1

Having a curious time figuring out why this doesn't seem to work.

I have a CSS background gradient applied, for example:

.element {
  width: 10cm;
  height: 5cm;
  background-size: 1cm;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(
    90deg,
    red,
    black
  );
}
.child {
  width: 1cm;
  height: 1cm;
  background: green;
  outline: 1px solid black;
  float:left;
}
.child:before {
  content: "1cm";
  color: white;
}
<div class="element">
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

Now, when viewing (this is from Chrome, but I see similar results in other browsers) the lines do not match up with the element. I would expect to see 10 evenly spaced "backgrounds" that repeat, with the right-most lining up exactly with the edge of the element.

What accounts for this extra space?

http://codepen.io/anon/pen/JoLVem

In the codepen example, I have an element with the background I want, and that element has 10 children. Parent is 10cm, children are 1cm. Exactly 10 children fit inside the parent because 1cm * 10 = 10cm.

The background, however, is repeating a 1cm wide gradient. This should result in precisely 10 background repeats across an element that is 10cm wide. As you can see, each background image is somehow less than 1cm.

  • first thing to try is setting width:100% & background-size :10% – maioman Feb 19 '15 at 22:55
  • Why are people downvoting this question? – dave Feb 20 '15 at 19:09
5

CSS units don't necessarily equate to exact dimensions. In the end, every CSS measurement displayed on a screen is eventually calculated in pixels.

CSS assumes screens will have 96 dpi, so using in, pt, and pc is usually safe, although different monitor resolutions, or user-defined zooming may affect your results.

Metric units are a different story though, as there is no exact calculation to pixels, so the numbers are rounded by the browser to deliver a result that will be close to the specified measurement. This is one of the reasons that the W3C only recommends px, %, or em units for screen targeted layouts.

In your example:

1cm ≈ 37px or 38px 
10cm ≈ 370px

The only alternative would be to standardize at the millimeter level at 3 or 4 px per mm. That is no good because it isn't going to get you close to centimeter measurements at larger levels.

As you can see in the example below, this works correctly in inch units because the calculation to pixels is exact:

.element {
    background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(
    	90deg,
    	white,
    	black 100%
    );
    background-size: 1in;
    width: 5in;
    height: 4in;
}

.child {
  width: 1in;
  height: 1in;
  background: green;
  outline: 1px solid black;
  float:left;
}
.child:before {
  content: "1in";
  color: white;
}
<div class="element">
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

  • I'm not so worried about the units being exact, what I am concerned about is that an element with a width of 10cm and a repeating background size of 1cm doesn't give me 10 background repeats. Shouldn't 1cm = 1cm no matter what? – pspahn Feb 19 '15 at 23:08
  • I see what you mean--you're concerned with the units being consistent--not necessarily wether they match a cm or not – Ted Feb 20 '15 at 0:32
  • Question clarified. – pspahn Feb 20 '15 at 17:51
  • If this is the case, I would consider that a bug as my example shows the calculation does not suffer rounding issues when sizing element directly. – pspahn Feb 20 '15 at 18:29
  • @pspahn Actually, your example does suffer rounding errors, they're just too small to notice. Use the chrome inspector to see that some of your green box widths are 37px and some are 38px. See my updated answer for better explanation on why there is no alternative. – dave Feb 20 '15 at 18:53
0

Setting background-size :10% will fix it.


that said if you use pixel values it works correctly

.element {
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(90deg, white, black 100%);
  background-size: 30px;
  width: 300px;
  height: 100px;
  border: 1px solid #000000;
}
<div class="element"></div>

  • This defeats the purpose. Units need to be dimensional. It also doesn't answer the question. – pspahn Feb 19 '15 at 23:18
  • pixel values are dimensional I believe – maioman Feb 19 '15 at 23:21
  • If you want to be a pedant, go for it. – pspahn Feb 19 '15 at 23:23
  • trying to be constructive – maioman Feb 19 '15 at 23:39
-1

Give the background elements a percentage width:

.element {
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(90deg, white, black 100%);
  background-size: 10%;
  width: 300px;
  height: 100px;
  border: 1px solid #000000;
}
<div class="element"></div>

  • This defeats the purpose. Units need to be dimensional. – pspahn Feb 19 '15 at 23:09
  • Good idea (not to mention manners) to down vote people trying to assist. If you are looking for a reason, not a solution, take a look at your console and consider rounding errors. – sideroxylon Feb 19 '15 at 23:52
  • I downvote when people give me an answer to a question I did not ask. Thanks for trying. – pspahn Feb 20 '15 at 0:04

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