3

I am using numpy for calculating eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a symmetrical, square array. My array is:

L = [[ 2. -1. -1.  0.  0.  0.]
     [-1.  3.  0. -1.  0. -1.]
     [-1.  0.  2. -1.  0.  0.]
     [ 0. -1. -1.  3. -1.  0.]
     [ 0.  0.  0. -1.  2. -1.]
     [ 0. -1.  0.  0. -1.  2.]]

The results when executing numpy.linalg.eig(L) are show below

eigenvalues:

[ 5.00000000e+00,   
  3.96872205e-16,   
  1.00000000e+00,
  2.00000000e+00,   
  3.00000000e+00,   
  3.00000000e+00 ]

eigenvectors:

[[ -2.88675135e-01   4.08248290e-01  -5.00000000e-01  4.08248290e-01   -4.36632863e-01   4.44614891e-01]
 [  5.77350269e-01   4.08248290e-01  -3.34129212e-16  4.08248290e-01   -1.08813217e-01  -5.41271705e-01]
 [  2.88675135e-01   4.08248290e-01  -5.00000000e-01  4.08248290e-01    5.45446080e-01   9.66568140e-02]
 [ -5.77350269e-01   4.08248290e-01   1.06732810e-16  4.08248290e-01   -1.08813217e-01  -5.41271705e-01]
 [  2.88675135e-01   4.08248290e-01   5.00000000e-01  4.08248290e-01   -4.36632863e-01   4.44614891e-01]
 [ -2.88675135e-01   4.08248290e-01   5.00000000e-01 -4.08248290e-01    5.45446080e-01   9.66568140e-02]]

The results are close (if normalized) to those you get when you analytically compute them, but some errors seem to introduce in both eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Is there some way to bypass these errors using numpy?

Where are these errors come from? What algorithm numpy uses?

4
  • it looks pretty accurate to me – Fabricator Feb 25 '15 at 19:22
  • the second eigenvalue is 3.96872205e-16 instead of 0. Also in the 3 eigenvector there should be two 0s, instead there is -3.34129212e-16 and 1.06732810e-16. – igavriil Feb 25 '15 at 19:25
  • Those are rounding errors which are almost zero. If x is your result, you can get rid of all those rounding errors with np.where(x < 1e-15, 0, x) – mty Feb 25 '15 at 19:30
  • 1
    Errrr..... Is Wolfram Alpha actually analytically computing them, or is it just better at appropriately representing the output for human-readability? In general, computing eigenvectors/eigenvalues involves solving a polynomial of the same degree of the size of the matrix. The Abel-Ruffini theorem shows that there is no solution for sextics in radicals. Therefore, for an arbitrary 6x6 full-rank matrix, there is no analytic solution to find the eigenvalues/vectors. Provably so. – Him Aug 30 '19 at 16:03
10

If you want the precision of the analytic derivation, you will need to use symbolic computation, which is what Wolfram Alpha, Mathematica, and related systems use. In Python, you may want to look into SymPy, for example.

The numerical computation that is embedded into the NumPy package you're using is inherently subject to the small errors and vicissitudes of floating point numerical representations. Such errors and approximations are unavoidable with numerical computing.

Here's an example:

from sympy import Matrix, pretty

L = Matrix([[ 2, -1, -1,  0,  0,  0,],
     [-1,  3,  0, -1,  0, -1,],
     [-1,  0,  2, -1,  0,  0,],
     [ 0, -1, -1,  3, -1,  0,],
     [ 0,  0,  0, -1,  2, -1,],
     [ 0, -1,  0,  0, -1,  2,]])

print "eigenvalues:"
print pretty(L.eigenvals())
print
print "eigenvectors:"
print pretty(L.eigenvects(), num_columns=132)

Yields:

eigenvalues:
{0: 1, 1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 2, 5: 1}

eigenvectors:
⎡⎛0, 1, ⎡⎡1⎤⎤⎞, ⎛1, 1, ⎡⎡-1⎤⎤⎞, ⎛2, 1, ⎡⎡1 ⎤⎤⎞, ⎛3, 2, ⎡⎡1 ⎤, ⎡0 ⎤⎤⎞, ⎛5, 1, ⎡⎡1 ⎤⎤⎞⎤
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢ ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥  ⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢0 ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢1 ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥  ⎢-1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-2⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢ ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥  ⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢0 ⎥  ⎢1 ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢ ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥  ⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢0 ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥  ⎢-1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢2 ⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢ ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥  ⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢1 ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢1 ⎥  ⎢0 ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢-1⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎢⎜      ⎢⎢ ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥  ⎢  ⎥⎥⎟  ⎜      ⎢⎢  ⎥⎥⎟⎥
⎣⎝      ⎣⎣1⎦⎦⎠  ⎝      ⎣⎣1 ⎦⎦⎠  ⎝      ⎣⎣1 ⎦⎦⎠  ⎝      ⎣⎣0 ⎦  ⎣1 ⎦⎦⎠  ⎝      ⎣⎣1 ⎦⎦⎠⎦

While the ASCII pretty-printer is, um, working hard to provide even quasi-good looking output, you can see that you are getting symbolically computed, precise output. If you're using IPython and have it set up to show LaTeX output, you'll get a nicer display.

5

It looks like it is using an iterative method from LAPACK. It converges to a solution. If it doesn't converge, it throw an exception.

Since you know the matrix is symmetric, you may do better with eigh. http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.linalg.eigh.html

Documentation Page: http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.linalg.eig.html

Source Code: https://github.com/numpy/numpy/blob/v1.9.1/numpy/linalg/linalg.py#L982

3
  • Yep, it looks like it's the *geev family of LAPACK routines for eig and *syevd and *heevd for the real-valued eigh. See github.com/numpy/numpy/blob/v1.9.1/numpy/linalg/… – IanH Feb 25 '15 at 19:34
  • numpy.linalg.eigh doesn't change the result. It seem that uses the same numerical method – igavriil Feb 25 '15 at 19:35
  • @igavriil the issues you're seeing are the consequence of the fact that this is a numerical method at all. Floating point computations bring some inaccuracies. If you need exact arithmetic, you'll have to use sympy, as suggested in the other answer. This answers "how does numpy compute eigenvalues and eigenvectors?" eigh should be more accurate when it is applicable, but it is still a numerical method with floating point error. – IanH Feb 25 '15 at 19:43

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