301

How does one truncate a string to 75 characters in Python?

This is how it is done in JavaScript:

var data="saddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddsaddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddsadddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd"
var info = (data.length > 75) ? data.substring[0,75] + '..' : data;
0

18 Answers 18

515
info = (data[:75] + '..') if len(data) > 75 else data
9
  • 73
    I would change the condition perhaps to len(data) > 77 to account for the double dots (it's pointless to a truncate only the last character only to replace it with a dot).
    – hasen
    May 13 '13 at 3:49
  • 5
    @hasenj: That wouldn't conform to the original code, but it's a good suggestion that I should have pointed out in the first place. May 14 '13 at 0:23
  • 2
    Note that the included parens are of course optional. Nov 24 '16 at 2:20
  • 12
    @TaylorEdmiston True, but they're quite helpful for those who don't remember all the precedence rules across the 5–10 languages they use daily. Nov 24 '16 at 2:26
  • 2
    @Anthony a slice Sep 29 '18 at 22:23
144

Even shorter :

info = data[:75] + (data[75:] and '..')
4
  • 3
    Funny approach to do it. Though it's still a composite one-liner. ^^
    – Cheery
    May 20 '10 at 15:44
  • 6
    doesn't this solution have 77 characters if you include the '..' ? Oct 18 '11 at 16:21
  • 1
    isn't this performing two slice operations? I wonder how this performs compared to say stackoverflow.com/a/52279347/1834057, when performance is crucial Sep 9 '19 at 22:54
  • 3
    Sure, nice original answer, but Marcelo's answer is better since it is more explicit and thus readable (and thus Pythonic).
    – sitnarf
    Sep 19 '19 at 16:53
138

Even more concise:

data = data[:75]

If it is less than 75 characters there will be no change.

2
  • 10
    Presumably he wants an ellipsis appended if the string is truncated.
    – FogleBird
    May 20 '10 at 13:41
  • 4
    You're right - I never noticed that. I can't think of a better way to do that than other answers.
    – neil
    May 20 '10 at 14:00
113

If you are using Python 3.4+, you can use textwrap.shorten from the standard library:

Collapse and truncate the given text to fit in the given width.

First the whitespace in text is collapsed (all whitespace is replaced by single spaces). If the result fits in the width, it is returned. Otherwise, enough words are dropped from the end so that the remaining words plus the placeholder fit within width:

>>> textwrap.shorten("Hello  world!", width=12)
'Hello world!'
>>> textwrap.shorten("Hello  world!", width=11)
'Hello [...]'
>>> textwrap.shorten("Hello world", width=10, placeholder="...")
'Hello...'
5
  • 15
    It seems to crap its pants on really long strings (no spaces) and outputs only the ellipsis.
    – datu-puti
    Jul 26 '17 at 19:46
  • 9
    @elBradford (and interested others): that's because shorten() truncates words, not single characters. I searched but there doesn't seem a way to configure shorten() or a TextWrapper instance to clip single characters and not words.
    – Acsor
    Sep 10 '17 at 14:51
  • 2
    And it has the annoying side effect of removing line breaks
    – havlock
    Dec 7 '17 at 17:05
  • 3
    This does not solve OP’s question. It truncates by word and even removes whitespace. Apr 24 '19 at 15:32
  • To hard-wrap (ignore whitespace): def shorten(s, width, placeholder='[...]'): return s[:width] if len(s) <= width else s[:width-len(placeholder)] + placeholder Jan 3 at 5:53
43

For a Django solution (which has not been mentioned in the question):

from django.utils.text import Truncator
value = Truncator(value).chars(75)

Have a look at Truncator's source code to appreciate the problem: https://github.com/django/django/blob/master/django/utils/text.py#L66

Concerning truncation with Django: Django HTML truncation

1
  • 1
    This needlessly couples low-level logic to django. Would not recommend it.
    – Caveman
    Jan 10 '20 at 13:48
13

With regex:

re.sub(r'^(.{75}).*$', '\g<1>...', data)

Long strings are truncated:

>>> data="11111111112222222222333333333344444444445555555555666666666677777777778888888888"
>>> re.sub(r'^(.{75}).*$', '\g<1>...', data)
'111111111122222222223333333333444444444455555555556666666666777777777788888...'

