10

I'm frequently using the do-while-checkNextForNull-getNext looping pattern (don't know if there is an official name for it) in some of my projects. But in Java8, the use of Optional is considered as cleaner code than checking for null references in client-code. But when using Optional in this looping pattern, the code gets a bit verbose and ugly, but because Optional has some handy methodS, I would expect that there must exist a cleaner way than the one I came up with below.

Example:

Given the following class.

class Item {
    int nr;

    Item(nr) {
        this.nr = nr;
        // an expensive operation
    }

    Item next() {
        return ...someCondition....
            ? new Item(nr + 1)
            : null;
    }
}

In which the first item always has nr==1 and each item determines the next item, and you don't want to create unnecessary new items.

I can use the following looping do-while-checkNextForNull-getNext pattern in client-code:

Item item = new Item(1);
do {
    // do something with the item ....
} while ((item = item.next()) != null);

With Java8-Optional, the given class becomes:

class Item {
    ....

    Optional<Item> next() {
        return ...someCondition....
            ? Optional.of(new Item(nr + 1))
            : Optional.empty();
    }
}

And then the do-while-checkNextForNull-getNext looping pattern becomes a bit ugly and verbose:

Item item = new Item(1);
do {
    // do something with the item ....
} while ((item = item.next().orElse(null)) != null);

The orElse(null)) != null part feels uncomfortable.

I have looked for other kind of loops, but haven't found a better one. Is there a cleaner solution?

Update:

It is possible to use a for-each loop while at the same time avoiding null-references (the use of null-references is considered as a bad practice). This solution has been proposed by Xavier Delamotte, and doesn't need Java8-Optional.

Implementation with a generic iterator:

public class Item implements Iterable<Item>, Iterator<Item> {
    int nr;

    Item(int nr) { 
        this.nr = nr;
        // an expensive operation
    }

    public Item next() {
        return new Item(nr + 1);
    }

    public boolean hasNext() {
        return ....someCondition.....;
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<Item> iterator() {
        return new CustomIterator(this);
    }
}

and

class CustomIterator<T extends Iterator<T>> implements Iterator<T> {
    T currentItem;
    boolean nextCalled;

    public CustomIterator(T firstItem) {
        this.currentItem = firstItem;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
        return currentItem.hasNext();
    }

    @Override
    public T next() {
        if (! nextCalled) {
            nextCalled = true;
            return currentItem;
        } else {
            currentItem = currentItem.next();
            return currentItem;
        }
    }
}

Then client code becomes very simple/clean:

for (Item item : new Item(1)) {
    // do something with the item ....
}

Although this may be seen as a violation of the Iterator contract because the new Item(1) object is included in the loop, whereas normally, the for loop would immediately call next() and thus skipping the first object. In other words: for the first object, next() is violated because it returnS the first object itself.

  • 3
    Do you really have to use this pattern? Could you class implements Iterable and gives you an Iterator instead ? You would just have to implement hasNext() (which is your current boolean condition) and next, instead of implementing only next(). – Xavier Delamotte Feb 26 '15 at 11:53
  • 1
    @XavierDelamotte agree, this smells like (yet another) overuse of the Java8 featureset. it's a good question though, OP. – drew moore Feb 26 '15 at 11:59
  • @XavierDelamotte Iterator is notoriously awkward to implement on IO-based sources. To find out whether it hasNext, it actually has to read and cache the next element. Cursor-like idioms, relying only on the single method, are actually preferred. For example, Spliterator uses that approach, with an additional twist. – Marko Topolnik Feb 26 '15 at 12:01
  • @MarkoTopolnik Indeed. However Guava offers to use AbstractIterator to simplify the implementation of such iterators. code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/… – Xavier Delamotte Feb 26 '15 at 12:04
  • @XavierDelamotte The wrapper will still not help the fact that hasNext is supposed to be a side-effect-free method with no latency. Especially note the difficulties arising from the need to signal I/O errors to the client. – Marko Topolnik Feb 26 '15 at 12:06
10

You can do something like this :

Optional<Item> item = Optional.of(new Item(1));
do {
    Item value = item.get();
    // do something with the value ....
} while ((item = value.next()).isPresent());

or (to avoid the extra variable) :

Optional<Item> item = Optional.of(new Item(1));
do {
    // do something with item.get() ....
} while ((item = item.get().next()).isPresent());
  • One drawback of having Optional in the first line is that it suggests the possibility of null even though an item always exists in the loop-body. But interesting solution, I think it's indeed cleaner than orElse(null)) != null. Thanks! – Devabc Feb 26 '15 at 12:05
6

in Java8, the use of Optional is considered as cleaner code than checking for null references in client-code

No, it is the other way around: Optional can be used where it helps write cleaner code. Where it doesn't, just stick to the old idiom. Do not feel any pressure to use it if your existing idiom looks fine—and it does, in my opinion. As an example, this would be good usage of the Optional:

item.next().map(Object::toString).ifPresent(System.out::println);

Since you need to break out of the loop on the first non-present Optional, this doesn't really help.

