of that site, we want to educate users who are not browsing in private mode about the fact they need to use private mode to ensure that the site visit is not in their history. I wanted to detect if users are not in private mode and if that's the case provide appropriate instructions on how to clear recent cache and return in private mode. – Professor Falken Jan 25 '16 at 23:06
  • 2
    We've had multiple users not realize they were in private browsing mode and thought that there was an issue with our site. I completely disagree with your assumption that there is never a need to detect this. – Graham Sep 11 '17 at 4:33
16

It is possible to detect enabled private browsing modes for the majority of used browsers. This includes Safari, Firefox, IE10, Edge and Google Chrome.


Firefox

When the private browsing mode of Firefox is enabled, the IndexedDB throws an InvalidStateError because it is not available in private browsing mode.

To very if that:

var db = indexedDB.open("test");
db.onerror = function(){/*Firefox PB enabled*/};
db.onsuccess =function(){/*Not enabled*/};

Safari

For Safari, the key is the local storage service. It is disabled in privacy mode. So try to access it and use a try-catch clause. The following method works on both, OSX and iOS devices. Credits for this method are going to this question and answer

var storage = window.sessionStorage;
try {
    storage.setItem("someKeyHere", "test");
    storage.removeItem("someKeyHere");
} catch (e) {
    if (e.code === DOMException.QUOTA_EXCEEDED_ERR && storage.length === 0) {
        //Private here
    }
}

IE10/Edge

Internet Explore is even going to disable the IndexedDB when in privacy mode. So check for existence. But that's not sufficient enough, because older browsers maybe don't even have an IDB. So do another check, e.g. for events that only IE10 and subsequent browser have/trigger. A related question on CodeReview can be found here

if(!window.indexedDB && (window.PointerEvent || window.MSPointerEvent)){
 //Privacy Mode
}

Chrome

Chromes Incognito mode can be verified by the file system. A great explanation can be found here on SO

var fs = window.RequestFileSystem || window.webkitRequestFileSystem;
if (!fs) {
    console.log("FS check failed..");
    return;
}

fs(window.TEMPORARY, 100, function (fs) {}, function (err) {
//Incognito mode
});
  • db.onerror is not a function - shouldn't it be db.onerror = function(){} – Steven Kaspar Aug 1 '17 at 12:32
  • 1
    @StevenKaspar Fixed, thx! – manniL Aug 1 '17 at 20:35
  • Safari didn't work for me anymore (11.1.2) but the referenced SO question got a new answer, which works for me: stackoverflow.com/a/47642304/333864 – Riesling Aug 28 '18 at 11:50
15

Here is my take on detecting private mode

function detectPrivateMode(cb) {
    var db,
    on = cb.bind(null, true),
    off = cb.bind(null, false)

    function tryls() {
        try {
            localStorage.length ? off() : (localStorage.x = 1, localStorage.removeItem("x"), off());
        } catch (e) {
            // Safari only enables cookie in private mode
            // if cookie is disabled then all client side storage is disabled
            // if all client side storage is disabled, then there is no point
            // in using private mode
            navigator.cookieEnabled ? on() : off();
        }
    }

    // Blink (chrome & opera)
    window.webkitRequestFileSystem ? webkitRequestFileSystem(0, 0, off, on)
    // FF
    : "MozAppearance" in document.documentElement.style ? (db = indexedDB.open("test"), db.onerror = on, db.onsuccess = off)
    // Safari
    : /constructor/i.test(window.HTMLElement) || window.safari ? tryls()
    // IE10+ & edge
    : !window.indexedDB && (window.PointerEvent || window.MSPointerEvent) ? on()
    // Rest
    : off()
}

detectPrivateMode(function (isPrivateMode) {
    console.log('is private mode: ' + isPrivateMode)
})

edit found a modern, faster, synkronas way to try it in firefox (they don't have service workers in privat mode) similar to ie don't include indexedDB but the test only works in secure sites

: "MozAppearance" in document.documentElement.style ? navigator.serviceWorker ? off() : on()
14

There's no way for your web page to know, absolutely for sure, that the user is in private browsing mode. Any attempts to check for various browser features will need to change often as security implementations are updated. It may work for some time in some browsers, but not all.

