181

How do I remove all attributes which are undefined or null in a JavaScript object?

(Question is similar to this one for Arrays)

29 Answers 29

135

You can loop through the object:

var test = {
    test1 : null,
    test2 : 'somestring',
    test3 : 3,
}

function clean(obj) {
  for (var propName in obj) { 
    if (obj[propName] === null || obj[propName] === undefined) {
      delete obj[propName];
    }
  }
}

clean(test);

If you're concerned about this property removal not running up object's proptype chain, you can also:

function clean(obj) {
  var propNames = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj);
  for (var i = 0; i < propNames.length; i++) {
    var propName = propNames[i];
    if (obj[propName] === null || obj[propName] === undefined) {
      delete obj[propName];
    }
  }
}

A few notes on null vs undefined:

test.test1 === null; // true
test.test1 == null; // true

test.notaprop === null; // false
test.notaprop == null; // true

test.notaprop === undefined; // true
test.notaprop == undefined; // true
  • 2
    Added a quick correction. Undeclared "i" variable would leak into outer scope if this snippet were ever used in a function. – Eric Nguyen Dec 16 '13 at 6:11
  • 4
    you can simplify the (test[i]===null || test[i]===undefined) to (test[i]==null) – jaf0 May 24 '15 at 3:01
  • Hi, @EricNguyen, unlike C and other several languages, javascript does not have block scope for variables (only function scope), thus, the variable i will always leak into the scope after the for block. – Gerardo Lima May 10 '16 at 9:54
  • 1
    @GerardoLima, yes. I was kind of assuming that this would be all wrapped in a function. What I meant (assuming this is all wrapped with a function) is that you need the var declaration or i will leak even outside of the function scope. – Eric Nguyen May 14 '16 at 2:32
  • This will also loop through the primitive object's prototype - which in most cases is not desired. stackoverflow.com/a/2869372/1612318 – Rotareti Aug 7 '16 at 22:26
324

Using some ES6 / ES2015:

1) A simple one-liner to remove the items inline without assignment:

Object.keys(myObj).forEach((key) => (myObj[key] == null) && delete myObj[key]);

jsbin

2) This example was removed...

3) First example written as a function:

const removeEmpty = obj => {
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(key => obj[key] == null && delete obj[key]);
};

jsbin

4) This function uses recursion to delete items from nested objects as well:

const removeEmpty = obj => {
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(key => {
    if (obj[key] && typeof obj[key] === "object") removeEmpty(obj[key]); // recurse
    else if (obj[key] == null) delete obj[key]; // delete
  });
};

jsbin

4b) This is similar to 4), but instead of mutating the source object directly, it returns a new object.

const removeEmpty = obj => {
  const newObj = {};

  Object.keys(obj).forEach(key => {
    if (obj[key] && typeof obj[key] === "object") {
      newObj[key] = removeEmpty(obj[key]); // recurse
    } else if (obj[key] != null) {
      newObj[key] = obj[key]; // copy value
    }
  });

  return newObj;
};

5) A functional approach to 4b) based on @MichaelJ.Zoidl's answer using filter() and reduce(). This one returns a new object as well:

const removeEmpty = obj =>
  Object.keys(obj)
    .filter(k => obj[k] != null) // Remove undef. and null.
    .reduce(
      (newObj, k) =>
        typeof obj[k] === "object"
          ? { ...newObj, [k]: removeEmpty(obj[k]) } // Recurse.
          : { ...newObj, [k]: obj[k] }, // Copy value.
      {}
    );

jsbin

6) Same as 4) but with ES7 / 2016 Object.entries().

const removeEmpty = (obj) => 
  Object.entries(obj).forEach(([key, val]) => {
    if (val && typeof val === 'object') removeEmpty(val)
    else if (val == null) delete obj[key]
})

5b) Another functional version that uses recursion and returns a new object with ES2019 Object.fromEntries():

const removeEmpty = obj =>
  Object.fromEntries(
    Object.entries(obj)
      .filter(([k, v]) => v != null)
      .map(([k, v]) => (typeof v === "object" ? [k, removeEmpty(v)] : [k, v]))
  );