Shorter strings never get truncated:

>>> data="11111111112222222222333333"
>>> re.sub(r'^(.{75}).*$', '\g<1>...', data)
'11111111112222222222333333'

This way, you can also "cut" the middle part of the string, which is nicer in some cases:

re.sub(r'^(.{5}).*(.{5})$', '\g<1>...\g<2>', data)

>>> data="11111111112222222222333333333344444444445555555555666666666677777777778888888888"
>>> re.sub(r'^(.{5}).*(.{5})$', '\g<1>...\g<2>', data)
'11111...88888'
3
  • well that didn't worked when you have spaces in your string
    – holms
    Oct 19 '15 at 1:01
  • 1
    Why would you use regex for such a simple case? Aug 18 '16 at 12:14
  • It does work with spaces. e.g. for the last one the output is: '111111111 222222222 333333333 444444444 55555555556666666666777777777 88888...' Mar 10 '21 at 10:23
11

You could use this one-liner:

data = (data[:75] + '..') if len(data) > 75 else data
3
7
limit = 75
info = data[:limit] + '..' * (len(data) > limit)
1
  • 1
    This is the most elegant solution. Additionally I would extract the chars limit (in this case 75) into a variable to avoid inconsistencies. limit = 75; info = data[:limit] + '..' * (len(data) > limit)
    – ekauffmann
    Oct 25 '18 at 13:41
6

This just in:

n = 8
s = '123'
print  s[:n-3] + (s[n-3:], '...')[len(s) > n]
s = '12345678'
print  s[:n-3] + (s[n-3:], '...')[len(s) > n]
s = '123456789'     
print  s[:n-3] + (s[n-3:], '...')[len(s) > n]
s = '123456789012345'
print  s[:n-3] + (s[n-3:], '...')[len(s) > n]

123
12345678
12345...
12345...
1
  • 2
    All of the previous answers neglect to consider what the OP really wanted - an output string no longer than 75 characters. Kudos for understanding the "don't do what I say, do what I want" programming principle. For completeness you could fix the corner case of n<3 by appending: if n > 2 else s[:n]
    – Dave
    Apr 15 '20 at 16:35
6
info = data[:min(len(data), 75)
2
  • 1
    Code only answers are generally considered low quality. Could you add an explanation to your answer.
    – Lemon Kazi
    Nov 5 '19 at 4:30
  • 1
    should be info = data[:min(len(data), 75)] last ] is missing
    – Sebastian
    Jun 28 '21 at 9:28
5

This method doesn't use any if:

data[:75] + bool(data[75:]) * '..'

1
  • 4
    I wrote it only to show that it's possible. It's against python's readability philosophy. It doesn't have any performance advantage comparing with other "if" based methods. I never use it and I don't suggest you use it too.
    – Sassan
    Aug 23 '16 at 9:19
4

You can't actually "truncate" a Python string like you can do a dynamically allocated C string. Strings in Python are immutable. What you can do is slice a string as described in other answers, yielding a new string containing only the characters defined by the slice offsets and step. In some (non-practical) cases this can be a little annoying, such as when you choose Python as your interview language and the interviewer asks you to remove duplicate characters from a string in-place. Doh.

3
  • The question resulted from the programming language JavaScript and not C. There the strings are also immutable.
    – colidyre
    Feb 18 '21 at 9:14
  • 1
    The question was "How does one truncate a string to 75 characters in Python?". The answer is "You can't". That the OP thinks Javascript substring == truncate is irrelevant. Further, the point of my answer is that the Pythonic idiom that is used is string "slicing" in instances where in - for example C - you might truncate a string. It saves allocation and duplication by just using a couple of pointers into the existing string.
    – Dave
    Feb 18 '21 at 15:00
  • 1
    I think it is clear that the OP doesn't mean to truncate the original string. He/She wants obviously the same behavior as in JavaScript. But nevertheless, your answer is very correct and could help others to understand that also in Python strings are immutable and you're not transforming the original string. (+1)
    – colidyre
    Feb 18 '21 at 15:09
4
info = data[:75] + ('..' if len(data) > 75 else '')
3

Yet another solution. With True and False you get a little feedback about the test at the end.

data = {True: data[:75] + '..', False: data}[len(data) > 75]
1
       >>> info = lambda data: len(data)>10 and data[:10]+'...' or data
       >>> info('sdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdf')
           'sdfsdfsdfs...'
       >>> info('sdfsdf')
           'sdfsdf'
       >>> 
2
  • 1
    Please explain your answer?
    – Gwenc37
    May 7 '14 at 14:28
  • similar example of this function def info2(data): if len(data)>10: return data[:10]+'...' else: return data lambda instruction of the nameless design in a functional style ex = lambda x:x+1 def ex(x): return x+1
    – Spouk
    May 7 '14 at 19:48
1

