I found those similar questions Lambda expressions as class template parameters and How to use a lambda expression as a template parameter?, but even with the answers available I didnt get why the following code isn't working (g++4.8.2 and g++-4.9):

auto GoLess = [](int a,int b) -> bool
{
        return a < b;
};


template<typename Order>
struct foo
{
        int val;
        bool operator<(const foo& other)
        {
                return Order(val, other.val);
        }
};

typedef foo<decltype(GoLess)> foo_t;

int main()
{
        foo_t a,b;
        bool r = a < b;
}

The compiler output is:

test.cpp: In instantiation of ‘bool foo<Order>::operator<(const foo<Order>&) [with Order = <lambda(int, int)>]’:
test.cpp:26:15:   required from here
test.cpp:17:30: error: no matching function for call to ‘<lambda(int, int)>::__lambda0(int&, const int&)’
   return Order(val, other.val);
                              ^
test.cpp:17:30: note: candidates are:
test.cpp:5:16: note: constexpr<lambda(int, int)>::<lambda>(const<lambda(int, int)>&)
 auto GoLess = [](int a,int b) -> bool
                ^
test.cpp:5:16: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 2 provided
test.cpp:5:16: note: constexpr<lambda(int, int)>::<lambda>(<lambda(int, int)>&&)
test.cpp:5:16: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 2 provided

Shouldn't this code work? Reading from those other threads in my understanding this code should compile, but is not.

Thanks a lot

Addendum:

To clarify a little, in on of the above questions KennyTM wrote the following code:

auto comp = [](const A& lhs, const A& rhs) -> bool { return lhs.x < rhs.x; };
auto SetOfA = std::set <A, decltype(comp)> (comp);

Which should work, the second argument to std::set is a 'comparator' which in this case is a lambda, in my code I'm trying to do the same or at least i think i'm doing the same, but my code is not working. Something i missing in my code?

Please note also from Xeo in Lambda expressions as class template parameters

auto my_comp = [](const std::string& left, const std::string& right) -> bool {
  // whatever
}

typedef std::unordered_map<
  std::string,
  std::string,
  std::hash<std::string>,
  decltype(my_comp)
  > map_type;

Again this should work. Where's my fault?

Thanks

  • Please explain why you think the code should compile. (It might affect the answers.) – user3920237 Feb 19 '15 at 21:13
  • const. Check your consts. – John Feb 19 '15 at 21:21
up vote 9 down vote accepted

As the compiler is helpfully telling you, the problem is with this line:

return Order(val, other.val);

Since Order is a type (and not a function), that is calling Order's two-argument constructor. But it doesn't have one.

The correct syntax for invoking a functional class is:

return Order()(val, other.val);

However, that won't work either because the class generated for the lambda has a deleted default constructor.

In short, you need to instantiate your class with (the only) instance of the lambda.

Here's one possible way to proceed:

template<typename Order>
struct foo {
    foo(Order compare) : compare_(compare) {}
    bool operator<(const foo& other) {
        return compare_(val, other.val);
    }
    int val;
    Order compare_;
};

/* In practice, you'll want to template a parameter pack
 * for the other arguments to the constructor, since those are likely.
 * Also, you might want to use std::forward.
 */
template<typename Order>
foo<Order> foomaker(Order order) {
    return foo<Order>(order);
}

int main() {
    auto GoLess = [](int a,int b) -> bool
        {
             return a < b;
        };

    auto a = foomaker(GoLess);
    auto b = foomaker(GoLess);
    bool r = a < b;
    return r;
}
  • 1
    Namely, other than decltype(GoLess), GoLess itself needs to be provided and passed to the constructor of foo. – EyasSH Feb 19 '15 at 21:32

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