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I'm working with a custom WPF behavior (the one from System.Windows.Interactivity) showing a couple of dependency properties, one of those being a string. The behavior also overrides OnAttached in order to grab a reference to its AssociatedObject UI control.

When that attached property is data-bound to viewModel and is later changed (and notified) at some point, everything seems fine: OnAttached has been fired "at the beginning", and later the PropertyChangedCallback gets fired.

The issue I see is when the property is not bound, but set to a "static" value in XAML. In this case the PropertyChangedCallback gets fired before OnAttached, when the behavior has yet to know its associated UI control and basically cannot do anything in reaction to that property changing.

I guess I'm missing something on how things should be done in this case. Any help in understanding this is appreciated. TA

EDIT
Showing here some code, if that might be helpful in this case:

public class SomeUIControlBehaviour : Behavior<SomeUIControl>
{
    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        base.OnAttached();
        _attachedUIControl = this.AssociatedObject;
    }

    protected override void OnDetaching()
    {
        base.OnDetaching();
        _attachedUIControl = null;
    }

    private SomeUIControl _attachedUIControl;

    private void MessageChanged()
    {
        if (_attachedUIControl != null)
        {
            // do something on it
        }
        else
        {
            // bummer!
        }
    }

    // Text property + dependency property

    public string Message
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(MessageProperty); }
        set { SetValue(MessageProperty, value); }
    }

    private static string _defaultMessage = String.Empty;

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for Message.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty MessageProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Message", 
            typeof(string), typeof(SomeUIControlBehaviour),
            new PropertyMetadata(_defaultMessage, MessagePropertyChanged));

    private static void MessagePropertyChanged(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs evt)
    {
        //Debug.WriteLine("MessagePropertyChanged, on " + sender.GetType().Name + ", to value " + evt.NewValue);

        SomeUIControlBehaviour behaviour = sender as SomeUIControlBehaviour;

        if (behaviour == null) 
        {
            Debug.Fail("Message property should be used only with SomeUIControlBehaviour");
            return;
        }

        behaviour.MessageChanged();
    }
}
  • 1
    I guess that one simple answer could be: when behavior gets attached, just check if the property has already a value (maybe different than default) and in that case do what the PropertyChangedCallback was supposed to do. – superjos Feb 26 '15 at 11:50
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As per comment, one simple answer could be:

when behavior gets attached, just check if the property has already a value (maybe different than default) and in that case do what the PropertyChangedCallback was supposed to do.

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