If the company is that concerned about security, I'd suggest rolling your own Firefox or Chromium distribution with locked down privacy settings, and only allowing that custom client to connect to the extranet.

  • 2
    What supporting evidence? The "fingerprint" that doesn't tell you if private browsing is on? The company is "paranoid about security", so relying on so-called fingerprints isn't sufficient. – Matt S May 18 '10 at 23:18
  • hmmm... my own cross platform FF distribution? Thats a bit much effort... Are you aware of an 80% solution? (eg 80% of the time we can guess if the user is in private browsing mode). I'm looking to combine a number of security recommendations to the visitor: using private browsing is one of them. As others have suggested, not all visitors will be willing to do that, and maybe 1/4 of them will be in "safe" locations and will not need to. – Steve May 19 '10 at 21:25
  • 1
    A recommendation need not know if the user is implementing the suggestion. – Lee Louviere Oct 25 '11 at 16:21
  • -1 The OP said this is not a solution "10% of my users will be logging in via very flaky 24k dial up lines and only have electricity for a couple of hours a day if they are lucky" – Lee Louviere Oct 25 '11 at 18:17
4

The localStorage trick is a bug which has been fixed, and it doesn't work anymore in Safari 11.0.

There is an interesting alternative that works in Safari, Opera and Internet Explorer (not Chrome): those browser send a DNT: 1 header (Do Not Track).

It's not 100% reliable because this header can be enabled for normal browsing (it's disabled by default), but it can help to identify privacy-conscious users.

  • DNT is broken in the latest beta version of Safari 11. It's not longer exposed to JavaScript, only via the HTTP header. – Etienne Martin Aug 8 '17 at 19:11
3

You're not going to block them if they don't have private browsing enabled.

Why have a smart message box at all?

Would attempting to set a unique cookie work for all browsers and platforms? Anyone done this before?

I think the most elegant solution would be to:

  • Perform a security leak test
  • If security leak test reveals issue
    • Tell user to check settings
    • Suggest privacy mode

Because as you said, not everyone can or needs to enable privacy mode.

  • how would you do a security leak test? – Steve Oct 25 '11 at 23:07
  • Attempt to do things that you're trying to secure against. If you don't want cookies, attempt to make one. – Lee Louviere Oct 27 '11 at 13:45
2

Web browsers behave differently when privacy mode is activated.

On many browsers the caching of resources is limited. It is possible to detect where a browser has been based on their CSS cache. Its possible to conduct this this attack without JavaScript.

The EFF is working on a project to fingerprint browsers. Parts of the browsers fingerprint will be different when privacy mode is activated. Go ahead, try it.

  • 1
    Thanks for the interesting links. I had a go but all it does is change the fingerprint. If I've done my job right I'll not be able to tell if a visitor has come before with a different fingerprint and therefore be able to detect private browsing? – Steve May 19 '10 at 21:36
  • @Steve Although I haven't done much digging, I suspect that there is a part of the fingerprint that is always abnormal when private browsing is enabled. But this is highly browser specific. – rook May 19 '10 at 21:41
  • 1
    Interesting read. The "try it" link is broken at the moment. :( – Mrchief Feb 1 '16 at 19:01
2

I agree with DigitalSeas's sentiment that we should generally not try to detect if the user is in a "private browsing" mode. However, I recently discovered that FireFox now subscribes to a service called "disconnect.me", which provides the url blacklist they use in their "tracking protection" feature. Since disconnect.me blacklists certain social networks (e.g. Facebook's facebook.net), we found that their SDKs would not load in FireFox. Therefore, it seems reasonable that we could try and detect private browsing mode in order to provide a more useful and precise error message to our users.

