223

What's the standard way to call static methods? I can think of using constructor or using the name of the class itself, I don't like the latter since it doesn't feel necessary. Is the former the recommended way, or is there something else?

Here's a (contrived) example:

class SomeObject {
  constructor(n){
    this.n = n;
  }

  static print(n){
    console.log(n);
  }

  printN(){
    this.constructor.print(this.n);
  }
}
8
  • 9
    SomeObject.print feels natural. But this.n inside makes no sense since there is no instance, if we are talking about static methods.
    – dfsq
    Commented Feb 20, 2015 at 11:32
  • 4
    @dfsq printN is not static though.
    – simonzack
    Commented Feb 20, 2015 at 11:38
  • You are right, confused names.
    – dfsq
    Commented Feb 20, 2015 at 11:40
  • 2
    I am curious why this question does not have so many upvotes! Isn't this a common practice for creating utility functions?
    – Thoran
    Commented Dec 1, 2015 at 14:43
  • @Thoran no, not really common practice. An anti-pattern, more like. Typically static and non-static methods are radically different. Unifying them can be done (as demonstrated) but actually serves no useful OOP purpose. Instance methods work on an instance using the data from that instance. Just forwarding the call to a static method does none of that. Moreover, static methods are often a signal of where OOP itself breaks down as it's the only way to model non-instance blocks of functionality. For which JS already has functions anyway.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 20:40

3 Answers 3

256

Both ways are viable, but they do different things when it comes to inheritance with an overridden static method. Choose the one whose behavior you expect:

class Super {
  static whoami() {
    return "Super";
  }
  lognameA() {
    console.log(Super.whoami());
  }
  lognameB() {
    console.log(this.constructor.whoami());
  }
}
class Sub extends Super {
  static whoami() {
    return "Sub";
  }
}
new Sub().lognameA(); // Super
new Sub().lognameB(); // Sub

Referring to the static property via the class will be actually static and constantly give the same value. Using this.constructor instead will use dynamic dispatch and refer to the class of the current instance, where the static property might have the inherited value but could also be overridden.

This matches the behavior of Python, where you can choose to refer to static properties either via the class name or the instance self.

If you expect static properties not to be overridden (and always refer to the one of the current class), like in Java, use the explicit reference.

6
  • can you explain the constructor property vs class method definition?
    – Chris
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 19:32
  • 2
    @Chris: Every class is a constructor function (just like you know it from ES5 without class syntax), there is no difference in the definition of the method. It's just a matter of how you look it up, via the inherited constructor property or directly by its name.
    – Bergi
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 20:09
  • 1
    Another example is PHP's Late Static Bindings. Not only does this.constructor respect inheritance, but also helps you avoid having to update code if you change the class name. Commented Jul 19, 2018 at 14:28
  • 1
    @ricanontherun Having to update the code when you change variable names is not an argument against using names. Also refactoring tools can do it automatically anyway.
    – Bergi
    Commented Jul 19, 2018 at 16:29
  • 1
    How to implement this in typescript ? It gives the error Property 'staticProperty' does not exist on type 'Function'
    – ayZagen
    Commented Mar 28, 2019 at 18:12
86

I stumbled over this thread searching for answer to similar case. Basically all answers are found, but it's still hard to extract the essentials from them.

Kinds of Access

Assume a class Foo probably derived from some other class(es) with probably more classes derived from it.

Then accessing:

  • from static method/getter of Foo class:
    • some probably overridden static method/getter:
      • this.method()
      • this.property
    • some probably overridden instance method/getter:
      • impossible by design
    • own non-overridden static method/getter:
      • Foo.method()
      • Foo.property
    • own non-overridden instance method/getter:
      • impossible by design
  • from instance method/getter of Foo class:
    • some probably overridden static method/getter:
      • this.constructor.method()
      • this.constructor.property
    • some probably overridden instance method/getter:
      • this.method()
      • this.property
    • own non-overridden static method/getter:
      • Foo.method()
      • Foo.property
    • own non-overridden instance method/getter:
      • not possible by intention unless using some workaround:
        • Foo.prototype.method.call( this )
        • Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(Foo.prototype,'<property>' ).get.call(this)

Keep in mind that using this isn't working this way when using arrow functions or invoking methods/getters explicitly bound to custom value.

Background

  • When in context of an instance's method/getter
    • this is referring to current instance.
    • super is basically referring to same instance, but somewhat addressing methods/getters written in context of some class current one is extending (by using the prototype of Foo's prototype).
    • definition of instance's class used on creating it is available per this.constructor.
  • When in context of a static method/getter there is no "current instance" by intention and so:
    • this is available to refer to the definition of current class directly.
    • super is not referring to some instance either, but to static methods/getters written in context of some class current one is extending.

