171

Can you please let me know how to get client IP address in ASP.NET when using MVC 6. Request.ServerVariables["REMOTE_ADDR"] does not work.

  • Example: httpContext.GetFeature<IHttpConnectionFeature>().RemoteIpAddress – Kiran Challa Feb 23 '15 at 18:01
  • The hold reason is available at the bottom of the question, "There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs." – Kevin Brown Feb 24 '15 at 3:58
  • 12
    I don't think the answer is long enough. It's a simple thing that we do in the older versions of MVC. I just asked how to do it in latest beta version. Secondly, if there are many answers, Why don't anyone just point me to the ONE of them. Infact, MVC 6 is beta and I think they didn't even read the question properly before holding it. – eadam Feb 24 '15 at 4:40
  • Edit your question showing more of what you've tried and a clear input/output. don't just complain that your question got closed without at least trying to improve it. – user764357 Mar 5 '15 at 0:05
  • 10
    Only programmers from the same domain should close the question. Anyone working in asp.net 5.0 will simply know what I am asking in fraction of a second. Rest of you are just punishing me for posting just a simple question. – eadam Mar 5 '15 at 4:16

10 Answers 10

235

The API has been updated. Not sure when it changed but according to Damien Edwards in late December, you can now do this:

var remoteIpAddress = request.HttpContext.Connection.RemoteIpAddress;
  • 9
    The RemoteIpAddress is always null for me, when I publish he website on IIS and log this on a file. – A-Sharabiani Feb 16 '16 at 18:52
  • 3
    Looks like the issue was fixed in rc 2 – Jon Oct 5 '16 at 15:26
  • 11
    I always get 127.0.0.1 even when I connect remotely – frostymarvelous Oct 21 '16 at 15:01
  • 21
    This is returning "::1" for me which is the IPv6 format. How are others seeing 127.0.0.1? – Derek Greer Oct 28 '16 at 15:36
  • 4
    Does anyone else get the local IP address of their IIS server returned? – dave317 Apr 13 '18 at 18:09
65

Some fallback logic can be added to handle the presence of a Load Balancer.

Also, through inspection, the X-Forwarded-For header happens to be set anyway even without a Load Balancer (possibly because of additional Kestrel layer?):

public string GetRequestIP(bool tryUseXForwardHeader = true)
{
    string ip = null;

    // todo support new "Forwarded" header (2014) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-Forwarded-For

    // X-Forwarded-For (csv list):  Using the First entry in the list seems to work
    // for 99% of cases however it has been suggested that a better (although tedious)
    // approach might be to read each IP from right to left and use the first public IP.
    // http://stackoverflow.com/a/43554000/538763
    //
    if (tryUseXForwardHeader)
        ip = GetHeaderValueAs<string>("X-Forwarded-For").SplitCsv().FirstOrDefault();

    // RemoteIpAddress is always null in DNX RC1 Update1 (bug).
    if (ip.IsNullOrWhitespace() && _httpContextAccessor.HttpContext?.Connection?.RemoteIpAddress != null)
        ip = _httpContextAccessor.HttpContext.Connection.RemoteIpAddress.ToString();

    if (ip.IsNullOrWhitespace())
        ip = GetHeaderValueAs<string>("REMOTE_ADDR");

    // _httpContextAccessor.HttpContext?.Request?.Host this is the local host.

    if (ip.IsNullOrWhitespace())
        throw new Exception("Unable to determine caller's IP.");

    return ip;
}

public T GetHeaderValueAs<T>(string headerName)
{
    StringValues values;

    if (_httpContextAccessor.HttpContext?.Request?.Headers?.TryGetValue(headerName, out values) ?? false)
    {
        string rawValues = values.ToString();   // writes out as Csv when there are multiple.

        if (!rawValues.IsNullOrWhitespace())
            return (T)Convert.ChangeType(values.ToString(), typeof(T));
    }
    return default(T);
}

public static List<string> SplitCsv(this string csvList, bool nullOrWhitespaceInputReturnsNull = false)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(csvList))
        return nullOrWhitespaceInputReturnsNull ? null : new List<string>();

    return csvList
        .TrimEnd(',')
        .Split(',')
        .AsEnumerable<string>()
        .Select(s => s.Trim())
        .ToList();
}

public static bool IsNullOrWhitespace(this string s)
{
    return String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s);
}

Assumes _httpContextAccessor was provided through DI.

  • 2
    THIS is the right answer. There's not a single way to retrieve the IP address, specially when your app is behind a Nginx, a load balancer or something like that. Thanks! – Feu Oct 2 '16 at 2:54
  • @feu kind of, since AspNetCore can override the RemoteIpAddress property with headers like X-Forwarded-For. – Mark Lopez Feb 15 '18 at 22:59
  • @crokusek...trying to adapt your solution, but VS forcing me to the class encapsulating this code static. Do you have this code in your web app project or in a class library in the solution? – dinotom Apr 5 '18 at 17:07
  • The first 2 methods should be in an instance that provides __httpContextAccessor (or adapt it). The second 2 string methods were pulled from a separate static extensions class. – crokusek Apr 5 '18 at 17:22
  • This is a good solution especially when your app uses Kestrel and is hosted with Nginx on Linux. – Timothy Macharia Aug 17 '19 at 14:58
59

In project.json add a dependency to:

"Microsoft.AspNetCore.HttpOverrides": "1.0.0"

In Startup.cs, in the Configure() method add:

  app.UseForwardedHeaders(new ForwardedHeadersOptions
        {
            ForwardedHeaders = ForwardedHeaders.XForwardedFor |
            ForwardedHeaders.XForwardedProto
        });  

And, of course:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.HttpOverrides;

Then, I could get the ip by using:

Request.HttpContext.Connection.RemoteIpAddress

In my case, when debugging in VS I got always IpV6 localhost, but when deployed on an IIS I got always the remote IP.