However, I assume your true interest is more general: leveraging the features of Java 8 for your code. The abstraction you should pick is the Stream:

itemStream(() -> new Item(1)).forEach(item -> { ... all you need ... });

And, naturally, you can now go wild with stream processing:

itemStream(() -> new Item(1)).filter(item.nr > 3).mapToInt(Item::nr).sum();

This is how you would construct the stream:

import java.util.Spliterators;
import java.util.function.Consumer;
import java.util.function.Supplier;
import java.util.stream.Stream;
import java.util.stream.StreamSupport;

public class ItemSpliterator extends Spliterators.AbstractSpliterator<Item>
{
  private Supplier<Item> supplyFirst;
  private Item lastItem;

  public ItemSpliterator(Supplier<Item> supplyFirst) {
    super(Long.MAX_VALUE, ORDERED | NONNULL);
    this.supplyFirst = supplyFirst;
  }

  @Override public boolean tryAdvance(Consumer<? super Item> action) {
    Item item;
    if ((item = lastItem) != null)
      item = lastItem = item.next();
    else if (supplyFirst != null) {
      item = lastItem = supplyFirst.get();
      supplyFirst = null;
    }
    else return false;
    if (item != null) {
      action.accept(item);
      return true;
    }
    return false;
  }

  public static Stream<Item> itemStream(Supplier<Item> supplyFirst) {
    return StreamSupport.stream(new ItemSpliterator(supplyFirst), false);
  }
}

With this you are a tiny step away from the ability to seamlessly parallelize your computation. Since your item stream is fundamentally sequential, I suggest looking into my blog post on this subject.

3

Just add the loop support to your API:

class Item {
    int nr;

    Item(int nr) {
        this.nr = nr;
        // an expensive operation
    }

    public void forEach(Consumer<Item> action) {
        for(Item i=this; ; i=new Item(i.nr + 1)) {
            action.accept(i);
            if(!someCondition) break;
        }
    }
    public Optional<Item> next() {
        return someCondition? Optional.of(new Item(nr+1)): Optional.empty();
    }
}

Then you can simply iterate via lambda expression

    i.forEach(item -> {whatever you want to do with the item});

or method references

    i.forEach(System.out::println);

If you want to support more sophisticated operations than just forEach loops, supporting streams is the right way to go. It’s similar in that your implementation encapsulates how to iterate over the Items.

  • I would suggest for (Item i = this; i != null; i = i.next()) instead. Then this becomes a template method legal for any Item subclass (in fact, a perfect candidate for a default interface method if Item could be abstracted into one). – Marko Topolnik Feb 26 '15 at 13:55
  • 1
    @Marko Topolnik: that would be reasonable, if subclasses are ever considered. I couldn’t derive this from the original question. – Holger Feb 26 '15 at 14:48
0

Since this is related to some kind of design i come up with below design.

Create interface which support to provide optional next.

public interface NextProvidble<T> {

    Optional<T> next();
}

Item implement NextProvidble interface.

public class Item implements NextProvidble<Item> {
    int nr;

    Item(int nr) {
        this.nr = nr;
        // an expensive operation
    }

    @Override
    public Optional<Item> next() {
        return /*...someCondition....*/ nr < 10 ? Optional.of(new Item(nr + 1)) : Optional.empty();
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "NR : " + nr;
    }
}

Here i use /...someCondition..../ as nr < 10

And new class for Custom Do While as below.

public abstract class CustomDoWhile<T extends NextProvidble<T>> {

    public void operate(T t) {
        doOperation(t);
        Optional<T> next = t.next();
        next.ifPresent( nextT -> operate(nextT));
    }

    protected abstract void doOperation(T t);
}

Now what you have to done in your client code.

 new CustomDoWhile<Item>() {
            @Override
            protected void doOperation(Item item) {
                System.out.println(item.toString());
            }
        }.operate(new Item(1));

It may very clear. Please add your thoughts.

0

Dropping another alternative here that is available since Java 9.

Stream.iterate(new Item(1), Item::hasNext, Item::next)
      .forEach(this::doSomething)

Where doSomething(Item item) is the method that does something with the item.

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