44

I have 2 apps installed in my Django Project "aplikacja"

The first one named: "Godzina"

from django.db import models

class Godzina (models.Model):
        GODZINA = (
        ('19', '19'),
        ('20', '20'),
        ('21', '21'),
        )
        godzina = models.CharField(max_length=6, choices=GODZINA, verbose_name='jezyk')

and the second named: "UserProfile"

from django.db import models
from django.contrib.auth.models import User
from godzina.models import Godzina

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    czas = models.ForeignKey('Godzina')   
    user = models.OneToOneField(User)

I'm getting this error:

userprofile.UserProfile.czas: (fields.E300) Field defines a relation with model 'Godzina', which is either not installed, or is abstract.

What does this error mean? I would like to make it so the User can only pick such times as an administrator puts in the app "Godzina" For example I'm defining hours 19 pm, 20 pm and then the user can choose those values in the UserProfile app.

Is it possible to fix this problem?

9 Answers 9

66

You should add the app name to the related model name in the FK definition:

czas = models.ForeignKey('firstapp.Godzina') 
2
  • 9
    My setup has identical systems but this fix does not work for me.
    – rschwieb
    Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 16:44
  • 4
    This works because the foreign key you may be using without adding the "firstapp." to the model may be within the same models.py file. When you are using an external model (model from a different app), you need to specify the app that contains that model.
    – Tim S.
    Commented May 23, 2018 at 15:00
5

A generic information when using the models from one app to another app is

model_variable = models.ForeignKey('the_appname.the_model_class_name')

In this case,for the Django-project “aplikacja”, for the second app(UserProfile) it should be :

czas = models.ForeignKey(‘Godzina.Godzina') 

After this I suggest you remove all the files in the migrations folder(under the apps you created: Godzina and UserProfile) except the init file. Also remove the SQLite file. Then run Python manage.py makemigrations and python manage.py migrate. These steps should most probably fix the problem.

3

Not related to OPs scenario but one potential mistake that will cause the same above error is specifying wrong app_label in Meta

class ABC(models.Model):
    foo = models.TextField()

    class Meta:
        app_label = 'appp'

class XYZ(models.Model):
    abc = models.ForeignKey('ABC', on_delete=models.CASCADE)

    class Meta:
        app_label = 'app'

Errors:

django.core.management.base.SystemCheckError: SystemCheckError: System check identified some issues:

ERRORS:
app.XYZ.abc: (fields.E300) Field defines a relation with model 'ABC', which is either not installed, or is abstract.
app.XYZ.abc: (fields.E307) The field app.XYZ.abc was declared with a lazy reference to 'app.abc', but app 'app' doesn't provide model 'abc'.
1
  • This was the issue I was facing as well, thanks for sharing your fix - it worked for me. Commented Apr 23, 2023 at 16:08
2
from django.db import models
from django.contrib.auth.models import User

from godzina.models import Godzina

class UserProfile(models.Model):

    czas = models.ForeignKey('Godzina')   

    user = models.OneToOneField(User)

    class Meta:     #you have to add abstract class
        abstract = True
3
  • 2
    Code only answers arent encouraged as they dont provide much information for future readers please provide some explanation to what you have written Commented Jun 29, 2018 at 10:14
  • 4
    To explain this answer better, if you have declared abstract = True in Meta class within the model where your relationship points to, you'll get the error. It happened to me when I switched from an ArrayField to ManyToManyField, and forgot to remove abstract from the model.
    – Qumber
    Commented Aug 26, 2020 at 9:56
  • The solution is to remove abstract = True from Meta from the model the ForeignKey points to Commented Jul 12, 2021 at 14:15
2

If you arrived here by search, it might help you to have a reminder to check that you remembered to make your class a model (just in case, like me, you were blindly looking for more complicated reasons for a few minutes!)

If you didn't inherit from models.Model you'd get the error described by the OP:

class Godzina:
   ...

Make sure you've got:

class Godzina(models.Model):
   ...
2

I had the same error, and it was an issue due to the similar names of the classes.

1

More clarity for users that may encounter similar problem. It may be confusing if the app name and the model name is the same, for example the app name is "student", and in student/models, you have a class called Student, which inherits models.Model

place holder implementation:

model_variable = models.ForeignKey('the_appname.the_model_class_name)

more precise example: with an app name as student and model name also Student, and another app attendance, with an attribute "student_id"

student_id = models.ForeignKey('student.student)
1

run into the same issue in

django-simple-history==2.10.0, django=2.2.13

to fix it I need to indicate model instead of using it name str 'Godzina'

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    czas = models.ForeignKey(Godzina, on_delete=xxxxx)   
0

I had a similar error message. It turned out that it was because I had duplicated definitions of the class Godzina, in your example

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