3

I have an array and my goal is to print the code in a way so it outputs the following:

Output Table

How can i do that?

5
  • 2
    ... what does your array look like? what have tried so far? – ptierno Feb 23 '15 at 22:21
  • So that each and every reader who prepares an answer doesn't have to construct the same object containing input data, please edit to provide it, so they can just copy and paste. For example, arr = [{date: "2014-12-01", from: "Ferdous", subject: "Homework this week"}, {date: "2014-12-01", from: "Dajana", subject: "Keep on coding! :)"}, {date: 2014-12-02, from: "Madonna", subject: "Re: Homework this week"}]. – Cary Swoveland Feb 23 '15 at 22:26
  • 1
    you need to provide some more info on your environment (is it a rails project? is this an ActiveRecord table? etc) and some things about your code (eg a sample of the relevant class) and the attempts you 've made so far. – xlembouras Feb 23 '15 at 22:30
  • 1
    Might take a look at the hirb gem github.com/cldwalker/hirb – Philip Hallstrom Feb 23 '15 at 23:06
  • You really should accept the below answer. It is the right answer! – Jeremie Dec 31 '18 at 5:27
18

I imagine there are lots of gems available for doing this, but if you want to roll-your-own, you could do it like this, in a fairly general way:

Your input is comprised of column labels:

col_labels = { date: "Date", from: "From", subject: "Subject" }

and the data for the rows:

arr = [{date: "2014-12-01", from: "Ferdous", subject: "Homework this week"},
       {date: "2014-12-01", from: "Dajana", subject: "Keep on coding! :)"},
       {date: "2014-12-02", from: "Ariane", subject: "Re: Homework this week"}]

where col_labels and the elements of arr have the same keys.

From this point on, the code is general. First construct a hash @columns (which I've made an instance variable for convenience).

@columns = col_labels.each_with_object({}) { |(col,label),h|
  h[col] = { label: label,
             width: [arr.map { |g| g[col].size }.max, label.size].max } }
  # => {:date=>    {:label=>"Date",    :width=>10},
  #     :from=>    {:label=>"From",    :width=>7},
  #     :subject=> {:label=>"Subject", :width=>22}}

def write_header
  puts "| #{ @columns.map { |_,g| g[:label].ljust(g[:width]) }.join(' | ') } |"
end

def write_divider
  puts "+-#{ @columns.map { |_,g| "-"*g[:width] }.join("-+-") }-+"
end

def write_line(h)
  str = h.keys.map { |k| h[k].ljust(@columns[k][:width]) }.join(" | ")
  puts "| #{str} |"
end

write_divider
write_header
write_divider
arr.each { |h| write_line(h) }
write_divider

+------------+---------+------------------------+
| Date       | From    | Subject                |
+------------+---------+------------------------+
| 2014-12-01 | Ferdous | Homework this week     |
| 2014-12-01 | Dajana  | Keep on coding! :)     |
| 2014-12-02 | Ariane  | Re: Homework this week |
+------------+---------+------------------------+

If you want to reverse the display and make it a bit larger, like yours, first execute:

$_!.reverse
$_@ += 4

Output Table

1
  • Giant answer.. You made Postgresql DB like output ... Congratulations...+1 – Arup Rakshit Feb 24 '15 at 7:02

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