62

How can I cleanup the workspace in Jenkins? I am using AccuRev as version control tool.

I created freestyle projects in Jenkins.

72

There is a way to cleanup workspace in Jenkins. You can clean up the workspace before build or after build.

First, install Workspace Cleanup Plugin.

To clean up the workspace before build: Under Build Environment, check the box that says Delete workspace before build starts.

To clean up the workspace after the build: Under the heading Post-build Actions select Delete workspace when build is done from the Add Post-build Actions drop down menu.

  • Thanks a lot Nagendra. I am able to fix this issue using workspace cleanup plugin. – Karthik Mar 4 '15 at 6:28
  • 1
    it don't work for pipeline jobs – Mounirsky Jan 22 at 11:10
38

If you want to manually clean it up, for me with my version of jenkins (didn't appear to need an extra plugin installed, but who knows), there is a "workspace" link on the left column, click on your project, then on "workspace", then a "Wipe out current workspace" link appears beneath it on the left hand side column. screenshot

  • 1
    I don’t see that, unfortunately. Sure it is not a plugin? – Joachim Breitner Aug 27 '18 at 22:09
  • 1
    Hmm it seems that the "Workspace Cleanup Plugin" is indeed one of the plugins that is installed "by default." However, after removing it, I still have that link and it seems to still function. So...not sure where it comes from. V2.121.3 – rogerdpack Aug 28 '18 at 19:13
  • This worked but I had to click on the workspace link twice: the first one to go to the "workspace" page, the second time to actually show the "Wipe out current workspace" link. I guess it's an info you can include in the answer. – Gnafu Jan 31 at 9:07
24

Beside above solutions, there is a more "COMMON" way - directly delete the largest space consumer from Linux machine. You can follow the below steps:

  1. Login to Jenkins machine (Putty) enter image description here
  2. cd to the Jenkins installation path

Using ls -lart to list out hidden folder also, normally jenkin installation is placed in .jenkins/ folder

[xxxxx ~]$ ls -lart

drwxrwxr-x 12 xxxx  4096 Feb  8 02:08 .jenkins/
  1. list out the folders spaces

Use df -h to show Disk space in high level

du -sh ./*/ to list out total memory for each subfolder in current path.

du -a /etc/ | sort -n -r | head -n 10 will list top 10 directories eating disk space in /etc/

  1. Delete old build or other large size folder

Normally ./job/ folder or ./workspace/ folder can be the largest folder. Please go inside and delete base on you need (DO NOT delete entire folder).

rm -rf theFolderToDelete

enter image description here

  • 2
    Not sure why voted down. This sounds like a good option for Jenkins admins. Agree not for "read-only" users. – Saikat May 12 '17 at 16:12
  • 1. This doesn't really answer the question asked and 2. my Jenkins server is running on Windows. – mjaggard Jun 7 '17 at 9:15
  • 9
    @mjaggard The question was asked by some one else and he did not mention if it is for Windows only. Also he asked how to cleanup workspace (not limited to frontend/client). Am I missing anything obvious here? – Saikat Jun 8 '17 at 4:22
  • 3
    I totally agree with @takias, it seems a valid answer for the question. And a good one if you have enough permission to do it. – PhoneixS Jul 18 '17 at 14:54
  • 1
    This is an answer to "how do I recover space on a GNU/Linux machine" not jenkins specific. – Felipe Alvarez Jul 27 '18 at 6:31
10

You can run the below script in the Manage JenkinsScripts Console for deleting the workspaces of all the jobs at one shot. We did this to clean up space on the file system.

import hudson.model.*
// For each project
for(item in Hudson.instance.items) {
  // check that job is not building
  if(!item.isBuilding()) {
    println("Wiping out workspace of job "+item.name)
    item.doDoWipeOutWorkspace()
  }
  else {
    println("Skipping job "+item.name+", currently building")
  }
}
  • this does not work for me, it shows java.lang.NullPointerException: Cannot get property 'items' on null object . – Vincent Gerris Nov 28 '17 at 9:33
5

Workspace Cleanup Plugin

In Jenkins file add

cleanWs()

This will delete the workspace after the build is complete

  • 2
    I really appreciate this answer because I had the plugin installed from the other answers but this is what got it to work for my setup. Adding to that, I followed the links to the same plugin in the other answers, but cleanWs() wasn't present on the plugin landing page as syntax to add to my Jenkinsfile. – Arthur Weborg Feb 28 at 22:46
1

You will need to install this plugin before the options mentioned above will appear

Workspace Cleanup Plugin

This plugin add the check box to all job configs to allow you to delete the whole workspace before any steps (inc source control) are run

This is useful to make sure you always start from a known point to guarantee how you build will run

  • 3
    Please add some information that your link is containing. Link-only answer are not what we are looking for at SO! :) – Chilion Feb 26 '15 at 8:26
  • Thanks a lot Keir. It works for me. – Karthik Mar 4 '15 at 6:28
  • 2
    This add's no more information that this answer hasn't already covered. In fact it add's a lot less – Liam Dec 14 '17 at 15:42
1

not allowed to comment, therefore:

The answer from Upen works just fine, but not if you have Jenkins Pipeline Jobs mixed with Freestyle Jobs. There is no such Method as DoWipeWorkspace on Pipeline Jobs. So I modified the Script in order to skip those:

import hudson.model.*
import org.jenkinsci.plugins.workflow.job.WorkflowJob

// For each project
for(item in Hudson.instance.items) {
  // check that job is not building
  if(!item.isBuilding() && !(item instanceof WorkflowJob))
  {
    println("Wiping out workspace of job "+item.name)
    item.doDoWipeOutWorkspace()
  }
  else {
    println("Skipping job "+item.name+", currently building")
  }
}

you could also filter by Job Names if required: item.getDisplayName().toLowerCase().contains("release")

1

IMPORTANT: It is safe to remove the workspace for a given Jenkins job as long as the job is not currently running!

NOTE: I am assuming your $JENKINS_HOME is set to the default: /var/jenkins_home.

Clean up one workspace

rm -rf /var/jenkins_home/workspaces/<workspace>

Clean up all workspaces

rm -rf /var/jenkins_home/workspaces/*

Clean up all workspaces with a few exceptions

This one uses grep to create a whitelist:

ls /var/jenkins_home/workspace \ 
  | grep -v -E '(job-to-skip|another-job-to-skip)$' \
  | xargs -I {} rm -rf /var/jenkins_home/workspace/{}

Clean up 10 largest workspaces

This one uses du and sort to list workspaces in order of largest to smallest. Then, it uses head to grab the first 10:

du -d 1 /var/jenkins_home/workspace \
  | sort -n -r \
  | head -n 10 \
  | xargs -I {} rm -rf /var/jenkins_home/workspace/{}
  • This is dangerous as jobs might be using those workspaces. – aleb May 14 at 9:38
0

Assuming the question is about cleaning the workspace of the current job, you can run:

test -n "$WORKSPACE" && rm -rf $WORKSPACE/*

protected by eyllanesc Apr 14 '18 at 0:01

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.