11

When I call the code below, I always get result.Succeeded = false

        [HttpPost]
        [AllowAnonymous]
        [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
        public async Task<ActionResult> ResetPassword(ResetPasswordViewModel model)
        {
            if (!ModelState.IsValid)
            {
                return View(model);
            }
            var user = await UserManager.FindByNameAsync(model.Email);
            if (user == null)
            {
                // Don't reveal that the user does not exist
                return RedirectToAction("ResetPasswordConfirmation", "Account");
            }
            string code = await UserManager.GeneratePasswordResetTokenAsync(user.Id);
            var result = await UserManager.ResetPasswordAsync(user.Id, code, model.Password);
            //var result = await UserManager.ResetPasswordAsync(user.Id, model.Code, model.Password);
            if (result.Succeeded)
            {
                return RedirectToAction("ResetPasswordConfirmation", "Account");
            }
            AddErrors(result);
            return View();
        }

The values for user.Id and Password are valid. The result errors always say "Invalid Token" which I don't see as possible since I get it and instantly check it and it errors. This is just a sanity test - I normally send the token via email to the user but that wasn't working either.

UPDATE 1 I define the UserManager in the same controller like this:

    private ApplicationSignInManager _signInManager;
    private ApplicationUserManager _userManager;

    public AccessController()
    {
    }

    public AccessController(ApplicationUserManager userManager, ApplicationSignInManager signInManager)
    {
        UserManager = userManager;
        SignInManager = signInManager;
    }

    public ApplicationSignInManager SignInManager
    {
        get
        {
            return _signInManager ?? HttpContext.GetOwinContext().Get<ApplicationSignInManager>();
        }
        private set
        {
            _signInManager = value;
        }
    }

    public ApplicationUserManager UserManager
    {
        get
        {
            return _userManager ?? HttpContext.GetOwinContext().GetUserManager<ApplicationUserManager>();
        }
        private set
        {
            _userManager = value;
        }
    }

UPDATE 2 Here is my ApplicationUserManager code:

public class ApplicationUserManager : UserManager<ApplicationUser>
{
    public ApplicationUserManager(IUserStore<ApplicationUser> store)
        : base(store)
    {
    }

    public static ApplicationUserManager Create(IdentityFactoryOptions<ApplicationUserManager> options, IOwinContext context) 
    {
        var manager = new ApplicationUserManager(new UserStore<ApplicationUser>(context.Get<ApplicationDbContext>()));
        // Configure validation logic for usernames
        manager.UserValidator = new UserValidator<ApplicationUser>(manager)
        {
            AllowOnlyAlphanumericUserNames = false,
            RequireUniqueEmail = true
        };

        // Configure validation logic for passwords
        manager.PasswordValidator = new PasswordValidator
        {
            RequiredLength = 6,
            RequireNonLetterOrDigit = true,
            RequireDigit = true,
            RequireLowercase = true,
            RequireUppercase = true,
        };

        // Configure user lockout defaults
        manager.UserLockoutEnabledByDefault = true;
        manager.DefaultAccountLockoutTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5);
        manager.MaxFailedAccessAttemptsBeforeLockout = 5;

        // Register two factor authentication providers. This application uses Phone and Emails as a step of receiving a code for verifying the user
        // You can write your own provider and plug it in here.
        manager.RegisterTwoFactorProvider("Phone Code", new PhoneNumberTokenProvider<ApplicationUser>
        {
            MessageFormat = "Your security code is {0}"
        });
        manager.RegisterTwoFactorProvider("Email Code", new EmailTokenProvider<ApplicationUser>
        {
            Subject = "Security Code",
            BodyFormat = "Your security code is {0}"
        });
        manager.EmailService = new EmailService();
        manager.SmsService = new SmsService();
        var dataProtectionProvider = options.DataProtectionProvider;
        if (dataProtectionProvider != null)
        {
            manager.UserTokenProvider = 
                new DataProtectorTokenProvider<ApplicationUser>(dataProtectionProvider.Create("ASP.NET Identity"));
        }
        return manager;
    }
}
  • 1
    How do you create instances of UserManager? Most likely that instance of IDataProtectionProvider is re-created and it should stay the same to validate the code. – trailmax Feb 25 '15 at 22:29
  • Do you have your AntiForgery token set in the form ? Post your form code – Luca Feb 26 '15 at 8:55
  • @Luca If anti-forgery token is invalid, the exception would be earlier than the current problem and the processing would not get to the stage of generating the token. – trailmax Feb 26 '15 at 9:46
  • @EdenMachine That's strange. Can you show the constructor of ApplicationUserManager? or whatever method creates you the instance (ApplicationUserManager.Create in the standard template) – trailmax Feb 26 '15 at 9:47
  • @trailmax ok, thanks - I updated my question with the code you requested to see. – RichC Feb 26 '15 at 15:32
22
+50

This is a long shot, but if your UserManager states that it supports user security stamps then make sure that at the database level the user has a valid security stamp, more specifically, it must not have a NULL stamp.

The reason is that when generating the code, if the stamp comes as null then it is replaced with string.Empty and used in the generated reset code. However, when validating the reset code, the stamp coming from it will be compared directly to what comes from the database so you might end up comparing string.Empty to null and failing the validation as a consequence.

From ASP .NET Identity 2.2 source code for DataProtectorTokenProvider (it was the same in previous version):

// GenerateAsync method
if (manager.SupportsUserSecurityStamp)
{
    stamp = await manager.GetSecurityStampAsync(user.Id);
}
writer.Write(stamp ?? ""); // Written as "" if null


// ValidateAsync method
if (manager.SupportsUserSecurityStamp)
{
    var expectedStamp = await manager.GetSecurityStampAsync(user.Id).WithCurrentCulture();
    return stamp == expectedStamp; // Read as "" but compared directly to null
}
  • Boom! That was it! SecurityStamp was NULL. I put a guid in there and it worked fine. I'm not entirely sure why it was NULL but now that I understand where the problem was, I can use your code above and figure out why it was null and how to fix it going forward. – RichC Feb 26 '15 at 18:23
  • Good spot! Completely missed this option! – trailmax Feb 26 '15 at 19:26
  • My reset tokens were weirdly working on my dev system but not on production server. This fixed it. – damccull Jul 17 '15 at 18:59
  • 1
    My securitystamp is not null but still doesn't work, any other clue of why this happens? Thanks. – kavain Aug 18 '17 at 3:41

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