2

So we have and array of hashes

array = [
  {id: 1, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 2, parent_id: 1},
  {id: 3, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 4, parent_id: 2}
]
target_array = []

What is the most efficient and ruby way to map/sort that array to the following result:

target_array = [
  {id:1,children:
    [{id: 2, children: [
      {id:4, children:[]}]}]},
  {id: 3, children:[]}  
]

p.s.The most I am capable of is iterating whole thing for each item and excluding from array hash that is already mapped to target_array.

0
3

You can solve this with recursion :

@array = [
  {id: 1, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 2, parent_id: 1},
  {id: 3, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 4, parent_id: 2}
]


def build_hierarchy target_array, n
    @array.select { |h| h[:parent_id] == n }.each do |h|
      target_array << {id: h[:id], children: build_hierarchy([], h[:id])}
    end
    target_array
end


build_hierarchy [], 0

Output :

=> [{"id"=>1, "children"=>[{"id"=>2, "children"=>[{"id"=>4, "children"=>[]}]}]}, {"id"=>3, "children"=>[]}] 

Live example in this ruby fiddle http://rubyfiddle.com/riddles/9b643

1
  • 1
    I also just tried to solve by hash. But I think your approach is more cleaner 1+
    – Gagan Gami
    Feb 20 '15 at 11:00
2

I would use recursion, but the following could easily be converted to a non-recursive method.

First construct a hash linking parents to their children (p2c). For this, use the form of Hash#update (aka merge!) that uses a block to determine the values of keys that are present in both hashes being merged:

@p2c = array.each_with_object({}) { |g,h|
  h.update(g[:parent_id]=>[g[:id]]) { |_,ov,nv| ov+nv } }
  #=> {0=>[1, 3], 1=>[2], 2=>[4]} 

There are many other ways to construct this hash. Here's another:

@p2c = Hash[array.group_by { |h| h[:parent_id] }
                 .map { |k,v| [k, v.map { |g| g[:id] }] }]

Now construct a recursive method whose lone argument is a parent:

def family_tree(p=0)
  return [{ id: p, children: [] }] unless @p2c.key?(p)
  @p2c[p].each_with_object([]) { |c,a|
    a << { id:c, children: family_tree(c) } }
end

We obtain:

family_tree
  #=> [ { :id=>1, :children=>
  #               [
  #                { :id=>2, :children=>
  #                          [
  #                            { :id=>4, :children=>[] }
  #                          ]
  #                }
  #              ]
  #    },
  #    { :id=>3, :children=>[] }
  #  ] 

Constructing the hash @p2c initially should make it quite efficient.

1

This is what I tried my way using Hash

array = [
  {id: 1, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 2, parent_id: 1},
  {id: 3, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 4, parent_id: 2}
]

  target_hash = Hash.new { |h,k| h[k] = { id: nil, children: [ ] } }

  array.each do |n|
      id, parent_id = n.values_at(:id, :parent_id)
      target_hash[id][:id] = n[:id]
      target_hash[parent_id][:children].push(target_hash[id])  
  end
 puts target_hash[0]

Output:

{:id=>nil, :children=>[{:id=>1, :children=>[{:id=>2, :children=>[{:id=>4, :children=>[]}]}]}, {:id=>3, :children=>[]}]}
1

I think the best one will have O(nlog(n)) time complexity at most. I'm giving my non-hash one :

array = [
  {id: 1, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 2, parent_id: 1},
  {id: 3, parent_id: 0},
  {id: 4, parent_id: 2}
]

# This takes O(nlog(n)).
array.sort! do |a, b|
    k = (b[:parent_id] <=> b[:parent_id])
    k == 0 ? b[:id] <=> a[:id] : k
end

# This takes O(n)
target_array = array.map do |node|
    { id: node[:id], children: [] }
end

# This takes O(nlog(n))
target_array.each_with_index do |node, index|
    parent = target_array[index + 1...target_array.size].bsearch do |target_node|
        target_node[:id] == array[index][:parent_id]
    end
    if parent
        parent[:children] << node
        target_array[index] = nil
    end
end

# O(n)
target_array.reverse.compact
# =>
# [{:id => 1, :children =>[{:id=>2,:children=> [ {:id=>4, 
# :children=>[]}]}]},
# {:id=>3, :children=>[]} ] 

So mine uses O(nlog(n)) in general.

By the way, when I simply tested out the existing solutions I found Gagan Gami's to be most efficient (slightly ahead of mine), I believe it's O(nlog(n)) too, though not obvious. But the currently accepted solution takes O(n^2) time.

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