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Recently started learning Assembly so I'm relatively new to this. We use Linux back at school but I wanted to try coding on my PC. I'm using nasm on a Win8.1 64-bit system.

Here's the code:

section .text
    global _WinMain@16

_WinMain@16:
    mov edx, len
    mov ecx, msg
    mov ebx, 1
    mov eax, 4
    ret 16

    mov eax, 1
    ret 16

section .data
    msg db 'Hello, world!', 0xA
    len equ $ - msg

nasm seems to be running since it responds to the commands, but it doesn't execute the program:

command line in win8.1

How can I run the program? Is there something wrong with the code or is it system compatibilities? My last resort would be to install Ubuntu.

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  • 3
    There's something wrong with the code. I don't see any call in your asm that would print the message. I just see a ret 16 (return).
    – lurker
    Feb 26, 2015 at 3:37
  • Also, nasm has nothing to do with the execution of your program. nasm is only involved in the first step, where your assembly code is converted to object code.
    – Michael
    Feb 26, 2015 at 8:30

1 Answer 1

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I'll start with returning.

main.asm

[section] .text
    global _main

_main:
        mov eax, 6
        ret         ; returns eax (exits)

All this program does is return 6.

Assemble and link like so:

c:\Users\James\Desktop>nasm -fwin32 main.asm

c:\Users\James\Desktop>ld -e _main main.obj -o main.exe

c:\Users\James\Desktop>main.exe

c:\Users\James\Desktop>echo %errorlevel%
6

Using a stack frame.

main.asm

[section] .text
    global _main

_main:
        push    ebp     ; set up stack frame
        mov     ebp,esp

        push 6          
        pop eax;        ; mov 6 into eax using the stack

        leave           ; destroy stack frame
        ret             ; return eax

compiling:

c:\Users\James\Desktop>nasm -fwin32 main.asm

c:\Users\James\Desktop>ld -e _main main.obj -o main.exe

c:\Users\James\Desktop>main

c:\Users\James\Desktop>echo %errorlevel%
6

To use your own external functions you would:

func.asm

[section] .text
    global _func

_func:
        push ebp        ; set up stack frame
        mov  ebp,esp

        mov eax, [ebp+8] ; move argument into eax
        add eax, 3       ; eax = eax + 3

        leave           ; destroy stack frame
        ret             ; return to caller with (eax + 3)

main.asm

[section] .text
    global _main

extern _func

_main:
        push    ebp     ; set up stack frame
        mov     ebp,esp

        push 3          ; push argument onto stack for function
        call _func      ; calling the function
        add esp, 4      ; clean 1 argument

        leave           ; destroy stack frame
        ret             ; return what func returned in eax

compiling:

c:\Users\James\Desktop>nasm -fwin32 func.asm

c:\Users\James\Desktop>nasm -fwin32 main.asm

c:\Users\James\Desktop>ld -e _main main.obj func.obj -o main.exe

c:\Users\James\Desktop>main

c:\Users\James\Desktop>echo %errorlevel%
6

I'm pretty sure in your code instead of ret 16, you mean int 80h.

If so, you can't make system calls in windows like you can in linux, but you can use gcc to link with c's library functions, for instance; stdio's puts.

To use c library functions like printf or puts you would do:

 [section] .text
    global _main

    extern _puts

    _main:
            push ebp        ; set up stack frame
            mov ebp,esp

            push helloStr   ; push argument onto stack for function
            call _puts      ; calling the function
            add esp, 4      ; clean 1 argument

            mov eax, 0
            leave           ; destroy stack frame
            ret             ; return 0 (exit)

[section] .data
    helloStr    db  "Hello World!",0

And instead of using ld (because the parameters are tough to get right), you can just use gcc on the obj file like you would an ordinary c source file.

c:\Users\James\Desktop>nasm -fwin32 main.asm

c:\Users\James\Desktop>gcc main.obj -o main.exe

c:\Users\James\Desktop>main
Hello World!

(puts adds a new line automatically)

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