Simple and short helper function:

def truncate_string(value, max_length=255, suffix='...'):
    string_value = str(value)
    string_truncated = string_value[:min(len(string_value), (max_length - len(suffix)))]
    suffix = (suffix if len(string_value) > max_length else '')
    return string_truncated+suffix

Usage examples:

# Example 1 (default):

long_string = ""
for number in range(1, 1000): 
    long_string += str(number) + ','    

result = truncate_string(long_string)
print(result)


# Example 2 (custom length):

short_string = 'Hello world'
result = truncate_string(short_string, 8)
print(result) # > Hello... 


# Example 3 (not truncated):

short_string = 'Hello world'
result = truncate_string(short_string)
print(result) # > Hello world

0

There's no need for a regular expression but you do want to use string formatting rather than the string concatenation in the accepted answer.

This is probably the most canonical, Pythonic way to truncate the string data at 75 characters.

>>> data = "saddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddsaddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddsadddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd"
>>> info = "{}..".format(data[:75]) if len(data) > 75 else data
>>> info
'111111111122222222223333333333444444444455555555556666666666777777777788888...'
1
  • I found it funny how your saddddddd... string turns into 111111...:) I know it's a copy-paste typo though, and I agree with you about regular expressions. Jan 29 '18 at 8:46
0

Here's a function I made as part of a new String class... It allows adding a suffix ( if the string is size after trimming and adding it is long enough - although you don't need to force the absolute size )

I was in the process of changing a few things around so there are some useless logic costs ( if _truncate ... for instance ) where it is no longer necessary and there is a return at the top...

But, it is still a good function for truncating data...

##
## Truncate characters of a string after _len'nth char, if necessary... If _len is less than 0, don't truncate anything... Note: If you attach a suffix, and you enable absolute max length then the suffix length is subtracted from max length... Note: If the suffix length is longer than the output then no suffix is used...
##
## Usage: Where _text = 'Testing', _width = 4
##      _data = String.Truncate( _text, _width )                        == Test
##      _data = String.Truncate( _text, _width, '..', True )            == Te..
##
## Equivalent Alternates: Where _text = 'Testing', _width = 4
##      _data = String.SubStr( _text, 0, _width )                       == Test
##      _data = _text[  : _width ]                                      == Test
##      _data = ( _text )[  : _width ]                                  == Test
##
def Truncate( _text, _max_len = -1, _suffix = False, _absolute_max_len = True ):
    ## Length of the string we are considering for truncation
    _len            = len( _text )

    ## Whether or not we have to truncate
    _truncate       = ( False, True )[ _len > _max_len ]

    ## Note: If we don't need to truncate, there's no point in proceeding...
    if ( not _truncate ):
        return _text

    ## The suffix in string form
    _suffix_str     = ( '',  str( _suffix ) )[ _truncate and _suffix != False ]

    ## The suffix length
    _len_suffix     = len( _suffix_str )

    ## Whether or not we add the suffix
    _add_suffix     = ( False, True )[ _truncate and _suffix != False and _max_len > _len_suffix ]

    ## Suffix Offset
    _suffix_offset = _max_len - _len_suffix
    _suffix_offset  = ( _max_len, _suffix_offset )[ _add_suffix and _absolute_max_len != False and _suffix_offset > 0 ]

    ## The truncate point.... If not necessary, then length of string.. If necessary then the max length with or without subtracting the suffix length... Note: It may be easier ( less logic cost ) to simply add the suffix to the calculated point, then truncate - if point is negative then the suffix will be destroyed anyway.
    ## If we don't need to truncate, then the length is the length of the string.. If we do need to truncate, then the length depends on whether we add the suffix and offset the length of the suffix or not...
    _len_truncate   = ( _len, _max_len )[ _truncate ]
    _len_truncate   = ( _len_truncate, _max_len )[ _len_truncate <= _max_len ]

    ## If we add the suffix, add it... Suffix won't be added if the suffix is the same length as the text being output...
    if ( _add_suffix ):
        _text = _text[ 0 : _suffix_offset ] + _suffix_str + _text[ _suffix_offset: ]

    ## Return the text after truncating...
    return _text[ : _len_truncate ]
1
  • 4
    whats with all the underscores in every single argument and variable? Sep 9 '19 at 22:50

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