Conclusion

Try this code:

class A {
  constructor( input ) {
    this.loose = this.constructor.getResult( input );
    this.tight = A.getResult( input );
    console.log( this.scaledProperty, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor( A.prototype, "scaledProperty" ).get.call( this ) );
  }

  get scaledProperty() {
    return parseInt( this.loose ) * 100;
  }
  
  static getResult( input ) {
    return input * this.scale;
  }
  
  static get scale() {
    return 2;
  }
}

class B extends A {
  constructor( input ) {
    super( input );
    this.tight = B.getResult( input ) + " (of B)";
  }
  
  get scaledProperty() {
    return parseInt( this.loose ) * 10000;
  }

  static get scale() {
    return 4;
  }
}

class C extends B {
  constructor( input ) {
    super( input );
  }
  
  static get scale() {
    return 5;
  }
}

class D extends C {
  constructor( input ) {
    super( input );
  }
  
  static getResult( input ) {
    return super.getResult( input ) + " (overridden)";
  }
  
  static get scale() {
    return 10;
  }
}


let instanceA = new A( 4 );
console.log( "A.loose", instanceA.loose );
console.log( "A.tight", instanceA.tight );

let instanceB = new B( 4 );
console.log( "B.loose", instanceB.loose );
console.log( "B.tight", instanceB.tight );

let instanceC = new C( 4 );
console.log( "C.loose", instanceC.loose );
console.log( "C.tight", instanceC.tight );

let instanceD = new D( 4 );
console.log( "D.loose", instanceD.loose );
console.log( "D.tight", instanceD.tight );

6
  • 1
    Own non-overridden instance method/getter / not possible by intention unless using some workaround --- That's a real pity. In my opinion, this is a shortcoming of ES6+. Maybe it should be updated to allow simply referring to method -- i.e. method.call(this). Better than Foo.prototype.method. Babel/etc. could implement using an NFE (named function expression).
    – Roy Tinker
    Commented Oct 5, 2017 at 18:13
  • method.call( this ) is a probable solution except for the method isn't bound to the desired base "class" then and thus fails to be a non-overriden instance method/getter. It's always possible to work with class-independent methods that way. Nonetheless I don't think current design is that bad. In context of objects of class derived from your base class Foo there may be good reasons to override an instance method. That overriden method may have good reasons to invoke its super implementation or not. Either case is eligible and should be obeyed. Otherwise it would end in bad OOP design. Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 9:32
  • Despite the OOP sugar, ES methods are still functions, and people will want to use and reference them as such. My problem with ES class syntax is that it provides no direct reference to the currently executing method -- something that used to be easy via arguments.callee or an NFE.
    – Roy Tinker
    Commented Oct 26, 2017 at 19:58
  • Sounds like bad practice or at least bad software design anyway. I'd consider both points of view contrary to each other, as I don't see eligible reason in context of OOP paradigm that involves accessing currently invoked method by reference (which is not just its context as is available via this). It sound like trying to mix benefits of pointer arithmetics of bare C with higher-level C#. Just out of curiosity: what would you use arguments.callee for in cleanly designed OOP code? Commented Nov 27, 2017 at 11:48
  • I'm working in a large project built with Dojo's class system, which allows calling the superclass(es) implementation(s) of the current method via this.inherited(currentFn, arguments); -- where currentFn is a reference to the currently executing function. Not being able to reference the currently executing function directly is making it a little hairy in TypeScript, which takes its class syntax from ES6.
    – Roy Tinker
    Commented Nov 27, 2017 at 18:28
22

If you are planning on doing any kind of inheritance, then I would recommend this.constructor. This simple example should illustrate why:

class ConstructorSuper {
  constructor(n){
    this.n = n;
  }

  static print(n){
    console.log(this.name, n);
  }

  callPrint(){
    this.constructor.print(this.n);
  }
}

class ConstructorSub extends ConstructorSuper {
  constructor(n){
    this.n = n;
  }
}

let test1 = new ConstructorSuper("Hello ConstructorSuper!");
console.log(test1.callPrint());

let test2 = new ConstructorSub("Hello ConstructorSub!");
console.log(test2.callPrint());
  • test1.callPrint() will log ConstructorSuper Hello ConstructorSuper! to the console
  • test2.callPrint() will log ConstructorSub Hello ConstructorSub! to the console

The named class will not deal with inheritance nicely unless you explicitly redefine every function that makes a reference to the named Class. Here is an example:

class NamedSuper {
  constructor(n){
    this.n = n;
  }

  static print(n){
    console.log(NamedSuper.name, n);
  }

  callPrint(){
    NamedSuper.print(this.n);
  }
}

class NamedSub extends NamedSuper {
  constructor(n){
    this.n = n;
  }
}

let test3 = new NamedSuper("Hello NamedSuper!");
console.log(test3.callPrint());

let test4 = new NamedSub("Hello NamedSub!");
console.log(test4.callPrint());
  • test3.callPrint() will log NamedSuper Hello NamedSuper! to the console
  • test4.callPrint() will log NamedSuper Hello NamedSub! to the console

See all the above running in Babel REPL.

You can see from this that test4 still thinks it's in the super class; in this example it might not seem like a huge deal, but if you are trying to reference member functions that have been overridden or new member variables, you'll find yourself in trouble.

3
  • 3
    But static function are no overridden member methods? Usually you are trying not to reference any overridden stuff statically.
    – Bergi
    Commented Feb 21, 2015 at 12:14
  • 2
    @Bergi I'm not sure I understand what you are pointing out, but one specific case I have come across would is with MVC model hydration patterns. Sub classes extending a model may want to implement a static hydrate function. However, when these are hard-coded in, base model instances are only ever returned. This is a pretty specific example, but many patterns that rely on having a static collection of registered instances would be effected by this. One big disclaimer is that we are trying to simulate classical inheritance here, rather than prototypal inheritance... And that is not popular :P Commented Feb 24, 2015 at 19:29
  • 1
    Yeah, as I concluded now in my own answer this is not even solved consistently in "classical" inheritance - sometimes you might want overrides, sometimes not. The first part of my comment pointed at static class functions, which I did not consider to be "members". Better ignore it :-)
    – Bergi
    Commented Feb 24, 2015 at 19:36

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