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I have a persistent map that uses byte[] as the key. Access is via an iterator that takes an arbitrary comparator. As the byte arrays represent signed numeric values (integer or decimal) I would like to sort the byte[] numerically, such that the number following 1 is 2, and not 11.

The array is encoded from the string representation of the number using UTF8.

I have been looking for solid, threadsafe code to do this, something like the Guava comparator SignedBytes.lexicographicalComparator, but for numeric sorting.

Does such a thing exist somewhere?

If not, is there a fast and reliable way to do this?

To make the use-case a bit clearer: I'm using a Java port of Leveldb. Leveldb stores keys and values as byte[]. It supports range queries over keys, but the default comparator is Lexicographical, so it produces poor range query results when the values represent numbers.

I would prefer not to convert back to String and then to Int (or Double), because the compare method will be called billions of times.

  • Have you considered using TreeMap? – Michael Krause Feb 24 '15 at 18:19
  • If the byte arrays are the UTF-8 encodings of the string representations of your numbers, you might honestly have no better alternative than converting them back to strings and parsing them. – Louis Wasserman Feb 24 '15 at 18:19
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    bytes don't have encoding. If the bytes contain signed numeric values, you should transform the byte array to this signed numeric value, and use this signed numeric value as the key, instead of using a byte array. – JB Nizet Feb 24 '15 at 18:21
  • As @LouisWasserman inferred, the byte arrays are the UTF-8 encodings of string representations of numbers. – L. Blanc Feb 24 '15 at 18:41
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    @MichaelKrause I can't use a TreeMap, the "persistent map" I mentioned is actually the java API of a key value store. I have no way to change it. In any case, TreeMap would through an exception if I tried to sort byte[] directly, without passing it a byte[] comparator. – L. Blanc Feb 24 '15 at 18:43
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It seems to me that you just want to use a sorted map. Java has several (ConcurrentSkipListMap and TreeMap being the big two). The question seems a little vague, particularly with regard to the thread-safe point (do you someone to be able to concurrently write, read-and-write with the iterable updating, etc?). If you only need to concurrently write to the map, I wouldn't waste my time on something like ConcurrentSkipListMap or a wrapper like java.util.Collections.synchronizedMap(java.util.Map) and would simply do a synchronized block where you need it in the method(s) that writes.

If you write a lot and only need to grab an iterator occasionally, try using a regular HashMap and then the method that you have that returns the iterator can simply make a new SortedMap, using the comparator, and push the data into the new map, but this is expensive, so would only be done if you really don't read often, don't have that much data, and can stand the wait on that read operation. Even then it's not an incredibly expensive action.

It really seems to me that you want a Comparable that does this? The Comparable is what determines if 11 or 2 comes first. Since it's a byte array, you'd have something like this (please note that I haven't tested this and I assume you are using big endian):

class NumberComparator implements Comparator<byte[]> {
    /*
     * (non-Javadoc)
     * 
     * @see java.util.Comparator#compare(java.lang.Object, java.lang.Object)
     */
    @Override
    public int compare(byte[] o1, byte[] o2) {
        if (o1 == null) {
            if (o2 == null)
                return 0;
            return -1;
        }

        if (o2 == null)
            return 1;

        // I'm going to cheat and assume that if the lengths aren't the same, you didn't pad... but really, the
        // lengths should always be the same because you shouldn't allow pushing doubles and ints
        if (o1.length != o2.length) {
            return o1.length - o2.length;
        }
        if (o1.length == 0)
            return 0;

        // For the sake of things, I'm assuming you've taken care of endianness and that we're using big-endian
        // We're an int (note that you can make the size of an int a constant)
        if (o1.length == Integer.SIZE >> 3) {
            int o1Integer = 0;
            int o2Integer = 0;

            int shift = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < o1.length; i++) {
                o1Integer |= ((o1[i] & 0xFF) << shift);
                o2Integer |= ((o2[i] & 0xFF) << shift);
                shift += 0x8;
            }

            return Integer.compare(o1Integer, o2Integer);
        }
        // We're a double (note that you can make the size of a double a constant)
        else if (o1.length == Double.SIZE >> 3) {
            long o1Bits = 0L;
            long o2Bits = 0L;

            int shift = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < o1.length; i++) {
                o1Bits |= ((o1[i] & 0xFFL) << shift);
                o2Bits |= ((o2[i] & 0xFFL) << shift);
            }

            return Double.compare(Double.longBitsToDouble(o1Bits), Double.longBitsToDouble(o2Bits));
        }

