30

I'm looking to find records in a table that match a specific number that the user enters. So, the user may enter 12345, but this could be 123zz4-5 in the database.

I imagine something like this would work, if PHP functions worked in MySQL.

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE preg_replace("/[^0-9]/","",bar) = '12345'

What's the equivalent function or way to do this with just MySQL?

13 Answers 13

37

I realise that this is an ancient topic but upon googling this problem I couldn't find a simple solution (I saw the venerable agents but think this is a simpler solution) so here's a function I wrote, seems to work quite well.

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS STRIP_NON_DIGIT;
DELIMITER $$
CREATE FUNCTION STRIP_NON_DIGIT(input VARCHAR(255))
   RETURNS VARCHAR(255)
BEGIN
   DECLARE output   VARCHAR(255) DEFAULT '';
   DECLARE iterator INT          DEFAULT 1;
   WHILE iterator < (LENGTH(input) + 1) DO
      IF SUBSTRING(input, iterator, 1) IN ( '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' ) THEN
         SET output = CONCAT(output, SUBSTRING(input, iterator, 1));
      END IF;
      SET iterator = iterator + 1;
   END WHILE;
   RETURN output;
END
$$
  • Would calling SUBSTRING() once make this faster? – Stoutie Feb 15 '13 at 0:48
  • nm, runs plenty fast. 100,000+ records in a second or two. – Stoutie Feb 15 '13 at 1:00
  • just great, thank you – Novasol Mar 20 '15 at 15:13
  • This is slow - I've answered with a faster alternative below... :-) – wally Mar 10 '16 at 18:17
  • Confirmed, this one 2x slower then wally's – arheops Apr 30 '17 at 14:36
7

While it's not pretty and it shows results that don't match, this helps:

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE bar LIKE = '%1%2%3%4%5%'

I would still like to find a better solution similar to the item in the original question.

7

There's no regexp replace, only a plain string REPLACE().

MySQL has the REGEXP operator, but it's only a match tester not a replacer, so you would have to turn the logic inside-out:

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE bar REGEXP '[^0-9]*1[^0-9]*2[^0-9]*3[^0-9]*4[^0-9]*5[^0-9]*';

This is like your version with LIKE but matches more accurately. Both will perform equally badly, needing a full table scan without indexes.

6

Most upvoted answer (@user1467716) isn't the fastest. Full kudos to them for giving a working proposal to bounce off!

This is an improved version:

DELIMITER ;;
DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS `STRIP_NON_DIGIT`;;

CREATE DEFINER=`root`@`localhost` FUNCTION `STRIP_NON_DIGIT`(input VARCHAR(255)) RETURNS VARCHAR(255) CHARSET utf8
READS SQL DATA
BEGIN
   DECLARE output    VARCHAR(255) DEFAULT '';
   DECLARE iterator  INT          DEFAULT 1;
   DECLARE lastDigit INT          DEFAULT 1;
   DECLARE len       INT;

   SET len = LENGTH(input) + 1;
   WHILE iterator < len DO
      -- skip past all digits
      SET lastDigit = iterator;
      WHILE ORD(SUBSTRING(input, iterator, 1)) BETWEEN 48 AND 57 AND iterator < len DO
         SET iterator = iterator + 1;
      END WHILE;

      IF iterator != lastDigit THEN
         SET output = CONCAT(output, SUBSTRING(input, lastDigit, iterator - lastDigit));
      END IF;

      WHILE ORD(SUBSTRING(input, iterator, 1)) NOT BETWEEN 48 AND 57 AND iterator < len DO
         SET iterator = iterator + 1;
      END WHILE;
   END WHILE;

   RETURN output;
END;;

Testing 5000 times on a test server:

-- original
Execution Time : 7.389 sec
Execution Time : 7.257 sec
Execution Time : 7.506 sec

-- ORD between not string IN
Execution Time : 4.031 sec

-- With less substrings
Execution Time : 3.243 sec
Execution Time : 3.415 sec
Execution Time : 2.848 sec
3

The simplest way I can think to do it is to use the MySQL REGEXP operator a la:

WHERE foo LIKE '1\D*2\D*3\D*4\D*5'

It's not especially pretty but MySQL doesn't have a preg_replace function so I think it's the best you're going to get.