With that justification out of the way, this gist claims to provide detection for private browsing in major browsers using tricks specific to those browsers. At the time of this writing (the gist may have been updated by the time you read this) the detection logic is as follows:

function retry(isDone, next) {
    var current_trial = 0, max_retry = 50, interval = 10, is_timeout = false;
    var id = window.setInterval(
        function() {
            if (isDone()) {
                window.clearInterval(id);
                next(is_timeout);
            }
            if (current_trial++ > max_retry) {
                window.clearInterval(id);
                is_timeout = true;
                next(is_timeout);
            }
        },
        10
    );
}

function isIE10OrLater(user_agent) {
    var ua = user_agent.toLowerCase();
    if (ua.indexOf('msie') === 0 && ua.indexOf('trident') === 0) {
        return false;
    }
    var match = /(?:msie|rv:)\s?([\d\.]+)/.exec(ua);
    if (match && parseInt(match[1], 10) >= 10) {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

function detectPrivateMode(callback) {
    var is_private;

    if (window.webkitRequestFileSystem) {
        window.webkitRequestFileSystem(
            window.TEMPORARY, 1,
            function() {
                is_private = false;
            },
            function(e) {
                console.log(e);
                is_private = true;
            }
        );
    } else if (window.indexedDB && /Firefox/.test(window.navigator.userAgent)) {
        var db;
        try {
            db = window.indexedDB.open('test');
        } catch(e) {
            is_private = true;
        }

        if (typeof is_private === 'undefined') {
            retry(
                function isDone() {
                    return db.readyState === 'done' ? true : false;
                },
                function next(is_timeout) {
                    if (!is_timeout) {
                        is_private = db.result ? false : true;
                    }
                }
            );
        }
    } else if (isIE10OrLater(window.navigator.userAgent)) {
        is_private = false;
        try {
            if (!window.indexedDB) {
                is_private = true;
            }                 
        } catch (e) {
            is_private = true;
        }
    } else if (window.localStorage && /Safari/.test(window.navigator.userAgent)) {
        try {
            window.localStorage.setItem('test', 1);
        } catch(e) {
            is_private = true;
        }

        if (typeof is_private === 'undefined') {
            is_private = false;
            window.localStorage.removeItem('test');
        }
    }

    retry(
        function isDone() {
            return typeof is_private !== 'undefined' ? true : false;
        },
        function next(is_timeout) {
            callback(is_private);
        }
    );
}
1

Well, you wouldn't really distinguish private mode from "block all cookies" in that way, but apart from that rare situation I guess it should work.


The big problem IMO, is that this is a very very bad site design, not better than the good ol' "you need browser xxx to see this website" that was common in the '90s. Not all browser have a Private Browsing mode (as much as I despise IE, your cutting out IE7 users for instance) and those users won't be able to access your site at all.

Also, when I'm on the Internet I often have several tabs open with multiple website. It would be really annoying for me to have to switch to private mode just to see that website and not being able to access the other sites at the same time.

One thing you could do would be designing the site using sessions instead of cookies, so they won't be stored (as you don't use them...). And as for the history... really, what's the problem with that?

  • 2
    Or put the whole site behind a password protected, encrypted connection with caching aggressively disabled. – Marcel Korpel May 18 '10 at 22:30
  • @The Rook: nah: its pretty interesting. There are some bizarre technical challenges like requiring all users to go via https but knowing that some countries block ssl connections, or knowing that 10% of my users will be logging in via very flaky 24k dial up lines and only have electricity for a couple of hours a day if they are lucky... – Steve May 19 '10 at 21:21
  • @Marcel: yep, done all that. need to go further – Steve May 19 '10 at 21:29
0

I've solved this issue by using two HTML pages. The main page define a status variable and set a cookie. The second page is opened in a new window (not tab), read the cookie and set status to the cookie value. Under MSIE, the cookie value is passed to the child page when the main page in normal mode. When in InPrivate Browsing mode, the cookie value is not passed to the child page (but is passed if you open a new tab).

The main.html page:

<script>     
var myCookie="nocookie";
document.cookie="checkInPrivate=1";
var h=window.open("child.html", "_blank", "left=9999,height=200,width=200");
setTimeout(function() {
    var status=null;
    if (myCookie=="nocookie") {
        status="unable to determine if we are InPrivate Browsing mode (child page did not set the cookie)";
    } else if (myCookie.indexOf("checkInPrivate")>=0) {
        status="not in InPrivate Browsing mode (child page did set the cookie)";
    } else {
        status="in InPrivate Browsing mode (child page set the cookie value but it was not provided)";
    }
    alert(status);
}, 200);
</script>

The child.html page:

Detecting MSIE's InPrivate Browsing mode...
<script>
window.opener.myCookie=document.cookie;
window.close();
</script>

I'm using InPrivate Browsing mode in order to prevent Browser Helper Objects (BHO) and browser extensions to be enabled, since BHO are most often malwares which can modify the web pages even if HTTPS and strong authentication are used. Internet Explorer 9 has a "Disable toolbars and extensions when InPrivate Browsing starts" in its "Privacy" settings.