        // Who knows what we are...but again, we're assuming big-endian
        final boolean o1Neg = ((o1[0] & 0x80) == 0) ? false : true;
        final boolean o2Neg = ((o2[0] & 0x80) == 0) ? false : true;
        // o1 is negative and o2 is positive
        if (o1Neg && !o2Neg)
            return -1;
        // o1 is positive and o2 is negative
        if (!o1Neg && o2Neg)
            return 1;

        // o1 is positive and o2 is positive
        if (!o1Neg && !o2Neg)
            for (int pos = 0; pos < o1.length; pos++) {
                int comp = (o1[pos] & 0xFF) - (o2[pos] & 0xFF);
                if (comp != 0)
                    return comp;
            }
        // TODO I leave handling if both are negatives to the reader

        // Everything was the same!  We are equal :-)
        return 0;
    }
}

Edit

Okay, after that bit of clarification, your comparator should be more like:

class NumberStringComparator implements Comparator<byte[]> {
    private static final Pattern leftZeroPadding = Pattern.compile("^[\\-\\+]?0+");
    private static final Pattern rightZeroPadding=Pattern.compile("0+$");

    /*
     * (non-Javadoc)
     * 
     * @see java.util.Comparator#compare(java.lang.Object, java.lang.Object)
     */
    @Override
    public int compare(byte[] o1, byte[] o2) {
        if (o1 == null) {
            if (o2 == null)
                return 0;
            return -1;
        }

        if (o2 == null)
            return 1;

        String o1String = new String(o1, "UTF-8").trim();
        String o2String = new String(o2, "UTF-8").trim();

        final boolean o1Neg = o1String.charAt(0) == '-';
        final boolean o2Neg = o2String.charAt(0) == '-';
        // o1 is negative and o2 is positive
        if (o1Neg && !o2Neg)
            return -1;
        // o1 is positive and o2 is negative
        if (!o1Neg && o2Neg)
            return 1;

        String o1WithoutZeroPadding = leftZeroPadding.matcher(o1String).replaceAll("");
        String o2WithoutZeroPadding = leftZeroPadding.matcher(o2String).replaceAll("");
        // We're the same thing
        if (o1WithoutZeroPadding.equals(o2WithoutZeroPadding))
            return 0;

        int o1Dec = o1WithoutZeroPadding.indexOf('.');
        int o2Dec = o2WithoutZeroPadding.indexOf('.');

        final int o1LeftLength;
        final int o2LeftLength;
        final String o1Left;
        final String o2Left;
        final String o1Right;
        final String o2Right;

        if (o1Dec == -1) {
            o1LeftLength = o1WithoutZeroPadding.length();
            o1Left = o1WithoutZeroPadding;
            o1Right = "";
        } else {
            o1LeftLength = o1Dec;
            if (o1LeftLength == 0)
                o1Left = "";
            else
                o1Left = o1WithoutZeroPadding.substring(0, o1Dec);
            if (o1Dec + 1 == o1LeftLength) {
                o1Right = "";
            } else {
                o1Right = rightZeroPadding.matcher(o1WithoutZeroPadding.substring(o1Dec + 1)).replaceAll("");
            }
        }
        if (o2Dec == -1) {
            o2LeftLength = o2WithoutZeroPadding.length();
            o2Left = o2WithoutZeroPadding;
            o2Right = "";
        } else {
            o2LeftLength = o2Dec;
            if (o2LeftLength == 0)
                o2Left = "";
            else
                o2Left = o2WithoutZeroPadding.substring(0, o2Dec);
            if (o2Dec + 1 == o2LeftLength) {
                o2Right = "";
            } else {
                o2Right = rightZeroPadding.matcher(o2WithoutZeroPadding.substring(o2Dec + 1)).replaceAll("");
            }
        }

        // If o1 is shorter than o2 (left of the decimal)...
        if (o1LeftLength < o2LeftLength) {
            // and we're negative numbers...
            if (o1Neg)
                // Than o1 is closer to 0
                return 1;
            // Than o1 is farther from 0
            return -1;
        }

        // If o2 is shorter than o1 (left of the decimal)...
        if (o1LeftLength > o2LeftLength) {
            // and we're negative numbers...
            if (o2Neg)
                // Than o2 is closer to 0
                return -1;
            // Than o2 is farther from 0
            return -1;
        }

