2

I tried to move an ImageView on touch events by this code:

public class ScrollableImageView extends ImageView {
    private GestureDetectorCompat gestureDetectorCompat;

    public ScrollableImageView(Context context) {
        this(context, null);
    }

    public ScrollableImageView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        this(context, attrs, 0);
    }

    public ScrollableImageView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyleAttr) {
        super(context, attrs, defStyleAttr);
        setScaleType(ScaleType.MATRIX);

        gestureDetectorCompat = new GestureDetectorCompat(context,
                new MySimpleOnGestureListener(this));
    }

    @Override
    public boolean onTouchEvent(@NonNull MotionEvent event) {
        gestureDetectorCompat.onTouchEvent(event);
        return true;
    }

    public void scroll(float distance) {
        Matrix imageMatrix = getImageMatrix();
        imageMatrix.postTranslate(distance, 0);
        setImageMatrix(imageMatrix);
        invalidate();
    }

    private static class MySimpleOnGestureListener extends GestureDetector.SimpleOnGestureListener {
        private ScrollableImageView scrollableImageView;

        public MySimpleOnGestureListener(ScrollableImageView scrollableImageView) {
            this.scrollableImageView = scrollableImageView;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean onDown(MotionEvent e) {
            Utils.log("onDown");
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean onScroll(MotionEvent e1, MotionEvent e2, float distanceX, float distanceY) {
            scrollableImageView.scroll(-distanceX);
            return true;
        }
    }
}

At first, everything worked well on Nexus 5 (Android 4.4.4 and Lollipop). But then I tried on older versions of Android like 4.0.4(Galaxy S2) or Nexus S(4.1.1)... and none of them worked.

Then after struggling for a while, I came up with this solution and it worked well on all devices:

(Notice that now, I keep track of the ImageView's matrix object by a local object instead of getting it via ImageView's getImageMatrix())

public class ScrollableImageView extends ImageView {
    private GestureDetectorCompat gestureDetectorCompat;
    private Matrix imageMatrix;

    public ScrollableImageView(Context context) {
        this(context, null);
    }

    public ScrollableImageView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        this(context, attrs, 0);
    }

    public ScrollableImageView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyleAttr) {
        super(context, attrs, defStyleAttr);
        setScaleType(ScaleType.MATRIX);

        imageMatrix = new Matrix();

        gestureDetectorCompat = new GestureDetectorCompat(context,
                new MySimpleOnGestureListener(this));
    }

    @Override
    public boolean onTouchEvent(@NonNull MotionEvent event) {
        gestureDetectorCompat.onTouchEvent(event);
        return true;
    }

    public void scroll(float distance) {
        imageMatrix.postTranslate(distance, 0);
        setImageMatrix(imageMatrix);
        invalidate();
    }

    private static class MySimpleOnGestureListener extends GestureDetector.SimpleOnGestureListener {
        private ScrollableImageView scrollableImageView;

        public MySimpleOnGestureListener(ScrollableImageView scrollableImageView) {
            this.scrollableImageView = scrollableImageView;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean onDown(MotionEvent e) {
            Utils.log("onDown");
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean onScroll(MotionEvent e1, MotionEvent e2, float distanceX, float distanceY) {
            scrollableImageView.scroll(-distanceX);
            return true;
        }
    }
}

I got the solution but I still couldn't get why my former code didn't work?!

I tried to research but the only thing made sense was the documentation of ImageView's getImageMatrix():

Return the view's optional matrix. This is applied to the view's drawable when it is drawn. If there is no matrix, this method will return an identity matrix. Do not change this matrix in place but make a copy. If you want a different matrix applied to the drawable, be sure to call setImageMatrix().

Then it made me more confused by saying Do not change this matrix in place but make a copy, what's the point of doing so? why can't I just do like I did in the former code? (get the current matrix of the ImageView then apply translation, then set it back via setImageMatrix() as the documentation says)

Someone please shed me some light, this is too much confusion for me.

3

Ok, guys, I got it!

Actually the documentation makes sense.

Return the view's optional matrix. This is applied to the view's drawable when it is drawn. If there is no matrix, this method will return an identity matrix. Do not change this matrix in place but make a copy. If you want a different matrix applied to the drawable, be sure to call setImageMatrix().

Because of this code in ics_mr1's ImageView source code:

public void setImageMatrix(Matrix matrix) {
    // collaps null and identity to just null
    if (matrix != null && matrix.isIdentity()) {
        matrix = null;
    }

    // don't invalidate unless we're actually changing our matrix
    if (matrix == null && !mMatrix.isIdentity() ||
            matrix != null && !mMatrix.equals(matrix)) {
        mMatrix.set(matrix);
        configureBounds();
        invalidate();
    }
}

So if I do like:

   Matrix imageMatrix = getImageMatrix();
   imageMatrix.postTranslate(distance, 0);
   setImageMatrix(imageMatrix);

matrix != null && !mMatrix.equals(matrix) will be false because I reused the same Matrix object (that's why the documentation said Do not change this matrix in place but make a copy), then nothing would happen because none of the conditions is satisfied.

Then now I come up with a much elegant solution:

   Matrix imageMatrix = new Matrix(getImageMatrix());
   imageMatrix.postTranslate(distance, 0);
   setImageMatrix(imageMatrix);

That's it
YIKES

  • Thanks! That saved my time. – pratt Jun 26 '17 at 17:13

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.