Personally, if this only-numeric data is so important, I'd keep a separate field just to contain the stripped data. It'll make your lookups a lot faster than with the regular expression search.

  • Speed is not important. This is for a back end tool that will only be used when an item in the database can't be found any other way. – Chris Bartow Nov 13 '08 at 15:03
  • 1
    That doesn't work in MySQL. – Robert Gamble Nov 13 '08 at 15:07
  • +1 for the suggestion of adding a field to store a normalized (i.e., digits-only) version of the value. – Dave Sherohman Nov 13 '08 at 16:52
3

This blog post details how to strip non-numeric characters from a string via a MySQL function:

SELECT NumericOnly("asdf11asf");

returns 11

http://venerableagents.wordpress.com/2011/01/29/mysql-numeric-functions/

  • This one is EXTREAMLY slow. 4x slowly then wally's answer – arheops Apr 30 '17 at 14:30
3

You can easily do what you want with REGEXP_REPLACE (compatible with MySQL 8+ and MariaDB 10.0.5+)

REGEXP_REPLACE(expr, pat, repl[, pos[, occurrence[, match_type]]])

Replaces occurrences in the string expr that match the regular expression specified by the pattern pat with the replacement string repl, and returns the resulting string. If expr, pat, or repl is NULL, the return value is NULL.

Go to REGEXP_REPLACE doc: MySQL or MariaDB

Try it:

SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE('123asd12333', '[a-zA-Z]+', '');

Output:

12312333
  • It would be ideal if you can give some explanations to the answer, thanks. – user6250760 May 4 '18 at 14:10
1

I have a similar situation, matching products to barcodes where the barcode doesn't store none alpha numerics sometimes, so 102.2234 in the DB needs to be found when searching for 1022234.

In the end I just added a new field, reference_number to the products tables, and have php strip out the none alpha numerics in the product_number to populate reference_number whenever a new products is added.

You'd need to do a one time scan of the table to create all the reference_number fields for existing products.

You can then setup your index, even if speed is not a factor for this operation, it is still a good idea to keep the database running well so this query doesn't bog it down and slow down other queries.

1

I came across this solution. The top answer by user1467716 will work in phpMyAdmin with a small change: add a second delimiter tag to the end of the code.

phpMyAdmin version is 4.1.14; MySQL version 5.6.20

I also added a length limiter using

DECLARE count INT DEFAULT 0; in the declarations

AND count < 5 in the WHILE statement

SET COUNT=COUNT+1; in the IF statement

Final form:

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS STRIP_NON_DIGIT;
DELIMITER $$
CREATE FUNCTION STRIP_NON_DIGIT(input VARCHAR(255))
   RETURNS VARCHAR(255)
BEGIN
   DECLARE output   VARCHAR(255) DEFAULT '';
   DECLARE iterator INT          DEFAULT 1;
   DECLARE count INT DEFAULT 0;
   WHILE iterator < (LENGTH(input) + 1) AND count < 5 DO --limits to 5 chars
      IF SUBSTRING(input, iterator, 1) IN ( '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' ) THEN
         SET output = CONCAT(output, SUBSTRING(input, iterator, 1));
         SET COUNT=COUNT+1;
      END IF;
      SET iterator = iterator + 1;
   END WHILE;
   RETURN output;
END
$$
DELIMITER $$ --added this
0

There's no regex replace as far as I'm concerned, but I found this solution;

--Create a table with numbers
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS ints;
CREATE TABLE ints (i INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY);

INSERT INTO ints (i) VALUES
( 1), ( 2), ( 3), ( 4), ( 5), ( 6), ( 7), ( 8), ( 9), (10),
(11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (17), (18), (19), (20);

--Then extract the numbers from the specified column
SELECT
    bar,
    GROUP_CONCAT(SUBSTRING(bar, i, 1) ORDER BY i SEPARATOR '')
FROM foo
JOIN ints ON i BETWEEN 1 AND LENGTH(bar)
WHERE
    SUBSTRING(bar, i, 1) IN ('0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9')
GROUP BY bar;

It works for me and I use MySQL 5.0

Also I found this place that could help.

0

How big is table with foo? If it is small, and speed really doesn't matter, you might pull the row ID and foo, loop over it using the PHP replace functions to compare, and then pull the info you want by row number.

Of course, if the table is too big, this won't work well.