7) Same as 4) but in plain ES5:

function removeEmpty(obj) {
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key) {
    if (obj[key] && typeof obj[key] === 'object') removeEmpty(obj[key])
    else if (obj[key] == null) delete obj[key]
  });
};

jsbin

  • Regarding #5, do you imply functional => unreadable? Why using o and k where in every other example you are using object and key? – Augustin Riedinger Dec 13 '16 at 15:14
  • 3
    @AugustinRiedinger When I have to decide between a line-break and an abbreviation I sometimes go for the abbreviation if I think the abbreviation is the lesser evil. The code in 5) is not difficult to reason about and it's a function which removes empty keys from an object, so o and k are obvious. But I guess it's a matter of taste. – Rotareti Dec 13 '16 at 17:10
  • 2
    First version with a ES5 flavor: Object.keys(myObj).forEach(function (key) {(myObj[key] == null) && delete myObj[key]}); – TranslucentCloud Mar 1 '17 at 10:14
  • 1
    One line, without function: Object.entries(myObj).reduce((acc, [key, val]) => { if (val) acc[key] = val; return acc; }, {}) – Paul Slm May 10 '17 at 17:20
  • 5
    Since we are trying to be thorough, it might be nice to see an immutable solution. These are mutating the source object and are deceivingly returning the object which is actually unnecessary because the object has been mutated. Beginners will capture the returned object value and wonder why their source object is modified too. – Mike McLin Jan 29 '18 at 21:58
76

If you are using lodash or underscore.js, here is a simple solution:

var obj = {name: 'John', age: null};

var compacted = _.pickBy(obj);

This will only work with lodash 4, pre lodash 4 or underscore.js, use _.pick(obj, _.identity);

  • 1
    Brilliant! Thank you! FYI, what was not obvious to me is that you could use it also like this: foo().then(_.pickBy); // filtering out empty results – Maciej Gurban Aug 2 '16 at 20:36
  • 17
    Note that this will not have the desired result if the object contains falsy values such as 0 or empty strings. Then _.omit(obj, _.isUndefined) is better. – JHH May 23 '17 at 11:49
  • 2
    @JHH Your code doesn't work for false value. – technophyle Oct 30 '17 at 17:16
34

If somebody needs a recursive version of Owen's (and Eric's) answer, here it is:

/**
 * Delete all null (or undefined) properties from an object.
 * Set 'recurse' to true if you also want to delete properties in nested objects.
 */
function delete_null_properties(test, recurse) {
    for (var i in test) {
        if (test[i] === null) {
            delete test[i];
        } else if (recurse && typeof test[i] === 'object') {
            delete_null_properties(test[i], recurse);
        }
    }
}
  • This is great, works perfectly for a deep object! – Suman Apr 1 '16 at 19:48
  • After the for loop begins, you should check that the object hasOwnProperty using if(test.hasOwnProperty(i)) { ... } – Augie Gardner Oct 19 '16 at 6:01
  • @AugieGardner I'm curious why you'd like to check this - please explain it if you like. (Wouldn't it prevent the checking of inherited properties?) – Wumms Oct 19 '16 at 17:32
15

JSON.stringify removes the undefined keys.

removeUndefined = function(json){
  return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(json))
}
13

You are probably looking for the delete keyword.

var obj = { };
obj.theProperty = 1;
delete obj.theProperty;
  • 4
    This is what he is doing above, this also still leaves undefined in the object. – Josh Bedo Jul 24 '14 at 15:54
8

You can use a combination of JSON.stringify, its replacer parameter, and JSON.parse to turn it back into an object. Using this method also means the replacement is done to all nested keys within nested objects.

