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TL;DR; What are shell scripts? Is it a programming language / is there a programming language we use in shell scripts?


disclaimer: a bit offtopic
So bash stands for Bourne-again shell. A (Unix) Shell is a command line user interface or maybe one could call it an interpreter (?)

So I'm filling out an application for a new job and you get asked for experience of different programming languages and then there is this box at the bottom other experiences - I started typing python 2.7, powershell, bas... Wait! bash isn't a programming language - it's a console that can execute shell scripts... so... eh.... oh my god I have no idea!

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    FWIW, please do include Bash as a programming language skill if you have it. After all, scripting languages are programming languages. Technically however, if you know enough scripting languages, you could list them separately if the document permits. After having had over a dozen Linux-based job interviews over the years, not one interviewer has asked me why I listed Bash as a programming language. If anything, they also wanted to see sed and awk in that list. – Acumenus Oct 29 '16 at 20:06
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We can say that yes, it is a programming language.

According to man bash, Bash is a "sh-compatible command language". Then, we can say a "command language" is "a programming language through which a user communicates with the operating system or an application".

From man bash:

DESCRIPTION

Bash is an sh-compatible command language interpreter that executes commands read from the standard input or from a file. Bash also incorporates useful features from the Korn and C shells (ksh and csh).

http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/

Bash is the GNU Project's shell. Bash is the Bourne Again SHell. Bash is an sh-compatible shell that incorporates useful features from the Korn shell (ksh) and C shell (csh). It is intended to conform to the IEEE POSIX P1003.2/ISO 9945.2 Shell and Tools standard. It offers functional improvements over sh for both programming and interactive use. In addition, most sh scripts can be run by Bash without modification.

And a UNIX shell is... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_shell

A Unix shell is a command-line interpreter or shell that provides a traditional user interface for the Unix operating system and for Unix-like systems. Users direct the operation of the computer by entering commands as text for a command line interpreter to execute, or by creating text scripts of one or more such commands. Users typically interact with a Unix shell using a terminal emulator, however, direct operation via serial hardware connections, or networking session, are common for server systems.

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    So bash is a language - but it is also a shell.. ? This is confusing, isn't it? – boop Feb 24 '15 at 10:53
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    @Brettetete you can also start Python in interactive mode and it behaves like a shell. Or JavaScript, or Ruby or any script language. – Sascha Wolf Feb 24 '15 at 10:53
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    @Zeeker ohhhh... the penny has dropped. That makes a lot of sense – boop Feb 24 '15 at 10:55
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    @Brettetete regarding your final goal, I would definitely write "bash" in your cv. I do it, also with "awk". – fedorqui 'SO stop harming' Feb 24 '15 at 11:00
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    The bit you left off the first quote (emphasis mine): "It offers functional improvements over sh for both programming and interactive use." – Paul Evans Feb 24 '15 at 11:05
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Bash most certainly is a programming language, one that specialises in the unix/linux shell scripting. It's turing complete so you could (theoretically) write any program in Bash.

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    Agreed - it is all semantics that resolve around how you define programming language. Does it have specializes syntax, data handling/structures, test constructs, I/O routines, etc... – David C. Rankin Feb 24 '15 at 10:57
  • It is not a programming language, it is a scripting language just like batch is – user4453924 Feb 24 '15 at 10:57
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    Qualified in the "it is all semantics that resolve around how you define programming language" Yes it is a shell, but associated with that shell is a set of rules and syntax that allow you to interact with the shell. man bash contains most. So, yes it is a shell, and yes it is a programming language designed to allow interaction with that shell. – David C. Rankin Feb 24 '15 at 11:00
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    It's not worth this perfunctory level of debate. The question was will I get in trouble listing BASH as a programming language skill on a job application. If the employer wants to delve into the semantics that's fine, but I don't think any employer could ding you for listing it. In answer to your comment - sure -- how do you think all the c-like languages began. – David C. Rankin Feb 24 '15 at 11:32
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    It's also not that hard to write proper "programs" in bash. Kubernetes and git both use large amounts of bash for example. I personally have solved regular whiteboarding problems in bash as welll.. – CoffeeTableEspresso Jan 24 '20 at 23:19
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There is no perfect definition of what a programming language really is but you can say that every language that is Turing-complete is a programming language in the sense of that every thinkable program can theoretically be written in it (even if it may be awkward to do so and even if it would be horribly slow to run). And Bash is Turing-complete, so there is nothing that could not be programmed in Bash.

The problem with Bash, shells in general is, that it lacks a lot of base functionality, thus when writing scripts for them, you often in fact call external programs to perform the desired work. But that's only taking a shortcut. E.g. if you'd need floating point functionality in a shell, you could actually implement it. It would be possible to write a full IEEE 754 standard implementation in everything that is Turing-complete. In practice such an implementation would be huge, require tons of memory and be horribly slow, so one better calls bc for that. But even implementing bc entirely in bash would be possible.

