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I have written a code that adds new random numbers to linked list in sorted order. Looks like it works properly but differs from what I have seen.

Could you take a look and say if it is efficient from the position of memory consumption or not?

I also heard that if to sort the list using a pointer to the location of current number (pointer to the pointer of location) then it would be the most efficient algorithm. Is it so?

void add (num*&head, int size) {

    num*temp = head;
    num*prev = 0;
    num*first = head;

    int n;
    int min = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i<size; i++){
    num*node = new num;
    node->n = rand()%100;
    cout << node->n << endl;

    if (head!=0) {
        if (prev != 0) {
            if (node->n < head->n){
                if (node->n < first->n) {
                    node->next = 0;
                    first->next = node;
                    first = node;
                }
                else { 
                temp = head;
                while (temp->next != 0)
                {
                    if (node->n <= temp->n && node->n >= temp->next->n) {
                        node->next = temp->next;
                        temp->next = node;
                        temp = head;
                        break;
                    }
                    else {
                        temp = temp->next;
                    }}}}
            else 
            {
                node->next = head;
                head = node;
                temp = head;
            }}
        else {
            if (node->n < temp->n){

                node->next = 0;
                temp->next = node;
                prev = node;
                first = prev;
            }
            else { 
                node->next = head;
                head = node;
                prev = node->next;
                first = prev;
            }}}
    else {
    node->next = head;
    head = node;
    temp = head;
    first = head;
    }}}
  • Efficient by which means exactly? Footprint, performance, memory consumption? – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 22 '15 at 13:21
  • yes, thanks for a remark - memory consumption – VVG Feb 22 '15 at 13:22
  • To save time, let's describe your algorithm with words: You have a sorted list, and defined operation insert(x), which finds the correct place for the new element x (by going from the beggining intil it finds right spot) and puts it in there, is that so? – Mr M. Feb 22 '15 at 13:23
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If your algorithm follows that sketched in the comment by MDo, then the search for the correct place could be made with fewer comparisons (by using larger steps than merely one element and reducing the step size as you home in). However, when using a linked list, this won't make your code much faster, since the traversal of the list still needs to visit each single element until you find the correct place (on average half of all elements so far). This will produce the same number of cache misses (which is the efficiency killer) as your simpler algorithm. Hence, keeping a linked list sorted while adding random elements cannot be done efficiently.

What can be done efficiently is to keep the list in heap order, while adding random elements (at a cost of O(log N) each). Finally, after adding all elements, it is straightforward to quickly obtain a sorted order from a heap order.

In fact, the heap-sort algorithm works this way: first arrange a random order into heap order and then obtain a sorted order (somewhat less efficient than quicksort on average).

| improve this answer | |
  • Actually, it works in next way: after adding first two elements, it sorts them out. Then the program compares new elements with the "head" and "tail". If our new element is somewhere between them, then code tries to find two numbers, so that the new one would be just between them. But, thank you for your remarks about your algorithm – VVG Feb 22 '15 at 13:57
  • @VVG that follows idea which I presented, with only a small optimization, which, in general, doesn't make a difference – Mr M. Feb 22 '15 at 14:09
1

This algorithm is, in fact, insertion sort (with a small optimization, beeing the lookup of the last sorted element).

It can be implemented to consume less memory. There is some memory that you use to maintain the list - pointer to next element, pointer to tail etc. You don't really need that, as a simple array would offer same functionality, but consume less memory.

@Walter allready mentioned heap, but there are also other modern sorting algorithms like Block sort which are both in-place AND stable.

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