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I'm working on rsa private and public key / encryption / decryption / etc using openssl module. But a question is still unanswered : why private key are often (are always, i don't know) longer than public key ?

Is there several answer to this ?

public and private key

This is my public and private key generated.

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The RSA private key includes the values that are in the RSA public key, and some more values that are private. Futhermore, the values themselves are larger.

The public key contains the modulus and the public exponent e which is short (mostly 3 or 65537). On the other hand the private key contains the private exponent de−1 (mod φ(n)). Depending on φ(n), d can be vastly larger than e.

There are other public key algorithms where this is different. Some algorithms based on elliptic curves have a single big integer as the private key (and group description) and the public key has a curve point (and group description) which is larger than the big integer.

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why private key are often (are always, i don't know) longer than public key ?

The answer is detailed in PKCS 1 (and friends like RFC 2437).

The public key is the pair {e, n}, where e is the public exponent and n is the modulus.

One of the private key representations is the triplet {e, d, n}, where e is the public exponent, d is the private exponent and n is the modulus.

The other private key representations the n-tuple{e, d, n, p, q, dp, dq, qi}, where e is the public exponent; d is the private exponent; n is the modulus; and p and q are the factors of n.

And the remaining are for the Chinese Remainder theorem, which allows a speedup in signatures (I believe). dp is p's exponent, a positive integer such that e(dP) ≅ 1 (mod(p-1)); dq is q's exponent, a positive integer such that e(dq) ≅ 1 (mod(q-1)); and qi is CRT coefficient, a positive integer less than p such that q(qInv) ≅ 1 (mod p).

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