155

To check if a module exists I have tried the following:

try {
    Import-Module SomeModule
    Write-Host "Module exists"
} 
catch {
    Write-Host "Module does not exist"
}

The output is:

Import-Module : The specified module 'SomeModule' was not loaded because no valid module file was found in any module directory.
At D:\keytalk\Software\Client\TestProjects\Export\test.ps1:2 char:5
+     Import-Module SomeModule
+     ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : ResourceUnavailable: (SomeModule:String) [Import-Module], FileNotFoundException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : Modules_ModuleNotFound,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.ImportModuleCommand

Module exists

I do get an error, but no exception is thrown, so we see Module exists in the end, although SomeModule does not exist.

Is there a good way (preferably without generating an error) to detect if a PowerShell module is installed on the system?

1

20 Answers 20

190

You can use the ListAvailable option of Get-Module:

if (Get-Module -ListAvailable -Name SomeModule) {
    Write-Host "Module exists"
} 
else {
    Write-Host "Module does not exist"
}
4
  • 2
    I was going to suggets: Import-Module NonexistingModule -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue IF($error){Write-Host 'Module does not exist'} ELSE{Write-Host 'Module does exist'} But your way is better, more elegant :) Commented Feb 26, 2015 at 10:58
  • This works great. Thanks. I'll use Write-Warning "Module does not exist..." ;Break But you've done all the hard work.
    – Craig.C
    Commented Dec 20, 2016 at 20:25
  • 1
    If you are importing libraries using Import-Module and a custom dll file, don't use the -ListAvailable option to determine if the module is installed because it won't be listed. According to the PowerShell 6 documentation, "ListAvailable does not return information about modules that are not found in the PSModulePath environment variable, even if those modules are loaded in the current session".
    – Dave F
    Commented Sep 2, 2019 at 13:50
  • This does not determine if a module has been installed (i.e. Import-Module) it only determines if the module is immediately available to be installed without specifying a specific location not already in $env:PSModulePath Commented May 21, 2020 at 18:17
57

A module could be in the following states:

  • imported
  • available on disk (or local network)
  • available in an online gallery

If you just want to have the darn thing available in a PowerShell session for use, here is a function that will do that or exit out if it cannot get it done:

function Load-Module ($m) {

    # If module is imported say that and do nothing
    if (Get-Module | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq $m}) {
        write-host "Module $m is already imported."
    }
    else {

        # If module is not imported, but available on disk then import
        if (Get-Module -ListAvailable | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq $m}) {
            Import-Module $m -Verbose
        }
        else {

            # If module is not imported, not available on disk, but is in online gallery then install and import
            if (Find-Module -Name $m | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq $m}) {
                Install-Module -Name $m -Force -Verbose -Scope CurrentUser
                Import-Module $m -Verbose
            }
            else {

                # If the module is not imported, not available and not in the online gallery then abort
                write-host "Module $m not imported, not available and not in an online gallery, exiting."
                EXIT 1
            }
        }
    }
}

Load-Module "ModuleName" # Use "PoshRSJob" to test it out
5
  • 2
    this is great "all-in-one" solution (I've only changed Load-Module to return $true/$false instead of EXIT) Commented Aug 29, 2018 at 6:06
  • This is beautiful.
    – sean
    Commented Dec 16, 2020 at 19:53
  • This seems to slow down my profile a lot when I do like this. It takes more than 2 sec now to load the profile.
    – John
    Commented Jan 15, 2021 at 16:44
  • I tested this successfully on PowerShell 7.3.1 on macOS. Nice work, Rod!
    – Van Vangor
    Commented Dec 21, 2022 at 22:03
  • Great answer! There's one more state - a module can be "saved" with Save-Module but not available in Get-Module -ListAvailable. Microsoft has some modules saved in C:\Modules on Microsoft-hosted Azure DevOps agents, for example.
    – oderibas
    Commented Feb 23, 2023 at 12:30
36