Example Object

var exampleObject = {
  string: 'value',
  emptyString: '',
  integer: 0,
  nullValue: null,
  array: [1, 2, 3],
  object: {
    string: 'value',
    emptyString: '',
    integer: 0,
    nullValue: null,
    array: [1, 2, 3]
  },
  arrayOfObjects: [
    {
      string: 'value',
      emptyString: '',
      integer: 0,
      nullValue: null,
      array: [1, 2, 3]
    },
    {
      string: 'value',
      emptyString: '',
      integer: 0,
      nullValue: null,
      array: [1, 2, 3]
    }
  ]
};

Replacer Function

function replaceUndefinedOrNull(key, value) {
  if (value === null || value === undefined) {
    return undefined;
  }

  return value;
}

Clean the Object

exampleObject = JSON.stringify(exampleObject, replaceUndefinedOrNull);
exampleObject = JSON.parse(exampleObject);

CodePen example

6

Simplest possible Lodash solution to return an object with the null and undefined values filtered out.

_.omitBy(obj, _.isNil)

  • this is the cleanest solution so far! – Jee Mok Oct 23 '18 at 4:06
5

Shorter ES6 pure solution, convert it to an array, use the filter function and convert it back to an object. Would also be easy to make a function...

Btw. with this .length > 0 i check if there is an empty string / array, so it will remove empty keys.

const MY_OBJECT = { f: 'te', a: [] }

Object.keys(MY_OBJECT)
 .filter(f => !!MY_OBJECT[f] && MY_OBJECT[f].length > 0)
 .reduce((r, i) => { r[i] = MY_OBJECT[i]; return r; }, {});

JS BIN https://jsbin.com/kugoyinora/edit?js,console

  • 1
    Nice functional solution – Puiu May 15 '17 at 16:06
  • I like this! But I think to remove all null and undefined it would be simpler to just use MY_OBJECT[f] != null. Your current solution removes everything but non empty strings/lists and throws an error when values are null – Rotareti Jun 13 '17 at 0:53
  • Right, you could also use/chain multiple filter's, would be more readable. – Michael J. Zoidl Jun 13 '17 at 6:27
  • If you generalise this slightly I think you get close to what loadash's omit does, you do need to check obj exists before calling Object.keys: const omit = (obj, filter) => obj && Object.keys(obj).filter(key => !filter(obj[key])).reduce((acc,key) => {acc[key] = obj[key]; return acc}, {}); – icc97 Oct 19 '18 at 6:07
  • Nice, but any integer value will be removed with this approach. – Ghis Dec 13 '18 at 15:18
5

Using ramda#pickBy you will remove all null, undefined and false values:

const obj = {a:1, b: undefined, c: null, d: 1}
R.pickBy(R.identity, obj)

As @manroe pointed out, to keep false values use isNil():

const obj = {a:1, b: undefined, c: null, d: 1, e: false}
R.pickBy(v => !R.isNil(v), obj)
  • 1
    (v) => !R.isNil(v) is probably a better choice for OP's question, given that false or other falsy values would also be rejected by R.identity – manroe May 8 '18 at 19:18
  • 1
    @manroe You're right! I've updated the answer. – Amio.io Feb 7 at 8:17
4

If you want 4 lines of a pure ES7 solution:

const clean = e => e instanceof Object ? Object.entries(e).reduce((o, [k, v]) => {
  if (typeof v === 'boolean' || v) o[k] = clean(v);
  return o;
}, e instanceof Array ? [] : {}) : e;

Or if you prefer more readable version:

function filterEmpty(obj, [key, val]) {
  if (typeof val === 'boolean' || val) {
    obj[key] = clean(val)
  };

  return obj;
}

function clean(entry) {
  if (entry instanceof Object) {
    const type = entry instanceof Array ? [] : {};
    const entries = Object.entries(entry);

    return entries.reduce(filterEmpty, type);
  }

  return entry;
}

This will preserve boolean values and it will clean arrays too. It also preserves the original object by returning a cleaned copy.

4

I have same scenario in my project and achieved using following method.

