4

I have a table (50M rows) which has indexes on column_a and column_b

when I do select count(*) from table where column_a in (list_a), I get in no time my results.

Same with select count(*) from table where column_b in (list_b).

But when I do

select count(*) from table where column_a in (list_a) or column_b in (list_b)

My queries become insanely slow and last half hour before outputting the right number... Am I doing something wrong? How can I optimize the actual behavior of this query?

Thanks!

Plan for query 1:

Plan hash value: 2471097773


-------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name                 |
-------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |                      |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE              |                      |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS               |                      |
|   3 |    SORT UNIQUE               |                      |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL        | LIST_A               |
|   5 |    BITMAP CONVERSION COUNT   |                      |
|   6 |     BITMAP INDEX SINGLE VALUE| MY_TABLE_IX02        |
-------------------------------------------------------------

Plan for query 2

Plan hash value: 1870911518

-------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name                 |
-------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |                      |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE              |                      |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS               |                      |
|   3 |    SORT UNIQUE               |                      |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL        | LIST_B               |
|   5 |    BITMAP CONVERSION COUNT   |                      |
|   6 |     BITMAP INDEX SINGLE VALUE| MY_TABLE_IX05        |
-------------------------------------------------------------

Plan for query 3:

Plan hash value: 1821967683

----------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                       | Name                 |
----------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                |                      |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE                 |                      |
|   2 |   FILTER                        |                      |
|   3 |    VIEW                         | index$_join$_001     |
|   4 |     HASH JOIN                   |                      |
|   5 |      BITMAP CONVERSION TO ROWIDS|                      |
|   6 |       BITMAP INDEX FULL SCAN    | MY_TABLE_IX02        |
|   7 |      BITMAP CONVERSION TO ROWIDS|                      |
|   8 |       BITMAP INDEX FULL SCAN    | MY_TABLE_IX05        |
|   9 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL            | LIST_A               |
|  10 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL            | LIST_B               |
----------------------------------------------------------------
  • What is table? What is column_a and list_a? Which indexes do you have on list_a? Etc. – Patrick Hofman Feb 26 '15 at 12:48
  • @PatrickHofman, column_a and b are varchar, list_a is 100 values from a select distinct on another table. list_a, list_b have binaries indexes, same as column_a, column_b – Stephane Feb 26 '15 at 12:48
  • Note that it's different counts, if both a and b is true... – jarlh Feb 26 '15 at 12:49
  • 1
    Have you tried EXPLAIN PLAN? Does Oracle use your indices? Have you tried adding a combined index on column_a, column_b? – Frank Schmitt Feb 26 '15 at 12:52
  • 1
    This looks suspicious - BITMAP INDEX SINGLE VALUE vs BITMAP INDEX FULL SCAN. Did you use the same IN clause for both tests? – Frank Schmitt Feb 26 '15 at 12:59
7

In my experience, OR tends to introduce a negative impact on queries (like ignoring indices and triggering full table scans). Sometimes this isn't so bad, but I have had queries that went from lightening fast to taking minutes because of it.

One possible solution is to change the OR into a UNION or even a UNION ALL. I have had success with this in the past to improve the performance of queries, but you will have to compare them to one another to see whether this will work for you.

You can try out the three options below and see if any one of them offers a significant improvement over the others.

Original query (edited to return rows since you mentioned returning data instead of doing a count):

select * from table where column_a in (list_a) or column_b in (list_b)

Query that avoids the OR:

select * from table where column_a in (list_a)
UNION
select * from table where column_b in (list_b)

And since a UNION triggers a DISTINCT, this might be worth trying out as well:

select * from table where column_a in (list_a) and not column_b in (list_b)
UNION ALL
select * from table where column_b in (list_b) and not column_a in (list_a)
UNION ALL
select * from table where column_a in (list_a) and column_b in (list_b)
  • I really like the thinking behind this. I'm going to experiment and let you know if it worked – Stephane Feb 26 '15 at 13:48
  • Just to give some numbers -- I went from 20 minutes on the full scan to 5 minutes with the third optimized union all query. Thanks so much! – Stephane Feb 26 '15 at 14:00
1

I guess that Oracle is using the indices for your first two queries and doing a full table scan for the third one. If you think about it, it's logical why Oracle cannot use the indices for the third query:

  • an index on column_a will give Oracle information about the values of column_a
  • an index on column_b will give Oracle information about the values of column_b

But neither index will give Oracle information about the combination of (column_a, column_b). So to speedup your query, you'll need an index that includes both column_a and column_b.

  • An index with both columns will not help with an OR query. – Necreaux Feb 26 '15 at 13:06
  • Why not? At least INDEX FAST FULL SCAN could be used. The question does not specify the length of list_a/list_b but according to exec plan the lists must be very long. – ibre5041 Feb 26 '15 at 13:24
  • @Necreaux, does data distribution matter in the OR case? – jarlh Feb 26 '15 at 13:24
  • The lists are not longer than 200 elements – Stephane Feb 26 '15 at 13:24
  • 2
    @jarlh Theoretically speaking yes. Practically speaking, I'm not sure, but probably not. Say the query is cola='A' and colb='Z' and there is an index on cola,colb. If A is 90% of the data, then it may make sense to traverse the remaining cola values and look for colb='Z' (although a full table scan probably makes more sense here). Now imagine if it is the reverse and A is 1% of the data. It would be much better to use a separate index on colb. At the end of the day, I don't think the optimizer will adjust for these cases, but I'm not 100% sure. – Necreaux Feb 26 '15 at 13:34

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