Here's a bash script I've once written that draws a Mandelbrot set to console. You better be prepared to get some cups of coffee if you want to see the final result, it's going to be a very long night:

#!/bin/bash

BAILOUT=16
MAX_ITERATIONS=1000

function iterate {
    # $1 is x
    # $2 is y
    local zi=0
    local zr=0
    local i=0

    local cr
    cr=$(printf "%s\n" "scale=16; $2 - 0.5" | bc)

    while true
    do
        local temp
        local zr2
        local zi2
        i=$((i + 1))
        zr2=$(printf "%s\n" "scale=16; ($zr * $zr) - ($zi * $zi) + $cr" | bc)
        zi2=$(printf "%s\n" "scale=16; (($zr * $zi) * 2) + $1" | bc)
        temp=$(printf "%s\n" "(($zi * $zi) + ($zr * $zr)) > $BAILOUT" | bc)

        if ((temp == 1))
        then
            return "$i"
        fi

        if ((i > MAX_ITERATIONS))
        then
            return 0
        fi

        zr="$zr2"
        zi="$zi2"
    done
}

function mandelbrot {
    local y
    for ((y = -39; y < 39; y++))
    do
        printf "\n"
        local x
        for ((x = -39; x < 39; x++))
        do
            local xi
            local yi
            local ires
            xi=$(printf "%s\n" "scale=16; $x / 40.0" | bc)
            yi=$(printf "%s\n" "scale=16; $y / 40.0" | bc)
            iterate "$xi" "$yi"
            ires=$?

            if ((ires == 0))
            then
                printf "*"
            else
                printf " "
            fi
        done
    done
    printf "\n"
}

mandelbrot

For those who cannot wait that long, the result should look like this:

                                       *                                      
                                       *                                      
                                       *                                      
                                       *                                      
                                       *                                      
                                      ***                                     
                                     *****                                    
                                     *****                                    
                                      ***                                     
                                       *                                      
                                   *********                                  
                                 *************                                
                                ***************                               
                             *********************                            
                             *********************                            
                              *******************                             
                              *******************                             
                              *******************                             
                              *******************                             
                            ***********************                           
                              *******************                             
                              *******************                             
                             *********************                            
                              *******************                             
                              *******************                             
                               *****************                              
                                ***************                               
                                 *************                                
                                   *********                                  
                                       *                                      
                                ***************                               
                            ***********************                           
                         * ************************* *                        
                         *****************************                        
                      * ******************************* *                     
                       *********************************                      
                      ***********************************                     
                    ***************************************                   
               *** ***************************************** ***              
               *************************************************              
                ***********************************************               
                 *********************************************                
                 *********************************************                
                ***********************************************               
                ***********************************************               
              ***************************************************             
               *************************************************              
               *************************************************              
              ***************************************************             
              ***************************************************             
         *    ***************************************************    *        
       *****  ***************************************************  *****      
       ****** *************************************************** ******      
      ******* *************************************************** *******     
    ***********************************************************************   
    ********* *************************************************** *********   
       ****** *************************************************** ******      
       *****  ***************************************************  *****      
              ***************************************************             
              ***************************************************             
              ***************************************************             
              ***************************************************             
               *************************************************              
               *************************************************              
              ***************************************************             
                ***********************************************               
                ***********************************************               
                  *******************************************                 
                   *****************************************                  
                 *********************************************                
                **** ****************** ****************** ****               
                 ***  ****************   ****************  ***                
                  *    **************     **************    *                 
                         ***********       ***********                        
                         **  *****           *****  **                        
                          *   *                 *   *      

It shall resemble this kind kind of thing turned by 90 degree (and a bit squeezed):

Mandelbrot set

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My two cents

Comming on this SO question something late, reading fedorqui's answer, I think "programming language" is not exactly same thing than "command language", meaning a language intented to run commands.

About turing consideration, yes, you could... I personally wrote a lot of libraries around (around monitoring, backups, sysadmin, networking, etc.), but clearly for writting a program, you have to use a real programming language.

However

is a shell (like and others )! Meaning an overall aggregator language, or a super language.

First goal is to be an interactive command processor, in order to use and maintain systems.

One of his firsts applications was to create s in order to prepare environment for running programs written in other languages.

So this command proccessor is ideal for systems, filesystems, networks and a lot of administation tasks, because it's interactive and using his history make creating script job just easy.

His real power

As this language is intended to deal with s, s, s and because said everything is a file, a script could normally deal with others tools/binaries/application while running!

This could open a lot of interactivity between systems, networks, iot, etc...

A script could for sample (see further my shell connector demo).

1. Open DB, SSH connection and log file simultaneously as file descriptors.
2. Create SQL (temporary or not) table
3. Doing loop, checking for event on DB, SSH connection or else...
4. Interact with DB and/or SSH...
5. Close all file descriptors (DB, SSH, log file, etc)

Mandelbrot sample:

Comments on Mecki's anwers show a good sample of how could be used to deal with other binaries (bc for Mandelbrot)....

  • If script do one fork for each calcul, this script will take many hours to draw a Mandelbrot on 80 columns terminal.
  • 1st improvement: running only one background fork to bc -l to submit all calculs, drop down execution time to 8 minutes.
  • 2nd improvement: passing iterate loop (upto 2000 tests) to bc, drop own execution time to 8 secondes.
  • 3nd improvement: creating more background bc for computing many dot simultaneously, in order to use multi-core, dividing execution time approximatively than available cores... (Thanks to Léa Gris for contributing, helping making this compatible, multi-core idea and adding colors, making this near beautiful, I can't resist to post his result) Colored Mandelbrot in terminal

More sample

I wrote some scripts showing this powerfull parallelisation capabilities:

  • multiping.sh will run many ping simultaneously and draw a dynamic graphic using gnuplot, while staying interactive.
  • shell_connector.sh is a library if sourced but contain a full demo using sqlite, date and bc as background co-process if run.

In order to do some monitoring, checks against differences or so one, we could create a script to open many simultaneous connections to many differents targets, using one of netcat, sql-client, ftp, open-ssl s_client, ssh or else...

... with the ability of running sha1sum, grep, xmlint or bc (if not already backgrounded) when required, while connections stays open...

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