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I'm made a small program that merges two arrays using merge sort algorithm but surprisingly it stops working when executed...it doesn't have any compilation errors.

#include<iostream> 
#include<array> 

using namespace std;

int main()

{
    // below are declarations of two single dimensional arrays and two variables

    int n1,n2,t1,t2,t3;
    int l1 [5] = {2,1,4,3,5};
    int l2 [5] = {8,6,7,9,10};
    int l3 [10];

    n1 = l1[4] - l1[0] +1;
    n2 = l2[4] - l2[0] +1;   


   //below are the declaration and initialization of two pointers

     t1 = l1[0];
     t2 = l2[0];
     t3 = l3[0];


      while((n1>0) && (n2>0) )

     {

         if (l1[t1] < l2[t2])
         {

             l3[t3] = l1[t1]; 
             t1++;
             t3++;

             n1--;
             cout<<l3[t3]<<endl;

          }
          else
            l3[t3] = l2[t2];
          t2++;
          t3++;
          n2--;

     } 

 }

I still didn't decide the output of the program

7
  • 1
    Run your code under a debugger to see where the exception occurs. – Jonathon Reinhart Feb 21 '15 at 15:04
  • Did you miss some brackets on your else? I edited the formatting so that your code is readable but to me it looks like you are missing some brackets. – drescherjm Feb 21 '15 at 15:06
  • Maybe everything after else is supposed to be in the else block? – Blob Feb 21 '15 at 15:49
  • i added the braces for the else block but its still stopping the execution. – user3059705 Feb 21 '15 at 16:18
  • 1
    Then its time to single step your code in your debugger. – drescherjm Feb 21 '15 at 17:21
1

You're very confused about pointers. This:

n1 = l1[4] - l1[0] + 1;

takes the value of l1[4], subtracts the value of l1[0], then adds 1. You seem to think l1[4] - l1[0] is going to give you the number of elements in the array, less 1. What you actually want here is:

n1 = sizeof l1 / sizeof l1[0];

Similarly, this:

t1 = l1[0];

doesn't make a "pointer" - t1 is just an int which contains the value of l1[0], not it's address. As pointed out in the comments, even if it were a pointer, you wouldn't be able to use it as an index. What you actually want is:

t1 = 0;

Finally, this:

while( (n1 > 0) && (n2 > 0) )

is going to stop after making it through just one of your arrays. What you want is:

while( (n1 > 0) || (n2 > 0) )

although this will break if l1 contains any elements higher than l2.

Here's a modified version of your program which implements your algorithm:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    int l1[5] = {2, 1, 4, 3, 5};
    int l2[5] = {8, 6, 7, 9, 10};
    int l3[10] = {0};

    int n1 = sizeof l1 / sizeof l1[0];
    int n2 = sizeof l2 / sizeof l2[0];
    int t1 = 0, t2 = 0, t3 = 0;

    while ( (n1 > 0) || (n2 > 0) ) {
        if ( l1[t1] < l2[t2] ) {
            l3[t3++] = l1[t1++];
            --n1;
        }
        else {
            l3[t3++] = l2[t2++];
            --n2;
        }
    }

    for ( int i = 0; i < sizeof l3 / sizeof l3[0]; ++i ) {
        std::cout << l3[i] << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

with output:

paul@horus:~/src/sandbox$ ./ms
2
1
4
3
5
8
6
7
9
10
paul@horus:~/src/sandbox$ 

Obviously, as implemented, your algorithm merges the two lists, but if they are not originally sorted then you won't end up with a sorted list. If you do want to end up with a sorted list, then you have some more work to do. Also, as noted above, your algorithm in general will not work correctly for most arrays.

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