Some useful links: How do I get client IP address in ASP.NET CORE? and RemoteIpAddress is always null

The ::1 is maybe because of:

Connections termination at IIS, which then forwards to Kestrel, the v.next web server, so connections to the web server are indeed from localhost. (https://stackoverflow.com/a/35442401/5326387)

  • 5
    This is the correct answer, that is also documented on the official documentation about reverse proxies: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/host-and-deploy/… – Melvyn Feb 27 '18 at 20:38
  • 7
    need to point out that the "app.UseForwardedHeaders..." needs to be added before the app.UseAuthentication(); line, in case you use indentity – netfed Apr 6 '18 at 1:09
  • This worked perfectly and I have tested is on locally hosted IIS and on Azure. Works both places. – Thomas Clemensen Apr 27 '18 at 11:30
16

You can use the IHttpConnectionFeature for getting this information.

var remoteIpAddress = httpContext.GetFeature<IHttpConnectionFeature>()?.RemoteIpAddress;
  • Thanks for the answer! – eadam Mar 18 '15 at 1:45
  • 1
    Does it work for Kestrel hosting? In my demo, httpContext.GetFeature<IHttpConnectionFeature>() always be null. – Jerry Bian May 11 '15 at 3:01
  • 1
    @JerryBian according to this doc: github.com/aspnet/Docs/blob/master/aspnet/fundamentals/…, IHttpConnectionFeature is not supported in Kestrel (yet). – qbik Nov 12 '15 at 11:39
  • @JerryBian it is now – David Peden Feb 12 '16 at 21:50
  • Must have been deprecated - @feradz version works for me in RC-1 – fiat May 3 '16 at 0:14
12
var remoteIpAddress = HttpContext.Features.Get<IHttpConnectionFeature>()?.RemoteIpAddress;
  • 6
    Overly complicated. MVC already calls that internally and puts it under HttpContext.Connection.RemoteIpAddress. – Fred Apr 22 '16 at 12:28
  • @Fred - your version returns null for me in RC-1 - IIS and Kestrel – fiat May 3 '16 at 0:15
4

In ASP.NET 2.1, In StartUp.cs Add This Services:

services.AddHttpContextAccessor();
services.TryAddSingleton<IActionContextAccessor, ActionContextAccessor>();

and then do 3 step:

  1. Define a variable in your MVC controller

    private IHttpContextAccessor _accessor;
    
  2. DI into the controller's constructor

    public SomeController(IHttpContextAccessor accessor)
    {
        _accessor = accessor;
    }
    
  3. Retrive the IP Address

    _accessor.HttpContext.Connection.RemoteIpAddress.ToString()
    

This is how it is done.

  • 1
    This gives me ::1. Asp.Net Core 2.2., on localhost. – Stian Oct 2 '19 at 16:46
  • ::1 is localhost in IPv6. The IPv4 equivalent of 127.0.0.1 – Andy Jan 13 at 21:28
2

First, in .Net Core 1.0 Add using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http.Features; to the controller Then inside the relevant method:

var ip = HttpContext.Features.Get<IHttpConnectionFeature>()?.RemoteIpAddress?.ToString();

I read several other answers which failed to compile because it was using a lowercase httpContext, leading the VS to add using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http, instead of the appropriate using, or with HttpContext (compiler is also mislead).

1

In my case, I have DotNet Core 2.2 Web App running on DigitalOcean with docker and nginx as reverse proxy. With this code in Startup.cs I can get the client IP

app.UseForwardedHeaders(new ForwardedHeadersOptions
        {
            ForwardedHeaders = ForwardedHeaders.All,
            RequireHeaderSymmetry = false,
            ForwardLimit = null,
            KnownNetworks = { new IPNetwork(IPAddress.Parse("::ffff:172.17.0.1"), 104) }
        });

::ffff:172.17.0.1 was the ip that I was getting before using

Request.HttpContext.Connection.RemoteIpAddress.ToString();
1

get ipaddress and hostname in .net core

put this code in controller

Follow these Steps:

var addlist = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());
string GetHostName = addlist.HostName.ToString();
string GetIPV6 = addlist.AddressList[0].ToString();
string GetIPV4 = addlist.AddressList[1].ToString();
1

This works for me (DotNetCore 2.1)

[HttpGet]
public string Get() 
{
    var remoteIpAddress = HttpContext.Connection.RemoteIpAddress;
    return remoteIpAddress.ToString();
}

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