37

Context
I was asked the following puzzle by one of my friends:

void fn(void)
{
  /* write something after this comment so that the program output is 10 */
  /* write something before this comment */
}

int main()
{
  int i = 5;
  fn();
  printf("%d\n", i);
  return 0;
}

I know there can be multiple solutions, some involving macro and some assuming something about the implementation and violating C.

One particular solution I was interested in is to make certain assumptions about stack and write following code: (I understand it is undefined behavior, but may work as expected on many implementations)

void fn(void)
{
  /* write something after this comment so that the program output is 10 */
  int a[1] = {0};
  int j = 0;
  while(a[j] != 5) ++j;  /* Search stack until you find 5 */
  a[j] = 10;             /* Overwrite it with 10 */
  /* write something before this comment */
}

Problem
This program worked fine in MSVC and gcc without optimization. But when I compiled it with gcc -O2 flag or tried on ideone, it loops infinitely in function fn.

My Observation
When I compiled the file with gcc -S vs gcc -S -O2 and compared, it clearly shows gcc kept an infinite loop in function fn.

Question
I understand because the code invokes undefined behavior, one can not call it a bug. But why and how does compiler analyze the behavior and leave an infinite loop at O2?


Many people commented to know the behavior if some of the variables are changed to volatile. The result as expected is:

  • If i or j is changed to volatile, program behavior remains same.
  • If array a is made volatile, program does not suffer infinite loop.
  • Moreover if I apply the following patch
-  int a[1] = {0};
+  int aa[1] = {0};
+  int *a = aa;

The program behavior remains same (infinite loop)

If I compile the code with gcc -O2 -fdump-tree-optimized, I get the following intermediate file:

;; Function fn (fn) (executed once)

Removing basic block 3
fn ()
{
<bb 2>:

<bb 3>:
  goto <bb 3>;

}



;; Function main (main) (executed once)

main ()
{
<bb 2>:
  fn ();

}
Invalid sum of incoming frequencies 0, should be 10000

This verifies the assertions made after the answers below.

  • 3
    A possible solution to the puzzle is to put return; in the body of the function (before the comment write something before this comment), and put i = 10; before or after the call to fn (which is after the comment write something after this comment). This is probably the intended solution, but I like your tack better. – 2012rcampion Feb 20 '15 at 16:42
  • 20
    Inside void fn() printf("%d\n", 10); exit(0); No UB. – chux - Reinstate Monica Feb 20 '15 at 17:14
  • 3
    @chux I like that better than mine, which was #define fn() i=10. – Mark B Feb 20 '15 at 18:00
  • 2
    I'm not interested in alternative solutions. I want to know why infinite loop with this solution. – Mohit Jain Feb 21 '15 at 3:10
  • 1
    A cery similar thing is described and explained here blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2014/06/27/10537746.aspx – Pawel Feb 25 '15 at 5:34
52

This is undefined behavior so the compiler can really do anything at all, we can find a similar example in GCC pre-4.8 Breaks Broken SPEC 2006 Benchmarks, where gcc takes a loop with undefined behavior and optimizes it to:

L2:
    jmp .L2

The article says (emphasis mine):

Of course this is an infinite loop. Since SATD() unconditionally executes undefined behavior (it’s a type 3 function), any translation (or none at all) is perfectly acceptable behavior for a correct C compiler. The undefined behavior is accessing d[16] just before exiting the loop. In C99 it is legal to create a pointer to an element one position past the end of the array, but that pointer must not be dereferenced. Similarly, the array cell one element past the end of the array must not be accessed.

which if we examine your program with godbolt we see:

fn:
.L2:
    jmp .L2

The logic being used by the optimizer probably goes something like this:

  • All the elements of a are initialized to zero
  • a is never modified before or within the loop
  • So a[j] != 5 is always true -> infinite loop
  • Because of the infinite, the a[j] = 10; is unreachable and so that can be optimized away, so can a and j since they are no longer needed to determine the loop condition.

which is similar to the case in the article which given:

int d[16];

analyzes the following loop:

for (dd=d[k=0]; k<16; dd=d[++k]) 

like this:

upon seeing d[++k], is permitted to assume that the incremented value of k is within the array bounds, since otherwise undefined behavior occurs. For the code here, GCC can infer that k is in the range 0..15. A bit later, when GCC sees k<16, it says to itself: “Aha– that expression is always true, so we have an infinite loop.”