It works with all data types, few mentioned above doesn't work with date and empty arrays .

removeEmptyKeysFromObject.js

removeEmptyKeysFromObject(obj) {
   Object.keys(obj).forEach(key => {
  if (Object.prototype.toString.call(obj[key]) === '[object Date]' && (obj[key].toString().length === 0 || obj[key].toString() === 'Invalid Date')) {
    delete obj[key];
  } else if (obj[key] && typeof obj[key] === 'object') {
    this.removeEmptyKeysFromObject(obj[key]);
  } else if (obj[key] == null || obj[key] === '') {
    delete obj[key];
  }

  if (obj[key]
    && typeof obj[key] === 'object'
    && Object.keys(obj[key]).length === 0
    && Object.prototype.toString.call(obj[key]) !== '[object Date]') {
    delete obj[key];
  }
});
  return obj;
}

pass any object to this function removeEmptyKeysFromObject()

  • Your code snippet is broken, kindly fix that – WasiF Apr 24 at 11:11
3

If you don't want to mutate in place, but return a clone with the null/undefined removed, you could use the ES6 reduce function.

// Helper to remove undefined or null properties from an object
function removeEmpty(obj) {
  // Protect against null/undefined object passed in
  return Object.keys(obj || {}).reduce((x, k) => {
    // Check for null or undefined
    if (obj[k] != null) {
      x[k] = obj[k];
    }
    return x;
  }, {});
}
3

you can do shorter with ! condition

var r = {a: null, b: undefined, c:1};
for(var k in r)
   if(!r[k]) delete r[k];

Remember in usage : as @semicolor announce in comments: This would also delete properties if the value is an empty string, false or zero

  • 11
    This would also delete properties if the value is an empty string, false or zero. – Semicolon Mar 18 '14 at 21:35
  • 3
    Thiswas exactly what i was looking for to remove unwanted fields from a JSON request. Thanks! – Phrozen Oct 6 '14 at 0:51
  • Use [null, undefined].includes(r[k]) instead of !r[k]. – selmansamet Oct 13 '18 at 13:06
3

To piggypack on Ben's answer on how to solve this problem using lodash's _.pickBy, you can also solve this problem in the sister library: Underscore.js's _.pick.

var obj = {name: 'John', age: null};

var compacted = _.pick(obj, function(value) {
  return value !== null && value !== undefined;
});

See: JSFiddle Example

  • 1
    this returns empty array, also you changed the name of obj to object – Stephen DuMont Apr 20 '17 at 22:52
  • Thank you Stephen! How about now? I've updated my answer to include a JSFiddle link. – Alex Johnson Apr 21 '17 at 14:14
  • try using _.omit(obj, _.isEmpty); this is more conceptually pure and will include empty string. – Stephen DuMont Apr 24 '17 at 4:50
3

a reduce helper can do the trick (without type checking) -

const cleanObj = Object.entries(objToClean).reduce((acc, [key, value]) => {
      if (value) {
        acc[key] = value;
      }
      return acc;
    }, {});
3

For a deep search I used the following code, maybe it will be useful for anyone looking at this question (it is not usable for cyclic dependencies ) :

function removeEmptyValues(obj) {
        for (var propName in obj) {
            if (!obj[propName] || obj[propName].length === 0) {
                delete obj[propName];
            } else if (typeof obj[propName] === 'object') {
                removeEmptyValues(obj[propName]);
            }
        }
        return obj;
    }
3

Functional and immutable approach, without .filter and without creating more objects than needed

Object.keys(obj).reduce((acc, key) => (obj[key] === undefined ? acc : {...acc, [key]: obj[key]}), {})
2

If someone needs to remove undefined values from an object with deep search using lodash then here is the code that I'm using. It's quite simple to modify it to remove all empty values (null/undefined).

function omitUndefinedDeep(obj) {
  return _.reduce(obj, function(result, value, key) {
    if (_.isObject(value)) {
      result[key] = omitUndefinedDeep(value);
    }
    else if (!_.isUndefined(value)) {
      result[key] = value;
    }
    return result;
  }, {});
}
2

Instead of delete the property, you can also create a new object with the keys that are not null.

const removeEmpty = (obj) => {
  return Object.keys(obj).filter(key => obj[key]).reduce(
    (newObj, key) => {
      newObj[key] = obj[key]
      return newObj
    }, {}
  )
}
1