        // Left of the decimal is the same length...
        // March through the left
        char o1Char;
        char o2Char;
        for (int pos = 0; pos < o1LeftLength; pos++) {
            o1Char = o1Left.charAt(pos);
            o2Char = o2Left.charAt(pos);
            if (o1Char != o2Char) {
                // Lower digits in o1Char make this negative, higher make it positive...
                return o1Char - o2Char;
            }
        }

        // Okay... everything was the same to the left... check the right
        int rightLength = Math.min(o1Right.length(), o2Right.length());
        for (int pos = 0; pos < rightLength; pos++) {
            o1Char = o1Right.charAt(pos);
            o2Char = o2Right.charAt(pos);
            if (o1Char != o2Char) {
                int multiplier = 1;
                if (o1Neg)
                    multiplier = -1;
                // Lower digits in o1Char make this negative, higher make it positive...
                return (o1Char - o2Char) * multiplier;
            }
        }

        // Everything was the same... now it comes down to this... if o1's right side is bigger, it is the bigger of
        // the two numbers
        int multiplier = 1;
        if (o1Neg)
            multiplier = -1;
        return (o1Right.length() - o2Right.length()) * multiplier;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Ugh... I see that the OP has changed and the byte array is a String representation, but that you don't really want to convert it into an int, long, double, etc. That changes the comparable a bit, but the principle is still the same. What you would look at is if the first character is a negative -- if it is in one and not the other, great; if it is in neither, first check the string length and then compare digit-by-digit if the lengths are the same (if they aren't, the longer string is greater) until you find one that is less-than; else reverse what I just said (longer is less than, etc) – DanO Feb 24 '15 at 19:58
  • Thanks for this. It looks a lot like my attempt, which I'll post shortly. Good to know i was on the right track. BTW. I was pretty amazed at how fast you came up with that. I could not do that. – L. Blanc Feb 25 '15 at 19:36
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I believe that this is a correct, if not especially optimized, solution. The most obvious optimization would be to avoid the array copying.

/**
 *  Compares byte arrays numerically. The byte arrays must contain the  
 *  UTF-8 encodings of the string representations of numeric values. 
 *  The values can be either integers or decimals.
 *  To get the numbers in the right format, you could create as:
 *  "466".getBytes(StandardCharsets.UTF_8);
 */
class NumericByteArrayComparator implements Comparator<byte[]> {

    static final byte ZERO = (byte) '0';
    static final byte POINT = (byte) '.';
    static final byte DASH = (byte) '-';


    @Override
    public int compare(byte[] leftArray, byte[] rightArray) {
        Numeric left = new Numeric(leftArray);
        Numeric right = new Numeric(rightArray);

        if (notSameSign(left, right)) {
            if (left.isNegative()) {
                return -1;
            }
            return 1;
        }
        // If we haven't returned we know they are the same sign
        if (!left.isDecimal() && !right.isDecimal()) {
            // the values are both whole numbers
            return compareIntegers(left, right);
        }
        // The whole numbers have been dealt with
        // Now we have left two numbers with the same sign. At least one is a decimal
        // Repeat the comparison above with the whole number portion

        if (left.decimalOffset != right.decimalOffset) {
            if (left.isNegative()) { // the values are both negative
                // the shorter is the greater
                return right.decimalOffset - left.decimalOffset;
            } // the values are both positive. The longer is the greater
            return left.decimalOffset - right.decimalOffset;
        }
        // the remaining whole number portions have the same length, compare byte-by-byte
        byte[] leftWhole = Arrays.copyOf(left.bytes, left.decimalOffset);
        byte[] rightWhole = Arrays.copyOf(right.bytes, right.decimalOffset);

        int result;
        if (left.isPositive()) {
            result = compareToSameLength(leftWhole, rightWhole);
        } else {
            result = compareToSameLength(rightWhole, leftWhole);
        }
        if (result != 0) {
            return result;
        }

        // Now we have nothing left to compare but the decimal portions
        if (left.isPositive()) {
            result = compareTo(left.decimalPortion(), right.decimalPortion());
        } else {
            result = compareTo(right.decimalPortion(), left.decimalPortion());
        }
        return result;
    }