  • This is probably about the same speed as my example using LIKE with wild cards between each number. – Chris Bartow Nov 13 '08 at 15:54
0

try this example. this is used for phone numbers, however you can modify it for your needs.

   -- function removes non numberic characters from input
-- returne only the numbers in the string

CREATE DEFINER =`root`@`localhost` FUNCTION `remove_alpha`(inputPhoneNumber VARCHAR(50))
  RETURNS VARCHAR(50)
  CHARSET latin1
DETERMINISTIC
  BEGIN


    DECLARE inputLenght INT DEFAULT 0;
    -- var for our iteration 
    DECLARE counter INT DEFAULT 1;
    -- if null is passed, we still return an tempty string
    DECLARE sanitizedText VARCHAR(50) DEFAULT '';
    -- holder of each character during the iteration
    DECLARE oneChar VARCHAR(1) DEFAULT '';


    -- we'll process only if it is not null.
    IF NOT ISNULL(inputPhoneNumber)
    THEN
      SET inputLenght = LENGTH(inputPhoneNumber);
      WHILE counter <= inputLenght DO
        SET oneChar = SUBSTRING(inputPhoneNumber, counter, 1);
        IF (oneChar REGEXP ('^[0-9]+$'))
        THEN
          SET sanitizedText = Concat(sanitizedText, oneChar);
        END IF;

        SET counter = counter + 1;
      END WHILE;
    END IF;

    RETURN sanitizedText;
      END

to use this user defined function (UDF). let's say you have a column of phone numbers:

col1
(513)983-3983
1-838-338-9898
phone983-889-8383

select remove_alpha(col1) from mytable

The result would be;

5139833983
18383389898
9838898383
0

thought I would share this since I built it off the function from here. I rearranged just so I can read it easier (I'm just server side).

You call it by passing in a table name and column name to have it strip all existing non-numeric characters from that column. I inherited a lot of bad table structures that put a ton of int fields as varchar so I needed a way to clean these up quickly before I can modify the column to an integer.

drop procedure if exists strip_non_numeric_characters;
DELIMITER ;;

CREATE PROCEDURE `strip_non_numeric_characters`(
    tablename varchar(100)
    ,columnname varchar(100)
    )
BEGIN

-- =============================================
-- Author:      <Author,,David Melton>
-- Create date: <Create Date,,2/26/2019>
-- Description: <Description,,loops through data and strips out the bad characters in whatever table and column you pass it>
-- =============================================

#this idea was generated from the idea STRIP_NON_DIGIT function
#https://stackoverflow.com/questions/287105/mysql-strip-non-numeric-characters-to-compare

declare input,output varchar(255);
declare iterator,lastDigit,len,counter int;
declare date_updated varchar(100);

select column_name 
    into date_updated
    from information_schema.columns 
    where table_schema = database() 
    and extra rlike 'on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP'
    and table_name = tablename
    limit 1;

#only goes up to 255 so people don't run this for a longtext field
#just to be careful, i've excluded columns that are part of keys, that could potentially mess something else up
set @find_column_length = 
concat("select character_maximum_length
    into @len
    from information_schema.columns
    where table_schema = '",database(),"'
    and column_name = '",columnname,"'
    and table_name = '",tablename,"'
    and length(ifnull(character_maximum_length,100)) < 255
    and data_type in ('char','varchar')
    and column_key = '';");

prepare stmt from @find_column_length;
execute stmt;
deallocate prepare stmt;

set counter = 1;        
set len = @len;

while counter <= ifnull(len,1) DO

    #this just removes it by putting all the characters before and after the character i'm looking at
    #you have to start at the end of the field otherwise the lengths don't stay in order and you have to run it multiple times
    set @update_query = 
    concat("update `",tablename,"`
        set `",columnname,"` = concat(substring(`",columnname,"`,1,",len - counter,"),SUBSTRING(`",columnname,"`,",len - counter,",",counter - 1,"))
        ",if(date_updated is not null,concat(",`",date_updated,"` = `",date_updated,"`
        "),''),
        "where SUBSTRING(`",columnname,"`,",len - counter,", 1) not REGEXP '^[0-9]+$';");

    prepare stmt from @update_query;
    execute stmt;
    deallocate prepare stmt;

    set counter = counter + 1;

end while;

END ;;
DELIMITER ;

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