However, this is not the ultimate way to prevent malicious browser extension: a malicious extension may change the main page behavior to make it think that the myCookie value has not been set and. We would wrongly assume that we are in InPrivate Browsing mode.

Note that I need cookies for my application so I do not use InPrivate Browsing for that purpose.

0

Write code to achieve following

1) In firefox test browser version. This method works with version >= 33.0 ( supports service workers ). Cannot use this method with old ( < 33.0 ) versions.

2) Try to set service worker. 3) If you can set,use or access a service worker you are 1000% not in private browsing mode as service workers cannot be interacted with on Firefox private browsing mode. I wish that they could be.

Quote:

"In Firefox, Service Worker APIs are hidden and cannot be used when the user is in private browsing mode"

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Service_Worker_API/Using_Service_Workers

0

Not sure if its cause this question is old but Firefox does provide documentation on how to detect private browsing mode. However it involves using an import of theirs DXR PrivateBrowsingUtils:

try {
      // Firefox 20+
      Components.utils.import("resource://gre/modules/PrivateBrowsingUtils.jsm");
      if (!PrivateBrowsingUtils.isWindowPrivate(window)) {
        ...
      }
    } catch(e) {
      // pre Firefox 20 (if you do not have access to a doc. 
      // might use doc.hasAttribute("privatebrowsingmode") then instead)
      try {
        var inPrivateBrowsing = Components.classes["@mozilla.org/privatebrowsing;1"].
                                getService(Components.interfaces.nsIPrivateBrowsingService).
                                privateBrowsingEnabled;
        if (!inPrivateBrowsing) {
          ...
        }
      } catch(e) {
        Components.utils.reportError(e);
        return;
      }
    }
  • 2
    This is deprecated and not working in current version of firefox @Endless Answer seems the one working for me in latest Firefox and Chrome versions – Mahmoud Mostafa Apr 24 '17 at 11:51
0

While creating my Safari extension, I found out that it was possible to query the boolean safari.self.browserWindow.activeTab.private. Below worked for me to check whether the browser was open in Private or not but only from the extension.

isPrivate = false;
try {
isPrivate = safari.self.browserWindow.activeTab.private;
} catch (_) {
isPrivate = true;
}
if (isPrivate === true){
console.log("Private window.");}
else {
console.log("Not private window.");}

Source: developer.apple.com | Instance Property private

0
function isPrivate(callback) {
  callback || (callback = function(){});
  var fs = window.RequestFileSystem || window.webkitRequestFileSystem;

  if(fs){
    return fs(window.TEMPORARY, 1, callback.bind(this, false), callback.bind(this, true));
  }

  if(window.indexedDB && /Firefox/.test(window.navigator.userAgent)){
    try {
      var db       = window.indexedDB.open('test');
      var tryes    = 0;
      var interval = limit = 10;

      var wait = function(check){
        if(tryes >= limit){ return callback(true); } // Give up
        return window.setTimeout(check, ++tryes * interval);
      }

      var evaluate = function(){
        return db.readyState === 'done' ? callback(!db.result) : wait(evaluate);
      }

      return wait(evaluate);
    } catch (e) {
      return callback(true);
    }
  }

  if (!!window.navigator.userAgent.match(/(MSIE|Trident|Edge)/)){
    try {
      return callback(!window.indexedDB);
    } catch (e) {
      return callback(true);
    }
  }

  try {
    window.openDatabase(null, null, null, null);
    return callback(false);
  } catch (e) {
    return callback(true);
  }
}

isPrivate( function(isPrivate) {
  console.log('Private mode ===>', isPrivate);
});
-1

I have built a little library that will work on all major platforms and browsers that I have tested: https://github.com/jLynx/PrivateWindowCheck

You can simply call

isPrivateWindow(function(is_private) {
    if(is_private)
        alert('Private');
    else
        alert('Not Private');
});

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