    /**
     * Compares the given values, assumed to represent whole numbers
     */
    private int compareIntegers(Numeric left, Numeric right) {
        if (left.length() != right.length()) {
            if (left.isNegative()) { // the values are both negative
                // the shorter is the greater when numbers are negative
                return right.length() - left.length();
            } else {
                // the shorter is the lesser when numbers are positive
                return left.length() - right.length();
            }
        } else {
            // they are the same length & sign and both whole numbers. Compare byte by byte
            int result;
            if (left.isPositive()) {
                result = compareToSameLength(left.bytes, right.bytes);
            } else {
                result = compareToSameLength(right.bytes, left.bytes);
            }
            return result;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Compares byte by byte
     */
    private int compareTo(byte[] left, byte[] right) {
        int minLength = Math.min(left.length, right.length);
        for (int i = 0; i < minLength; i++) {
            int result = NumericByteArrayComparator.compare(left[i], right[i]);
            if (result != 0) {
                return result;
            }
        }
        return left.length - right.length;
    }

    /**
     * Compares byte-by-byte when both of the given arrays are the same length
     */
    private int compareToSameLength(byte[] left, byte[] right) {
        for (int i = 0; i < left.length; i++) {
            int result = NumericByteArrayComparator.compare(left[i], right[i]);
            if (result != 0) {
                return result;
            }
        }
        return 0;
    }

    /**
     * Compares the two specified {@code byte} values. The sign of the value
     * returned is the same as that of {@code ((Byte) a).compareTo(b)}.
     *
     * @param a the first {@code byte} to compare
     * @param b the second {@code byte} to compare
     * @return a negative value if {@code a} is less than {@code b}; a positive
     * value if {@code a} is greater than {@code b}; or zero if they are equal
     */
    public static int compare(byte a, byte b) {
        return a - b; // safe due to restricted range
    }

    /**
     * Returns true if the arguments have different signs (positive or negative)
     */
    private boolean notSameSign(Numeric p1, Numeric p2) {
        return p1.negative != p2.negative;
    }

    static class Numeric {
        final boolean negative;
        int decimalOffset;
        byte[] bytes;

        Numeric(byte[] n) {

            if (n.length == 0) {
                negative = true;
                decimalOffset = 0;
                bytes = n;
            } else {
                negative = (DASH == n[0]);
                bytes = trimSignAndLeadingZeros(n);
                decimalOffset = indexOf(POINT, bytes);
                if (decimalOffset == -1) {
                    decimalOffset = length();
                } else {  // trim trailing zeros only if this is a decimal number
                    bytes = trimTrailingZeros(bytes);
                }
            }
        }

        boolean isDecimal() {
            return decimalOffset < length();
        }

        int length() {
            return bytes.length;
        }

        /**
         * Returns true if this alphanumeric looks like a negative number
         */
        boolean isNegative() {
            return negative;
        }

        /**
         * Returns true if this alphanumeric looks like a positive number
         */
        boolean isPositive() {
            return !negative;
        }

        /** 
         * Returns the index of the given byte in the given byte array
         */
        int indexOf(byte ch, byte[] bytes) {
            final int max = bytes.length;
            int fromIndex = 0;

            for (int i = fromIndex; i < max; i++) {
                if (bytes[i] == ch) {
                    return i;
                }
            }
            return -1;
        }

        @VisibleForTesting
        byte[] trimSignAndLeadingZeros(byte[] array) {
            int len = array.length;
            int st = 0;

            while ((st < len) && (array[st] == ZERO)
                    || (st < len) && (array[st] == DASH)) {
                st++;
            }
            return ((st > 0) ? substring(st, len, array) : array);
        }

        @VisibleForTesting
        byte[] trimTrailingZeros(byte[] array) {
            int len = array.length;
            int st = len - 1;

            while ((st > 0) && (array[st] == ZERO)) {
                st--;
            }
            return ((st < len - 1) ? substring(0, st + 1, array) : array);
        }

        @VisibleForTesting
        byte[] substring(int start, int end, byte[] original) {
            int length = end - start;
            byte[] part = new byte[length];
            System.arraycopy(original, start, part, 0, length);
            return part;
        }

        @VisibleForTesting
        byte[] decimalPortion() {
            byte[] part = new byte[length() - decimalOffset];
            System.arraycopy(this.bytes, decimalOffset, part, 0, length() - decimalOffset);
            return part;
        }
    }
}
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