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If I had an array of Birds that is filled during run-time, how can I access member methods specific to child classes?

class Bird
{
  public Bird() {}
  public void fly(int x) {
     System.out.println("Flew "+x+" meters");
  }
}
class DumbBird extends Bird
{
   public DumbBird() {super();}
   public void fly(int x) {
     x-=5; //we're dumb
     System.out.println("Flew "+x+" meters");
   }
   public void sing() {
      System.out.println("La la la!");
   }
}
public static void main(String[] args)
{
   Bird[] cage = new Bird[10];
   cage[0] = new Bird();
   cage[1] = new Dumbbird();
   cage[2] = new Sleepybird();
   //.... more bird types

   cage[1].sing(); //is inaccessable because it is of type Bird not DumbBird!
}

Is there a good way to be able to have a an array of generic types while being able to access member functions specific to a child class? I would like to not have to edit the Bird class.

  • 1
    No array can't be of generic type. Use List instead. – SMA Feb 22 '15 at 14:44
  • As SMA says use List instead or, if you are absolutely certain of the type you can use a cast to access the member function you require. – Jamie Reid Feb 22 '15 at 14:46
  • @JamieReid The proper way would be (DumbBird)(cage[1]).sing()? I get Syntax error, insert "AssignmentOperator Expression" to complete Assignment – dukevin Feb 22 '15 at 14:49
  • Why would you want to do this? By choosing to have a list of Birds you are saying that this can be any Bird. So there is no way to say the bird will be a specific subtype. – Bartlomiej Lewandowski Feb 22 '15 at 14:51
  • 1
    I've just run your code with " ((DumbBird) cage[1]).sing();" and it runs OK. You the parenthesis incorrect. Also if you want to use arrays, switch to Lists and use ArrayList<Bird> instead of Bird[] See the answer I put below, for a code sample taken from your code. – Jamie Reid Feb 22 '15 at 14:53
1

Just to remove my answer from the comments.

Switch to using lists instead of arrays and when you pull your specific bird out, you will need to cast it to the correct type of "Bird", see the below code example:

import java.util.ArrayList;

class Bird
{
  public void fly(int x) {
     System.out.println("Flew "+x+" meters");
  }
}

class DumbBird extends Bird
{
   public void fly(int x) {
     x-=5; //we're dumb
     System.out.println("Flew "+x+" meters");
   }

   public void sing() {
      System.out.println("La la la!");
   }
}

class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args)  {
       ArrayList<Bird> cage = new ArrayList<Bird>();
       cage.add(new Bird());
       cage.add(new DumbBird());
       cage.add(new Bird());
       cage.add(new DumbBird());
       cage.add(new SleepyBird());

       ((DumbBird) cage.get(1)).sing();
    }
}
  • I fail to see how switching from array to list is a benefit for the question the OP has. You still need to cast the objects in order to call certain methods. – Voicu Feb 22 '15 at 15:09
5

In theory, yes. Items put in arrays are reifiable, so you could determine which type you're looking at and cast the particular object to it's actual type. This isn't a very clean solution, though, so I wouldn't recommend it.

You may consider having an abstract class or interface representing bird that has methods most birds would support, along with a check method canSing() or canFly(). Birds that don't support this such as flightless birds can throw an UnsupportedOperationException if you try to call a method the bird doesn't support, but there is no easy way to generically reference all of the birds and know about all of the different methods each sub-type of bird can have.

  • this would be a much better implementation that what OP is actually going for and result in a much cleaner application in the end. To be quite honest, I prefer your answer to mine. – Jamie Reid Feb 22 '15 at 15:10

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