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I'm just exploring Haskell for fun, and to learn about the language. I thought the following behavior was interesting, and I can't find the reason why this happens.

This is an often quoted piece of Haskell code which keeps calculating pi until interrupted, slightly modified to give a concatenated list of chars instead of a list of integers:

main :: IO ()
main =  do putStrLn pi'

pi' :: [Char]
pi' = concat . map show $ g(1,0,1,1,3,3) where
   g(q,r,t,k,n,l) =
      if 4*q+r-t<n*t
      then n : g(10*q,10*(r-n*t),t,k,div(10*(3*q+r))t-10*n,l)
      else g(q*k,(2*q+r)*l,t*l,k+1,div(q*(7*k+2)+r*l)(t*l),l+2)

If I run it from prelude, it starts concatenating a string resembling the digits of pi:

λ> putStrLn pi' 31415926535897932384626433832795028841971 ...etc

Works as expected, it instantly starts spewing out digits.

Now this is a piece of code I just quickly wrote which has the same structure. It's completely useless from a mathematical point of view, I was just messing around to find out how Haskell works. The operations are much simpler, but it does have the same type, and so does the sub function (except for the smaller tuple).

main :: IO ()
main =  do putStrLn func

func :: [Char]
func = concat . map show $ h(1,2,1) where
   h(a,b,c) =
     if a <= 1000
     then a : h((div a 1)+2*b,b,1)
     else h(b,div (b-3) (-1),div a a)

Same type of result from prelude:

λ> putStrLn func 1591317212529333741454953576165697377818589 ...etc

Works as expected, although much faster than the pi function of course, because the calculations are less complex.

Now for the part which confuses me:

If I compile: ghc pi.hs, and run my program: ./pi, the output stays blank forever, until I send an interrupt signal. At that moment, the whole calculated string of pi is instantly displayed. It doesn't "stream" the output into stdout, like GHCI does. OK, I know they don't always behave in the same way.

But next I run: ghc func.hs, and run my program: ./func... and it immediately starts printing the list of characters.

Where does this difference come from? I thought it might be because my stupid useless little function is (eventually) repeating, so the compiler can "predict" the output better?

Or is there another fundamental difference between the way the functions work? Or am I doing something utterly stupid?

Solution / Answer

Provided by Thomas & Daniel below, I was:

  1. Impatient. Large chunks eventually show up with the pi function, it's just a bit slow on my simple old coding machine.
  2. Not handling buffering in any way.

So after rewriting the main function:

import System.IO

main :: IO ()
main =  do hSetBuffering stdout NoBuffering
           putStrLn pi'

It was fixed!

  • 1
    "Where does this difference come from? I thought it might be because my stupid useless little function is (eventually) repeating, so the compiler can "predict" the output better?" - The compiler is not magic, that is not your solution. I would recommend reducing some of the noise in your code by reformatting it, you're doing some strange things in there. div a a is just 2, div a 1 is just a, div (b-3) (-1) is just negate (b-3). Also, it's good style to not use tuples for multiple function arguments, just use spaces h a b c = ... else h b (negate (b-3)) 1 for example. – bheklilr Feb 20 '15 at 23:00
  • I did those noisy things only to make the types match. The useless div operators force the type to become Integral. And normally I don't use tuples like that, but the existing pi function did so I just matched that. And, again: I didn't write down that function for mathematical functionality, or to be elegant or logical -- just to be similarly structured & equally typed. – okdewit Feb 20 '15 at 23:06
  • I've tried solving it from both sides: writing a function from the bottom up until it stops "blocking" the output, and removing things "top-down" from the pi function until it starts showing the output as a stream of characters... but I just can't pinpoint the part where it breaks down. – okdewit Feb 20 '15 at 23:13
  • 3
    I can not repeat your behavior - the compiled program outputs characters immediately. I suspect this is a buffering issue so try import System.IO and in main hSetBuffering stdout NoBuffering. – Thomas M. DuBuisson Feb 20 '15 at 23:40
  • 4
    I challenge this claim: "If I compile: ghc pi.hs, and run my program: ./pi, the output stays blank forever". In particular, I assert that the output stays blank until it has computed a large enough chunk of pi, then you get that chunk all at once. I think you just didn't wait long enough. If so, the difference between the two programs is just what you pointed out: your contrived example computes more digits more quickly. – Daniel Wagner Feb 21 '15 at 0:49
2

Provided by Thomas & Daniel in the comments, it turned out I was:

  1. Impatient. Large chunks eventually show up with the pi function, it's just a bit slow on my simple old coding machine.
  2. Not handling buffering in any way.

So after rewriting the main function:

import System.IO

main :: IO ()
main =  do hSetBuffering stdout NoBuffering
           putStrLn pi'

It was fixed!

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