17

Is there a way to achieve different behaviour of a constexpr function in the compilation phase and at runtime?

Consider the following example (using a theoretical feature from D: static if):

constexpr int pow( int base , int exp ) noexcept
{
    static if( std::evaluated_during_translation() ) {
        auto result = 1;
        for( int i = 0 ; i < exp ; i++ )
            result *= base;
        return result;
    } else { // std::evaluated_during_runtime()
        return std::pow( base , exp );
    }
}

If not, is there a way to restrict constexpr to be compile-time only?

11
  • 2
  • You might have luck with GCC-intrinsic __builtin_constant_p... Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 21:09
  • 5
    this (proof-of-concept) that I just wrote might be of interest, accepted by gcc and msvc, though clang has a bug related to the magic used; let me know and I'll provide it as an answer to your question. Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 23:39
  • 1
    @FilipRoséen-refp so noexcept( constexpr-func ) can determine if something is evaluates during translation/runtime - nice! It took me a while. An answer would be great since you already did alot of work Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 23:59
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    This post seems like a good idea but I'm thinking about whether it can be adopted for functions with parameters... stackoverflow.com/a/55290363/13080413 or in C++17, don't declare you function noexcept, and then do noexcept(func(arg)) -- it'll be true if a constexpr function NOT marked noexcept was executed at compile time
    – Sean
    Commented Aug 21, 2020 at 6:57

2 Answers 2

7

No, there is no such way.

Sorry.

N3583 is a paper proposing changes to allow what you are asking for.

7
  • Just saw this Scott Meyers talk where he also says that one have to use two different functions. Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 21:38
  • This paper is a good answer, unfortunately we have to wait a few years until (if ever) it gets implemented. A type trait would be easy to implement for compiler-writers and would have a minimal impact on the standard. Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 21:47
  • Do you know the status of this proposal? Commented Jun 10, 2015 at 20:30
  • @Serthy No. I spent a few minutes, and didn't see it. isocpp sometimes links to "current proposal status" lists, you can look there. Commented Jun 11, 2015 at 15:39
  • Update: There seem to be different approaches for this now this blog post and this proposal Commented Jan 4, 2018 at 8:22
5

Prior to C++20, this wasn't possible. C++20 then added std::is_constant_evaluated which is exactly for this use case:

constexpr int pow(int base, int exp) noexcept
{
    if (std::is_constant_evaluated())
    {
        auto result = 1;

        for (int i = 0; i < exp; i++)
            result *= base;

        return result;
    } 
    else
    {
        return std::pow(base, exp);
    }
}

Note that the if statement itself is not constexpr. If it were, the whole else arm would be removed from the function and it would always run the if arm, no matter if at compile time or runtime. With a normal if statement, you basically get two functions. One that runs at compile time:

constexpr int pow(int base, int exp) noexcept
{
    auto result = 1;

    for (int i = 0; i < exp; i++)
        result *= base;

    return result;
}

and one that gets compiled an runs at runtime:

constexpr int pow(int base, int exp) noexcept
{
    return std::pow(base, exp);
}

The compiler can safely remove the if arm because it can prove that it isn't reachable at runtime. Pretty neat.

2
  • 1
    Good answer Timo. You might want to make it explicit that "prior to C++20 this wasn't possible". Commented Aug 21, 2020 at 14:04
  • There is now a way in c++23 with consteval, would you mind adding it? Commented Apr 4 at 21:27

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