Perhaps an interesting secondary point, is whether an infinite loop is considered observable behavior(w.r.t. to the as-if rule) or not, which effects whether an infinite loop can also be optimized away. We can see from C Compilers Disprove Fermat’s Last Theorem that before C11 there was at least some room for interpretation:

Many knowledgeable people (including me) read this as saying that the termination behavior of a program must not be changed. Obviously some compiler writers disagree, or else don’t believe that it matters. The fact that reasonable people disagree on the interpretation would seem to indicate that the C standard is flawed.

C11 adds clarification to section 6.8.5 Iteration statements and is covered in more detail in this answer.

| improve this answer | |
  • I wish the Standard would define some normative models for various forms of Undefined Behavior. Many programs could benefit from a behavioral model which didn't allow totally-unconstrained UB, but would allow many useful optimizations. A fairly typical model would say that there may exist addresses which, if written or read, could cause other memory contents to be arbitrarily rewritten (read-triggered addresses are hardly unknown in the real world), and that compilers could arrange variables such that out-of-bounds array accesses would hit such addresses. Under such a model... – supercat Aug 5 '15 at 17:15
  • ...omission of the bounds check after d[k++] could be justified under an as-if rule. If code wished to specify a model where any read of any address would yield a value (true of some hardware platforms), or a model where any read of any address must either yield a value or trap in an implementation-defined fashion that would preclude subsequent code execution (true of many hardware platforms), omitting the bound check would change observable behavior. – supercat Aug 5 '15 at 17:21
20

In the optimized version, the compiler has decided a few things:

  1. The array a doesn't change before that test.
  2. The array a doesn't contain a 5.

Therefore, we can rewrite the code as:

void fn(void) {
  int a[1] = {0};
  int j = 0;
  while(true) ++j;
  a[j] = 10;
}

Now, we can make further decisions:

  1. All the code after the while loop is dead code (unreachable).
  2. j is written but never read. So we can get rid of it.
  3. a is never read.

At this point, your code has been reduced to:

void fn(void) {
  int a[1] = {0};
  while(true);
}

And we can make the note that a is now never read, so let's get rid of it as well:

void fn(void) {
  while(true);
}

Now, the unoptimized code:

In unoptimized generated code, the array will remain in memory. And you'll literally walk it at runtime. And it's possible that there will be a 5 thats readable after it once you walk past the end of the array.

Which is why the unoptimized version sometimes doesn't crash and burn.

| improve this answer | |
7

If the loop does get optimized out into an infinite loop, it could be due to static code analyzis seeing that your array is

  1. not volatile

  2. contains only 0

  3. never gets written to

and thus it is not possible for it to contain the number 5. Which means an infinite loop.

Even if it didn't do this, your approach could fail easily. For example, it's possible that some compiler would optimize your code without making your loop infinite, but would stuff the contents of i into a register, making it unavailable from the stack.

As a side note, I bet what your friend actually expected was this:

void fn(void)
{
  /* write something after this comment so that the program output is 10 */
  printf("10\n"); /* Output 10 */
  while(1); /* Endless loop, function won't return, i won't be output */
  /* write something before this comment */
}

or this (if stdlib.h is included):

void fn(void)
{
  /* write something after this comment so that the program output is 10 */
  printf("10\n"); /* Output 10 */
  exit(0); /* Exit gracefully */
  /* write something before this comment */
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Or } int main() { /* do whatever */ #define main this_is_not_main – jingyu9575 Feb 20 '15 at 16:38
  • Your first solution may well not actually output anything: you need an fflush before the while loop. – Emil Jeřábek Feb 20 '15 at 16:58
  • @EmilJeřábek: hmm, why do you think so? I was under the impression that printf flushes automatically on each newline... – Mints97 Feb 20 '15 at 17:08
  • 3
    No, that depends on the current buffering mode of stdout, which can be either set explicitly, or has an implementation defined default value. In practice, what I see is that stdout starts as line-buffered when connected to a terminal, and fully buffered otherwise, but YMMV. – Emil Jeřábek Feb 20 '15 at 17:18

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