The ListAvailable option doesn't work for me. Instead this does:

if (-not (Get-Module -Name "<moduleNameHere>")) {
    # module is not loaded
}

Or, to be more succinct:

if (!(Get-Module "<moduleNameHere>")) {
    # module is not loaded
}
6
  • @oɔɯǝɹ I thought -ListAvailable was simply not available but I was still trying Import-Module. With Get-Module it's fine
    – Craig.C
    Commented Dec 20, 2016 at 20:16
  • 4
    You check if module LOADED(which is useful by itself -systemcentercentral.com/…), but not the other answer checks if module exists. Commented Jan 10, 2017 at 22:31
  • 1
    This executes much faster than using ListAvailable. Commented Apr 21, 2017 at 19:33
  • Fairly sure ! doesn't work in powershell depending on the version? Commented Jun 20, 2017 at 17:46
  • 2
    @KolobCanyon ! is an alias for -not, but I would not recommend using aliases in ps1 scripts in general. @GaTechThomas it also has a different behavior, as specified by @MichaelFreidgeim (it does not return a truthy value for installed, but not imported, modules). Commented Jan 22, 2018 at 11:00
27

The current version of Powershell has a Get-InstalledModule function that suits this purpose well (or at least it did in my case).

Get-InstalledModule

Description

The Get-InstalledModule cmdlet gets PowerShell modules that are installed on a computer.

The only issue with it is that it throws an exception if the module that is being requested doesn't exist, so we need to set ErrorAction appropriately to suppress that case.

if ((Get-InstalledModule `
    -Name "AzureRm.Profile" `
    -MinimumVersion 5.0 ` # Optionally specify minimum version to have
    -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue) -eq $null) {

    # Install it...
}
1
  • 4
    Get-InstalledModule only accounts for modules installed via Install-Module, Get-Module -List will account for all available modules regardless of how they were installed
    – gordy
    Commented Apr 29, 2022 at 17:51
18

You can use the Get-InstalledModule

If (-not(Get-InstalledModule SomeModule -ErrorAction silentlycontinue)) {
  Write-Host "Module does not exist"
}
Else {
  Write-Host "Module exists"
}
2
  • 2
    Many good answers here, but with this new simple method, this should probably be the new accepted answer.
    – not2qubit
    Commented Sep 29, 2020 at 10:55
  • 2
    This only works if PowerShellGet is installed. On some airgapped servers this is not the case.
    – Diti
    Commented Apr 20, 2022 at 7:10
17

When I use non-default modules in my scripts I call the function below. Besides the module name, you can provide a minimum version.

# See https://www.powershellgallery.com/ for module and version info
Function Install-ModuleIfNotInstalled(
    [string] [Parameter(Mandatory = $true)] $moduleName,
    [string] $minimalVersion
) {
    $module = Get-Module -Name $moduleName -ListAvailable |`
        Where-Object { $null -eq $minimalVersion -or $minimalVersion -lt $_.Version } |`
        Select-Object -Last 1
    if ($null -ne $module) {
         Write-Verbose ('Module {0} (v{1}) is available.' -f $moduleName, $module.Version)
    }
    else {
        Import-Module -Name 'PowershellGet'
        $installedModule = Get-InstalledModule -Name $moduleName -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
        if ($null -ne $installedModule) {
            Write-Verbose ('Module [{0}] (v {1}) is installed.' -f $moduleName, $installedModule.Version)
        }
        if ($null -eq $installedModule -or ($null -ne $minimalVersion -and $installedModule.Version -lt $minimalVersion)) {
            Write-Verbose ('Module {0} min.vers {1}: not installed; check if nuget v2.8.5.201 or later is installed.' -f $moduleName, $minimalVersion)
            #First check if package provider NuGet is installed. Incase an older version is installed the required version is installed explicitly
            if ((Get-PackageProvider -Name NuGet -Force).Version -lt '2.8.5.201') {
                Write-Warning ('Module {0} min.vers {1}: Install nuget!' -f $moduleName, $minimalVersion)
                Install-PackageProvider -Name NuGet -MinimumVersion 2.8.5.201 -Scope CurrentUser -Force
            }        
            $optionalArgs = New-Object -TypeName Hashtable
            if ($null -ne $minimalVersion) {
                $optionalArgs['RequiredVersion'] = $minimalVersion
            }  
            Write-Warning ('Install module {0} (version [{1}]) within scope of the current user.' -f $moduleName, $minimalVersion)
            Install-Module -Name $moduleName @optionalArgs -Scope CurrentUser -Force -Verbose
        } 
    }
}

usage example:

Install-ModuleIfNotInstalled 'CosmosDB' '2.1.3.528'

Please let me known if it's useful (or not)

0
16

Just revisiting this as it's something I just faced and there is some incorrect stuff in the answers (though it's mentioned in the comments).