If you use eslint and want to avoid tripping the the no-param-reassign rule, you can use Object.assign in conjunction with .reduce and a computed property name for a fairly elegant ES6 solution:

const queryParams = { a: 'a', b: 'b', c: 'c', d: undefined, e: null, f: '', g: 0 };
const cleanParams = Object.keys(queryParams) 
  .filter(key => queryParams[key] != null)
  .reduce((acc, key) => Object.assign(acc, { [key]: queryParams[key] }), {});
// { a: 'a', b: 'b', c: 'c', f: '', g: 0 }
1

Here is a functional way to remove nulls from an Object using ES6 without mutating the object using only reduce:

const stripNulls = (obj) => {
  return Object.keys(obj).reduce((acc, current) => {
    if (obj[current] !== null) {
      return { ...acc, [current]: obj[current] }
    }
    return acc
  }, {})
}
  • Troll comment Two things regarding this being a functional pattern: within the stripNulls function it uses a reference from outside of the accumulator function's scope; and it also mixes the concerns by filtering within the accumulator function. 😝 (e.g. Object.entries(o).filter(([k,v]) => v !== null).reduce((o, [k, v]) => {o[k] = v; return o;}, {});) Yes, it will loop over the filtered items twice but the realized perf loss there is negligible. – Jason Cust Aug 3 '18 at 20:10
1

You can also use ...spread syntax using forEach something like this:

let obj = { a: 1, b: "b", c: undefined, d: null };
let cleanObj = {};

Object.keys(obj).forEach(val => {
  const newVal = obj[val];
  cleanObj = newVal ? { ...cleanObj, [val]: newVal } : cleanObj;
});

console.info(cleanObj);
1

Clean object in place

// General cleanObj function
const cleanObj = (valsToRemoveArr, obj) => {
   Object.keys(obj).forEach( (key) =>
      if (valsToRemoveArr.includes(obj[key])){
         delete obj[key]
      }
   })
}

cleanObj([undefined, null], obj)

Pure function

const getObjWithoutVals = (dontReturnValsArr, obj) => {
    const cleanObj = {}
    Object.entries(obj).forEach( ([key, val]) => {
        if(!dontReturnValsArr.includes(val)){
            cleanObj[key]= val
        } 
    })
    return cleanObj
}

//To get a new object without `null` or `undefined` run: 
const nonEmptyObj = getObjWithoutVals([undefined, null], obj)
  • This one is a nice, possibly one-liner, solution – rekam Sep 26 '18 at 9:20
0

With Lodash:

_.omitBy({a: 1, b: null}, (v) => !v)
0

If you prefer the pure/functional approach

const stripUndef = obj => 
  Object.keys(obj)
   .reduce((p, c) => ({ ...p, ...(x[c] === undefined ? { } : { [c]: x[c] })}), {});
0

If you don't want to modify the original object (using some ES6 operators):

const keys = Object.keys(objectWithNulls).filter(key => objectWithNulls[key]);
const pairs = keys.map(key => ({ [key]: objectWithNulls[key] }));

const objectWithoutNulls = pairs.reduce((val, acc) => ({ ...val, ...acc }));

The filter(key => objectWithNulls[key])returns anything that is truthy, so will reject any values such as0 or false, as well as undefined or null. Can be easily changed to filter(key => objectWithNulls[key] !== undefined)or something similar if this is unwanted behaviour.

0

You can do a recursive removal in one line using json.stringify's replacer argument

const removeNullValues = obj => (
  JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj, (k,v) => v==null?undefined:v))
)

Usage:

removeNullValues({a:{x:1,y:null,z:undefined}}) // Returns {a:{x:1}}
0

Recursively remove null, undefined, empty objects and empty arrays, returning a copy (ES6 version)

export function skipEmpties(dirty) {
    let item;
    if (Array.isArray(dirty)) {
        item = dirty.map(x => skipEmpties(x)).filter(value => value !== undefined);
        return item.length ? item : undefined;
    } else if (dirty && typeof dirty === 'object') {
        item = {};
        Object.keys(dirty).forEach(key => {
            const value = skipEmpties(dirty[key]);
            if (value !== undefined) {
                item[key] = value;
            }
        });
        return Object.keys(item).length ? item : undefined;
    } else {
        return dirty === null ? undefined : dirty;
    }
}

protected by Community Aug 22 '18 at 3:40

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