40

I'm using flexbox to align my child elements. What I'd like to do is center one element and leave the other aligned to the very left. Normally I would just set the left element using margin-right: auto. The problem is that pushes the center element off center. Is this possible without using absolute positioning?

HTML & CSS

#parent {
  align-items: center;
  border: 1px solid black;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  margin: 0 auto;
  width: 500px;
}
#left {
  margin-right: auto;
}
#center {
  margin: auto;
}
<div id="parent">
  <span id="left">Left</span>
  <span id="center">Center</span>
</div>

  • 1
    Check this site for reference to flexbox: css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox – Zefiryn Feb 24 '15 at 16:18
  • 2
    I didn't see anything there that addressed my issue. – Carl Edwards Feb 24 '15 at 16:20
  • I put this link as a reference for most accurate and thorough description of flexbox. If you can't find an answer there then it may not be possible. One thing you may try without absolute positioning is to use two containers. One will align first button to the left, the second will align to the center. Then push second up with negative top margin. – Zefiryn Feb 24 '15 at 16:26
  • Yes, it's possible without absolute positioning. Create a third element in the HTML (#right). Make it identical to #left, except on the other end of the container. Apply the following CSS to #right: visibility: hidden and margin-left: auto. Now the margin-right: auto on #left will work as desired. More details here: stackoverflow.com/q/35250367/3597276 – Michael_B May 13 '16 at 2:43
20

EDIT: See Solo's answer below, it is the better solution.


The idea behind flexbox is to provide a framework for easily aligning elements with variable dimensions within a container. As such, it makes little sense to provide a layout where the width of one element is totally ignored. In essence, that is exactly what absolute positioning is for, as it takes the element out of the normal flow.

As far as I know, there is no nice way of doing this without using position: absolute;, so I would suggest using it... but If you REALLY don't want to, or can't use absolute positioning then I suppose you could use one of the following workarounds.


If you know the exact width of the "Left" div, then you could change justify-content to flex-start (left) and then align the "Center" div like this:

#center {
    position: relative;
    margin: auto;
    left: -{half width of left div}px;
}

If you do not know the width, then you could duplicate "Left" on the right side, use justify-content: space-between;, and hide the new right element: Just to be clear, this is really, really ugly... better to use absolute positioning than to duplicate content. :-)

#parent {
  align-items: center;
  border: 1px solid black;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: space-between;
  margin: 0 auto;
  width: 500px;
}
#right {
    opacity: 0;
}
<div id="parent">
  <span id="left">Left</span>
  <span id="center">Center</span>
  <span id="right">Left</span>
</div>

  • 4
    I can't agree that the second method is "uglier". It's actually better than the first since Flexbox children won't overlap when there is not enough of horizontal space. – TranslucentCloud Jan 26 '17 at 8:12
53

Add third empty element:

<div class="parent">
  <div class="left">Left</div>
  <div class="center">Center</div>
  <div class="right"></div>
</div>

And the following style:

.parent {
  display: flex;
}
.left, .right {
  flex: 1;
}

Only left and right are set to grow and thanks to the facts that...

  • there are only two growing elements (doesn't matter if empty) and
  • that both get same widths (they'll evenly distribute the available space)

...center element will always be perfectly centered.

This is much better than accepted answer in my opinion because you do not have to copy left content to right and hide it to get same width for both sides, it just magically happens (flexbox is magical).


In action:

.parent {
  display: flex;
}

.left,
.right {
  flex: 1;
}


/* Styles for demonstration */
.parent {
  padding: 5px;
  border: 2px solid #000;
}
.left,
.right {
  padding: 3px;
  border: 2px solid red;
}
.center {
  margin: 0 3px;
  padding: 3px;
  border: 2px solid blue;
}
<div class="parent">
  <div class="left">Left</div>
  <div class="center">Center</div>
  <div class="right"></div>
</div>

  • Thank you, this is exactly what I needed to make a modal window's title bar. – Domino Jul 11 '17 at 17:19
  • 9
    You can also use a pseudo-element of the parent instead of an empty element, e.g. .parent::after{content: ''; flex: 1} – Smasty Aug 26 '17 at 13:36
  • This is the neatest way! Thank you. – Soli Jan 3 '18 at 8:34
  • How can I use this method to do the opposite? I.e. Center one item, and put another item on the right? – Benisburgers Nov 13 '18 at 11:30
  • @Benisburgers Just put your content to div with class right and leave div with class left empty. – Solo Nov 13 '18 at 11:41
1

Try this no hacks :)

CSS

.container{
  width: 500px;
  margin: 0 auto;
}
.box{
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;/* just in case*/
  justify-content: space-between;
}
.box p:nth-child(2){
  text-align: center;
  background-color: lime;
  flex: 1 1 0px;
}

HTML

<div class="container">
  <div class="box">
    <p>One</p>
    <p>Two</p>
  </div>
</div>

http://codepen.io/whisher/pen/XpGaEZ

  • This only centers within the remaining space. It's not true center – richardm Mar 7 '17 at 20:32
1

I have another solution. In my opinion, Adding an empty block to the center element is fine but code-wise it bit ugly. My solution for this is below

    <div id="parent">
      <span id="left">Left</span>
      <span id="center">Center</span>
    </div>

   #parent {
      display: flex;    
   }

   #left {
      flex:1;
   } 

   #center {
      flex:1;
   } 

   #parent:after {
      flex:1;
   }
0

If you don't want to rely on positioning, the only way I've found that makes it truly centered is to use a combination of auto margin and negative margin prevent the centered element to getting pushed over by the left aligned element. This requires that you know the exact width of the left aligned element though.

.container {
  height: 100px;
  border: solid 10px skyblue;
  
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
}

.block {
  width: 120px;
  background: tomato;
}

.justify-start {
  margin-right: auto;
}

.justify-center {
  margin-right: auto;
  margin-left: -120px;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="block justify-start"></div>
  <div class="block justify-center"></div>
</div>

0

Since this is 4 years old I figured I'd update this with a much easier CSS Grid solution.

#parent {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(3, 1fr);
  border: 1px solid black;
  margin: 0 auto;
  width: 500px;
}
#center {
  text-align: center;
}
<div id="parent">
  <span id="left">Left</span>
  <span id="center">Center</span>
</div>

-1

As far as I know this is possible with the following code.

https://jsfiddle.net/u5gonp0a/

.box {
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
    background-color: green;
    text-align: left;
}

.left {
    padding: 10px;
    background-color: pink;
}

.center {
    padding: 10px;
    background-color: yellow;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
<div class="box">
    <div class="left">left</div>
    <div class="center">center</div>
</div>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.