First thing though. The original questions ask how to tell if a PowerShell module is installed. We need to talk about the word installed! You don't install PowerShell modules (not in the traditional way you install software anyway).

PowerShell modules are either available (i.e. they are on the PowerShell module path), or they are imported (they are imported into your session and you can call the functions contained). This is how to check your module path, in case you want to know where to store a module:

$env:psmodulepath

I'd argue that it's becoming common to use C:\Program Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules; more often due to it being available to all users, but if you want to lock down your modules to your own session, include them in your profile. C:\Users%username%\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Modules;

Alright, back to the two states.

Is the module available (using available to mean installed in the original question)?

Get-Module -Listavailable -Name <modulename>

This tells you if a module is available for import.

Is the module imported? (I'm using this as the answer for the word 'exists' in the original question).

Get-module -Name <modulename>

This will either return an empty load of nothing if the module is not imported or a one-line description of the module if it is. As ever on Stack  Overflow, try the commands above on your own modules.

1
  • 1
    You can install module in PowerShell. PowerShellGet has command Get-InstalledModule which is not returning the same output as Get-Module -ListAvailable
    – Igor
    Commented May 23, 2019 at 19:30
10

You can use the #Requires statement (supports modules from PowerShell 3.0).

The #Requires statement prevents a script from running unless the PowerShell version, modules, snap-ins, and module and snap-in version prerequisites are met.

So At the top of the script, simply add #Requires -Module <ModuleName>

If the required modules are not in the current session, PowerShell imports them.

If the modules cannot be imported, PowerShell throws a terminating error.

1
  • 3
    Note for others that might think this is such a cleaner solution than the longer functions above: this will import the module if it is not in the current session, but it will not go out and install it from internet sources. So you may need/require the longer solutions if you're going to be deploying this to machines that may or may not already have the module installed. Commented Apr 15, 2021 at 16:42
8
try {
    Import-Module SomeModule
    Write-Host "Module exists"
} 
catch {
    Write-Host "Module does not exist"
}

It should be pointed out that your cmdlet Import-Module has no terminating error, therefore the exception isn't being caught so no matter what your catch statement will never return the new statement you have written.

(https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/microsoft.powershell.core/about/about_try_catch_finally?view=powershell-6

From The Above:

"A terminating error stops a statement from running. If PowerShell does not handle a terminating error in some way, PowerShell also stops running the function or script using the current pipeline. In other languages, such as C#, terminating errors are referred to as exceptions. For more information about errors, see about_Errors."

It should be written as:

Try {
    Import-Module SomeModule -Force -Erroraction stop
    Write-Host "yep"
}
Catch {
    Write-Host "nope"
}

Which returns:

nope

And if you really wanted to be thorough you should add in the other suggested cmdlets Get-Module -ListAvailable -Name and Get-Module -Name to be extra cautious, before running other functions/cmdlets. And if it's installed from ps gallery or elsewhere you could also run a Find-Module cmdlet to see if there is a new version available.

6

Because this came up in so many answers, I am posting this as a separate answer instead of several comments. Please consider this as a public service announcement.

The answers based on using Get-InstalledModule are extremely dangerous if you really want to know if a module is available on a PowerShell installation. Get-InstalledModule will report the presence of a module only if it has been installed from PowerShellGet.

Evidence from PowerShell:

PS C:\Users\chris> Get-InstalledModule | Select-Object -Property Name, Version

Name         Version
----         -------
Choco        1.0.0
NTFSSecurity 4.2.6

PS C:\Users\chris> Get-Module | Select-Object -Property Name, Version

Name                            Version
----                            -------
chocolateyProfile               0.0
CimCmdlets                      7.0.0.0
Microsoft.PowerShell.Management 7.0.0.0
Microsoft.PowerShell.Security   7.0.0.0
Microsoft.PowerShell.Utility    7.0.0.0
Microsoft.WSMan.Management      7.0.0.0
PackageManagement               1.4.7
PowerShellGet                   2.2.5
PSReadLine                      2.1.0

There are no parameters for Get-InstalledModule that you can use to tell it to "show the other modules that you just aren't displaying right now." It can't display any others. As you can see above, it only shows two modules installed when I have nine imported into my session.

