6

Here I made a code for writing ASCII characters into VGA Memory:

.global _put_in_mem
_put_in_mem:
push bp
mov bp, sp
mov cx, [bp + 4]
mov si, [bp + 6]
mov bx, 0xb800
mov ds, bx
mov [si], cx
add bx, 0x1
mov cx, 0x7
mov [si], cx
pop bp
ret

This is called through a kernel.c file shown below:

void main()
{
 extern void put_in_mem();
 char c = 'e';
 put_in_mem(c, 0xA0);
}

The above code was meant to print "e" on the beginning of the second line in QEmu, but it did not. I tried to debug this using GDB and found that the command

mov bx, 0xb800

in GDB has become

mov    -0x4800,%bx

and the value in ebx after this command is 0x0.
Why has the value not loaded in the bx register?

Further, I thought that the move instructions use ds register as their segment base and offset all the addresses from the contents of ds. So according to this reasoning, I assumed that when

mov [si], cx

instruction the contents of cx register will be placed at the address 0xb8a0. Is this correct? Can mov instruction be affected by any other segement registers (like cs, es etc.) as well?

  • 4
    It is just a wonky debugger problem, it displays the value as though it was a signed number. It isn't, 0xb800 is an unsigned number. Why it is 0 after it executes is unguessable. Maybe you didn't execute it yet, maybe you should not be looking at a 32-bit register in a 16-bit program. – Hans Passant Feb 24 '15 at 15:45
  • 1
    0xb800 == -0x4800 in 16-bit sense. – Jason Hu Feb 24 '15 at 15:47
  • ok...but why is it not getting into the register – sarthak Feb 24 '15 at 15:50
  • 1
    Make sure it isn't a memory reference accidentally. Since your gdb output seems like at&t, it would normally show a $ for immediates. As such, it's suspicious that what you really have is loading bx with the content of memory at address 0xb800. Can you check the machine code? – Jester Feb 24 '15 at 15:52
  • "it did not" So what did it put at the second line, or at the wrong place, etc? – Weather Vane Feb 24 '15 at 15:53
4

There are a couple of problems with the routine _put_in_mem, it doesn't preserve registers DS and SI which must be preserved according to 16-bit x86 calling conventions, see section 6 of this document, and it doesn't store the character and attribute bytes properly.

.global _put_in_mem
_put_in_mem:
push bp
mov bp, sp
mov cx, [bp + 4]
mov si, [bp + 6]   # si must be preserved across function calls
mov bx, 0xb800
mov ds, bx         # ds must be preserved across function calls
mov [si], cx
add bx, 0x1
mov cx, 0x7        # low byte 0x7, upper byte = character = 0x00
mov [si], cx       # si has not changed... overwriting with 0x0007
pop bp
ret

Here's one way to fix it:

.global _put_in_mem
_put_in_mem:
push bp
mov bp, sp
mov cx, [bp + 4]   # cx = xxcc, where cc is ASCII character
mov ch, 0x7        # attribute byte: light-grey on black
mov bx, [bp + 6]   # bx = offset into VGA video buffer
mov ax, 0xb800     # VGA video buffer base at 0xb800 x 16
mov es, ax         # use ES segment register instead of DS
mov es:[bx], cx    # store ASCII at es:[bx], attribute at es:[bx+1]
pop bp
ret

The VGA attribute byte follows the character byte in text mode. An attribute of 0x7 means to display as light-grey on black background... see http://wiki.osdev.org/Printing_To_Screen and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA-compatible_text_mode

  • You modify the ds segment register as well as the si register. These registers should be preserved across function calls. Use es:[bx] to avoid having to save and restore ds and si – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Feb 24 '15 at 16:13
  • Thanks... That add command should be add si, 0x1..but other than that why are we using es instead of ds segment. And why did move [si], cx didn't work – sarthak Feb 24 '15 at 16:44
  • 2
    @sarthak As chqrlie pointed out, the function as originally written modified DS segment register and SI general purpose register - those must be preserved by the callee according to 16-bit x86 calling conventions, see section 6 of agner.org/optimize/calling_conventions.pdf. The reason mov [si],cx wouldn't work even if you increment SI is because it has an implied operand size of 16 bits (one word) and x86 supports unaligned stores so it will store the attribute but trash the next character (then offset SI+1). – amdn Feb 24 '15 at 16:55
  • @amdn es:[bx] syntax doesn't work with as86. Do you know the syntax for it?? – sarthak Feb 24 '15 at 17:45
  • @sarthak I haven't used as86, but according to this linuxmisc.com/16-linux-development/d1a164fce061567c.htm you'll need to specify the segment override in a separate line eseg, then follow that with the store mov [bx],cx ... not sure really. – amdn Feb 24 '15 at 17:50
3

Make sure it isn't a memory reference accidentally. Since your gdb output seems like at&t, it would normally show a $ for immediates. As such, it's suspicious that what you really have is loading bx with the content of memory at address 0xb800. Can you check the machine code?

The machine code is 0xb8001e8b

Indeed, that's machine code for loading from memory. Looking at the as86 manual, you can see:

#      Prefix for immediate operands.
       mov ax,#1234
       Immediate value, ax becomes 1234.

As such, you should prefix your immediates with a # sign. Note this applies to all immediates.

While this fixes the problem you asked about, see @amdn's answer for other issues you have.

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