14

I'd like, for example, block every IP from base 89.95 (89.95..). I don't have .htaccess files on my server, so I'll have to do it with PHP.

if ($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] == "89.95.25.37") die();

Would block specific IP. How can I block entire IP blocks?

8 Answers 8

19

Try strpos()

if(strpos($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], "89.95") === 0)
{
    die();
}

If you notice, the === operator makes sure that the 89.95 is at the beginning of the IP address. This means that you can specify as much of the IP address as you want, and it will block no matter what numbers come after it.

For instance, all of these will be blocked:

89.95 -> 89.95.12.34, 89.95.1234.1, 89.95.1.1
89.95.6 -> 89.95.65.34, 89.95.61.1, 89.95.6987

(some of those aren't valid IP addresses though)

4
  • hehe, i'm surprised that strpos here works faster than substr
    – zerkms
    May 19, 2010 at 22:42
  • @zerkms it shouldn't really be surprising - strpos can return immediately if the test fails, and does not have to do any string copying or allocation. Also, I just wanted to note that the behaviour changes if you switch === for ==, so don't do that. Use three equal signs.
    – gnud
    May 19, 2010 at 23:09
  • @gnud: for long strings strpos would be slower, just because it should iterate over the whole string to search the needle. and i know what is the difference of === and ==.
    – zerkms
    May 19, 2010 at 23:29
  • @zerkms Yes, the == vs === was meant as a separate note to complement the answer, not aimed at you :=)
    – gnud
    May 19, 2010 at 23:35
5

Use ip2long() to convert dotted decimal to a real IP address. Then you can do ranges easily.

Just do ip2long() on the high and low range to get the value, then use those as constants in your code.

If you're familiar with subnet masking, you can do it like this:

// Deny 10.12.*.*
$network = ip2long("10.12.0.0");
$mask = ip2long("255.255.0.0");
$ip = ip2long($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);
if (($network & $mask) == ($ip & $mask)) {
  die("Unauthorized");
}

Or if you're familiar with this format 10.12.0.0/16:

// Deny 10.12.*.*
$network = ip2long("10.12.0.0");
$prefix = 16;
$ip = ip2long($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);
if ($network >> (32 - $prefix)) == ($ip >> (32 - $prefix)) {
  die("Unauthorized");
}

You can turn these into functions and have very manageable code, making it easy to add IP addresses and customize the ranges.

3
  • Thanks! This is how we're doing it.
    – Ami
    May 22, 2012 at 12:46
  • Investigating just $_SERVER{'REMOTE_HOST'} would be enough? Because maybe the user uses a proxy. So there is some other parameters that you have to check, like REMOTE_ADDR or these. Am I right? or doing what I linked isn't useful?
    – stack
    Jun 30, 2016 at 23:25
  • Yes, just use REMOTE_ADDR. Jul 1, 2016 at 2:17
3

Convert the dotted quad to an integer:

$ip = sprintf('%u', ip2long($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']));

// only allow 10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255
if (!($ip >= 167772160 && $ip <=  184549375)) {
    die('Forbidden.');
}
11
  • what is the reason of using integers here? making code more obfuscated?
    – zerkms
    May 19, 2010 at 22:32
  • Not that this diminishes the usefulness of this answer, but Authorization sounds more of a Opt-In word, where a select group of people are authorized. In this case, instead of only authorizing a few people, he unauthorizes, or forbids a few people. As such, I would think a better word would be 'Forbidden'. May 19, 2010 at 22:34
  • @webbiedave: lol. again: what is the reason of using integers here?
    – zerkms
    May 19, 2010 at 22:37
  • 1
    @zerkms, how else will you handle a class A or B range? You will be writing a lot of code if you keep the IP address in dotted decimal format. May 19, 2010 at 22:40
  • 1
    @zerkms, the question reads "How can I block entire IP blocks?" May 20, 2010 at 12:13
1

Make a substring :) For example for blocking 89.95.25.* you make a substring of the IP, cutting off the last two numbers and compare it to "89.95.25."

1
$user_ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; // get user ip

$denyIPs = array("111.111.111", "222.222.222", "333.333.333");
if (in_array ($user_ip, $denyIPs)) {
   // blocked ip
}
else {
   // not blocked
}
0
1

This has always worked very well for me: This checks for the proper server variables and compares it against a list of known IPs.. and yes, PHP does understand wildcards, so using * within the IP with assist in blocking ranges of IPs.

// The blacklisted ips.
$denied_ips = array(
'1.2.3.4',
'2.3.*',
);

// The function to get the visitor's IP.
function getUserIP(){
    //check ip from share internet
    if (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'])){
      $ip=$_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'];
    }
    //to check ip is pass from proxy
    elseif (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'])){
      $ip=$_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'];
    } else {
      $ip=$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
    }
    return $ip;
}
//The user
$visitorIp = getUserIP();

// Now let's search if this IP is blackliated
$status = array_search($visitorIp, $denied_ips);

// Let's check if $status has a true OR false value.
if($status !== false){
    echo '<div class="error">Your IP has been banned! Stop spamming us!</div>';
    // header("Location: http://zombo.com");
    // exit; 
}

There's also a great article at Perishable Press: http://perishablepress.com/how-to-block-ip-addresses-with-php/

1
  • 1
    "and yes, PHP does understand wildcards, so using * within the IP with assist in blocking ranges of IPs." are you sure about that? specific version of php maybe? Apr 12, 2013 at 23:02
0

using revive's code, use this to get wildcard search working

// Now let's search if this IP is blackliated
$status = false;
foreach($denied_ips as $val)
{
    if (strpos($val,'*') !== false)
    {
        if(strpos($visitorIp, array_shift(explode("*", $val))) === 0)
        {
            $status = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if(strcmp($visitorIp, $val) === 0)
        {
            $status = true;
            break;
        }
    }
}
-1
$deny = array("111.111.111", "222.222.222", "333.333.333");

if (in_array($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], $deny)) {
    header("location:http://www.google.com/");
    exit();
}

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