Since this is an answer, I will add guidance here:

  • @Kiemen Schindler's answer (https://stackoverflow.com/a/28740512/1236579) is a good one. As others have noted, the -ListAvailable parameter does not actually list all available modules. But practically, most of us probably don't care too much because if ListAvailable doesn't return a module, then we can't use it unless we already know how to load it using a non-standard/manual method, in which case we are unlikely to be searching for it to begin with.
  • If you need something beyond that, I think that both @TJ Galama and @Rod have supplied nice scripts for you to start with. I think that @Rod's function is particularly easy to read, and instructive if you are just learning about how modules are managed. However, it could still fail if your internet connection is down when it tries to seamlessly install a module before loading it.
  • So, if you just want a quick way to check whether a module is available to import, the best solution (as others have pointed out) is to use Get-Module -ListAvailable. Here is a simple example the OP could use:
$module = "SomeModule"

if (Get-Module -ListAvailable | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq $module}) {
  Write-Output "Module is installed."
  Import-Module $module
}
else {
  Write-Output "Module is not installed."
}

But rather than repeating this answer that others have supplied in the answers noted above, my main point is this: PLEASE do not walk away from this page thinking that Get-InstalledModule is a reliable way to determine if a module is installed (locally importable by name) on your PowerShell installation). It is not. It will supply you with the names of modules installed by PowerShellGet, but it will not supply you with the names of any other locally installed modules.

6

IMHO, there is difference between checking if a module is:

  1. installed, or
  2. imported:

To check if installed:

Option 1: Using Get-Module with -ListAvailable parameter:

If(Get-Module -ListAvailable -Name "<ModuleName>"){'Module is installed'}
Else{'Module is NOT installed'}

Option 2: Using $error object:

$error.clear()
Import-Module "<ModuleName>" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
If($error){Write-Host 'Module is NOT installed'}
Else{Write-Host 'Module is installed'}

To check if imported:

Using Get-Module with -Name parameter (which you can omit as it is default anyway):

if ((Get-Module -Name "<ModuleName>")) {
   Write-Host "Module is already imported (i.e. its cmdlets are available to be used.)"
}
else {
   Write-Warning "Module is NOT imported (must be installed before importing)."
}

Note: Once installed, importing a module again and again (i.e. importing module multiple times) doesn't throw error/exception, therefore your script can run the Import-Module "<ModuleName>" cmdlet as and when needed without having to worry whether or not a module is already imported (however importing the same module multiple times is not considered a good practice).

HTH.

2

Coming from Linux background. I would prefer using something similar to grep, therefore I use Select-String. So even if someone is not sure of the complete module name. They can provide the initials and determine whether the module exists or not.

Get-Module -ListAvailable -All | Select-String Module_Name(can be a part of the module name)

1
  • 1
    I understand what you're saying, @010 M, but your reasoning got me thinking about how in Linux, it's not always good to stream a lot of text through grep. For example, instead of running apt list | grep -E '^python3.*-pip.* \[installed(?:,\W+)?]', you might run apt list --installed python3*-pip*, instead. Similarly, in PS you can run Get-Module -ListAvailable -All -Name '*partial-name*' and not use Select-String at all to achieve the same result. Is one way better than the other? Probably, but whatever the reason is, it's not because one way is more like using grep than the other.
    – chris
    Commented Jul 4, 2022 at 0:21
1
  • First test if the module is loaded
  • Then import

```

if (Get-Module -ListAvailable -Name <<MODULE_NAME>>) {
    Write-Verbose -Message "<<MODULE_NAME>> Module does not exist." -Verbose
}
if (!(Get-Module -Name <<MODULE_NAME>>)) {
    Get-Module -ListAvailable <<MODULE_NAME>> | Import-Module | Out-Null
}

```

1

Here is the code to check if AZ module is installed or not:

$checkModule = "AZ"

$Installedmodules = Get-InstalledModule

if ($Installedmodules.name -contains $checkModule)
{

    "$checkModule is installed "

}

else {

    "$checkModule is not installed"

}
1

The absolute simplest one-liner without if-else block using Az module as an example:

Get-InstalledModule Az

This is what you want if you're working in the shell console and just want to check if a PowerShell module is installed or not.

1
  • for caveats see @chris answer, ".. only if it has been installed from PowerShellGet"
    – yzorg
    Commented Apr 17, 2023 at 19:18
1

Another Option instead of try/catch:

$Error.Clear()
Import-Module ActiveDirectory
if ($Error){
    "AD Module not installed. Installing."
    Add-WindowsCapability -Name Rsat.ActiveDirectory.DS-LDS.Tools~~~~0.0.1.0 -Online
}
0
Test-Path "C:\Program Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules\ModuleName"

If you know the module name and common install paths, you could use:

$a = New-Object -TypeName 'System.Collections.ArrayList'

$paths = "$env:userprofile\*\ModuleName","C:\Program 
Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules\ModuleName"

foreach ($path in $paths)
{
   $a.add($(Test-path $path))
}

If ($a -contains $true)
{
    Write-Host "ModuleName is installed" -ForegroundColor Green
}
else
{
    Write-Host "ModuleName is not installed" -foregroundcolor Red
}

Don't get me wrong, Get-module -listAvailable | where {$_.name -eq "ModuleName"} works very well, it just takes too long for me if you have a lot of modules installed.

0

For example, if you want to check if the sharepoint online module is installed, and if not install it....

if (-not(Get-Module -Name Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.PowerShell -ListAvailable | Select Name,Version))
{
 Install-Module -Name Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.PowerShell -Confirm:$false -Force
}
0

Here is another 'All-In-One' function that I use to check if a module is installed, and if not, it will install it.

Function InstallModule($PSModuleName) #As Boolean
{

 Function InstallPackageProvider($PackageProvider) #As Boolean
 {
  Write-Host "Istalling/Updating the '$PackageProvider' package provider."
  $Result = Get-PackageProvider -Name "$PackageProvider" -ForceBootStrap 2>$Null
  If ($Result -EQ $Null)
  {
   Write-Host "Failed to install/update the '$PackageProvider' package provider."
   Return $False
  } Else {
   Write-Host "Successfully installed/updated the '$($Result.Name)' package provider version '$($Result.Version)'."
   Return $True
  }
 } #End InstallPackageProvider

 Function ImportModule($PSModuleName) #As Boolean
 {
  Write-Host "Importing module '$PSModuleName'."
  Try
  {
   Import-Module $PSModuleName -Force -Erroraction Stop 2>$Null
   Write-Host "Successfully imported module '$PSModuleName'."
   Return $True
  } Catch {
   Write-Host "Failed to import module '$PSModuleName'."
   Return $False
  }
 } #End ImportModule

 Write-Host "Installing module '$PSModuleName'."
 $Result = Get-Module -Name $PSModuleName
 If ($Result -EQ $Null)
 {
  If (Get-Module -ListAvailable | Where-Object {$_.Name -EQ $PSModuleName})
  {
   If (ImportModule $PSModuleName)
   {
    Write-Host "Successfully installed module '$PSModuleName'."
    Return $True
   } Else {
    Write-Host "Failed to install module '$PSModuleName'."
    Return $False
   }
  } Else {
   If (InstallPackageProvider("NuGet"))
   {
    If (Find-Module -Name $PSModuleName 2>$Null | Where-Object {$_.Name -EQ $PSModuleName})
    {
     Set-PSRepository -Name "PSGallery" -InstallationPolicy Trusted 2>$Null
     Write-Host "Installing module '$PSModuleName'."
     Try
     {
      Install-Module -Name $PSModuleName -Repository "PSGallery" -Scope AllUsers -AllowClobber -Confirm:$False -Force -Erroraction Stop 2>$Null
      Write-Host "Successfully installed module '$PSModuleName'."
      If (ImportModule $PSModuleName)
      {
       Write-Host "Successfully installed module '$PSModuleName'."
       Return $True
      } Else {
       Write-Host "Failed to install module '$PSModuleName'."
       Return $False
      }
     } Catch {
      Write-Host "Failed to install module '$PSModuleName'."
      Return $False;
     }
    } Else {
     Write-Host "Module '$PSModuleName' is unavailable."
     Return $False
    }
   } Else {
    Write-Host "Package Provider "NuGet" is required."
    Return $False
   }
  }
 } Else {
  Write-Host "Module '$($Result.Name)' version '$($Result.Version)' is already installed."
  Return $True
 }

} #End InstallModule

Cls
$Ok = InstallModule "SqlServer"
If ($Ok)
{
 Write-Host "Successfully installed module."
} Else {
 Write-Host "Failed to install module."
}
-1

You can use the Get-InstalledModule

try {
    Get-InstalledModule -Name SomeModule
    echo "Azure PowerShell module (SomeModule) is installed."
} catch {
    echo "Azure PowerShell module (SomeModule) is not installed."
}

1
  • This answer (or something very similar) has already been suggested before.
    – Dennis
    Commented Mar 4 at 16:16

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